Location: Aberdeen Scotland

Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

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Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams Keith, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins Keith, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds Keith, born Nov. 11,...

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Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater MA

The Keith family of the region of country in and about the Bridgewaters, members of which have been most prominent and influential there from the beginning, is as ancient as are the settlements there. Bridgewater, as originally, was the first interior settlement in the Old Colony, the grant of the plantation being made in 1645, but the actual settlement was not commenced until after 1650, the first lots being taken up in the West Parish, and there the first house was built and the first improvements made, the proprietors and inhabitants practically all coming from Duxbury. From the ancient...

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Narrative of the Sufferings of Peter Williamson – Indian Captivities

Not for the faint of heart or stomach, this is a graphically descriptive recounting of the captivity of Peter Williamson, who was taken by the Delaware Indians, at his own house near the forks of the Delaware in Pennsylvania. Of all the sufferings reported by captives, this particular account appears to go above and beyond the usual descriptions, almost to the point of unbelievability – because in this case, he doesn’t simply report the acts of cruelty, but vividly describes them in the most horrid fashion, even to claim the Delaware committed cannibalism on one of their captives, and then explaining how they did it.

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Biography of Hon. John Shaw Dawson

On the roll of men who have been prominently identified with the civie affairs of the State of Kansas during the past two decades, the name of Hon. John Shaw Dawson occupies a leading and conspienous place. When he came to this state, in 1887, it was as a country school teacher, but he possessed the ambition and ability necessary to carry him to high position, and it was not long are he became connected with public matters, and, being admitted to the bar in 1898, rose rapidly in his profession and in public confidence. After serving in various positions of trust, in 1914 he was elevated to the bench of the Supreme Court, where he still remains as an associate justice. Judge Dawson was born at Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland, June 10, 1869, a son of James J. and Annie (Shaw) Dawson. His father spent the greater part of his life in railroad work in Great Britain, but in his later years followed merchandising in Scotland and held the position of postmaster in the village where he yet resides. John Shaw Dawson was primarily educated in the public schools, later attanding the Robert Gorden’s College, at Aberdeen, an institution of wide repute as a superior technical school. It was his father’s desire that he should enter the ministry for his life work, but, meeting with opposition from the prospective dominie,...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. John Fraser

Col. John Fraser, second chancellor of the University of Kansas and state superintendent of public instruction, earned his military title and became widely known as an educator, while a citizen of Pennsylvania. He was born in Cromarty, Scotland, about 1823; graduated with high mathematical honors from the University of Aberdeen and thereafter spent several years in the Bermudas as a teacher. Coming to the States he conducted several private schools in New York and Pennsylvania, and then held the chair of mathematies at Jefferson College for seven years from 1855, during which period he raised money for the first telescope used in a Western Pennsylvania institution and superintended the erection of an observatory. In 1862 he enlisted as a private at Canonsburg and fought for the North throughout the Civil war. He won the rank of captain of the One Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania volunteers in August, 1862; became lieutenant colonel in September, and in July of the next year was made colonel. “During the charge of Hancock at Spottsylvania he was wounded by a shell, and in September, 1864, he was captured and held at Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., Roper’s Hospital, Charlestown, S. C., and finally at Camp Sorghum, Columbia, S. C.” He was finally exchanged, and returning to his regiment was made brevet brigadier general and was mustered out in May, 1865. He then became president of...

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Biography of Alexander Craigmile

Alexander Craigmile. Of the men whose ability, industry and fore-thought have added to the character, wealth and progress of Champaign County none deserves better mention than Alexander Craigmile, a veteran of the Union army, long and successfully identified with agriculture, and now with his good wife living retired in a comfortable home at Rantoul. His public spirited citizenship has stood every test of time and service. Forty years he has known Compromise Township, and during that time has again and again been chosen to fill places of trust and responsibility. He was elected to serve as assessor, collector, supervisor and road commissioner, and is now on his second term as justice of the peace at Rantoul, having been reelected in April, 1917. He gave the best of his ability to the various offices, and his work in civil office has been characterized by the same fidelity which he displayed when following the flag of the Union during the Civil War. Mr. Craigmile is now commander of Seaver Post No. 253 of the Grand Army of the Republic at Rantoul. He is of Scotch nativity and ancestry, and was born near Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1843. When a child he immigrated with his parents to Upper Canada, and in 1852 the family came to Illinois. When Alexander Craigmile was twenty-one years of age he enlisted at Chicago in Company D of...

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Biographical Sketch of George Neil Stewart

Stewart, George Neil; university prof.; born, London, Can., April 18, 1860; son of James Innes and Catherine (Sutherland) Stewart; A. M., University of Edinburgh, 1883, B. S., 1886, D. Sc., 1887, M. B. and C. M., 1889, M. D. 1891; D. P. H., University of Cambridge, Eng., 1890; married; demonstrator of physiology, Owens College, Manchester, Eng., 1887-1889; George Henry Lewes student, University of Cambridge, 1889-1893; examiner in physiology, University of Aberdeen, 1891-1894; instructor Harvard Medical School, 1893-1894; prof. physiology and histology, Western Reserve University, 1894-1903; prof. physiology, University of Chicago, 1903-1907; prof. experimental medicine, Western Reserve University since 1907; member Physiology Society (Eng.), American Physiology Society, American Pharmacology Society. Author: Manual of Physiology, 1896, 6th edition,...

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Biography of John Aberdein

John Aberdein established his residence in Riverside in 1880, and in 1881 purchased the block between Fifth and Sixth and Lime and Lemon streets. His block contained two and one-half acres, and was devoid of any horticultural or building improvements. Mr. Aberdein immediately commenced the planting of citrus and deciduous fruit trees and the erection of his residence, and has now one of the representative homes of Riverside. His orange grove contains the choicest varieties of budded fruits, Washington Navels, Mediterranean Sweets and Malta Bloods. He also has a variety of deciduous fruits for family use. A well arranged two-story residence and suitable outbuildings, surrounded by ornamental trees and beautiful flowering plants, render his home one of the most pleasant and attractive character. Mr. Aberdein is a native of Scotland, born near Aberdeen, in 1821. His parents were John and Mary (Leighton) Aberdein, natives of Scotland. His father was a farmer by occupation and reared his son to that calling, giving him the advantage of a good education in the public schools. Mr. Aberdein also devoted considerable attention to landscape gardening. In 1853 he decided to try his fortunes in the new world and immigrated to the United States, locating in Knox County, Illinois, where he was engaged as a book-keener and clerk in a mercantile business until 1861. In that year he responded to the call of his...

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Biographical Sketch of Governor George Abernethy

GOVERNOR GEORGE ABERNETHY . – Oregon’s first governor will of necessity occupy an important place in her annals. This is due both to the intrinsic character of the man and to his official position. So frequently, however, does he appear in the narration of the body of events described in this work that it is not necessary to do more here than give the mere outlines of his career. He was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1807. The family moved to the United States soon after; and the future governor spent the first thirty-two years of his life in New York.. In 1840 he came to Oregon as a lay member of the Methodist Mission. Settling at Oregon City, and taking charge of the Mission store and its business in general, he soon developed a shrewdness that provided the Mission as well as himself personally with an abundance of the mammon of unrighteousness. At the inauguration of the Provisional government in 1845, he was chosen governor; and thereafter by successive elections he remained in the executive office till the establishment of the territory in 1849. Afterwards he became largely instrumental in starting various mercantile operations at Oregon City and Linn City. In some of his speculations he was unfortunate, and lost a great part of the savings of his active life. He suffered also in the great flood of...

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