In last week’s issue of the paper, we announced that Mrs. J. P. McQueen had suffered a stroke of paralysis on the 8th of April and that she was in critical condition at the time of going to press on Thursday, being in an unconscious condition. She remained in that condition until relieved by death, the messenger coming about 8 o’clock Friday evening [April 12, 1918]. The deceased had been a resident of Newman for the past twenty-eight years and prior to removal here had lived on a farm in South Prairie, where she had a large circle of warm friends. She was in her usual good health when stricken by paralysis and her death was a great shock to the whole community.

The funeral rites took place at the Christian Church, in this city, Sunday afternoon, at 2 o’clock, conduced by Rev. F. O. Fannon, who gave a very fine eulogy. Music on the occasion was rendered by a quartet composed of Mrs. A. J. Coley, Miss Gladys Tressenriter, Messrs. F. L. White and M. S. Smith with Mrs. C. E. Douglas presiding at the piano. The solo, “Shadows,” was very touchingly sung by M. S. Smith. The floral offerings were beautiful attesting the high esteem to which the deceased was held by her relatives and friends.

A large concourse of people gathered at the church to pay their last respects to the deceased, and followed the remains to their last resting place in the beautiful Newman Cemetery. The following obituary was read at the funeral rites:

“Malinda Catherine Cochran, only daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Cochran, was born in Bartholomew Co., Indiana, Dec. 27, 1854. She was united in marriage to Joshua P. McQueen, May 10, 1869 [March 12, 1870 according to marriage register], to which union was born a son who died in infancy, and two daughters, Mrs. Harriet Malinda Davis and Mrs. Louvina Slaughter, both of this city.

When but a young girl she united with the Baptist Church and later because of her nearness to the United Brethren Church at South Prairie, she became a member of that congregation. Upon moving to Newman twenty-eight years ago, last February, she became a member of the Christian Church in which she has been a faithful member of a regular attendant having attended church here on last Lord’s Day evening.

She was stricken with paralysis on last Monday, and passed away last Friday night, leaving an afflicted husband, two devoted daughters, a half brother and many friends to revere her memory.”

The daughter speaking of her mother’s life said “mother always looked on the bright side of everything. Tomorrow was to be better than today.” A rare quality and one well to be coveted. Fittingly then might we say of this unostentatious life she taught us.

Contributed by: Shelli Steedman