Luther C. Wade. While the agricultural community of Champaign County is known as one of the most progressive and prosperous of the world, the same quality of enterprise distinguishes the commercial element. A business organization that has made a successful record due to the hard work and enterprise of its members is the hardware house of Chapman & Wade at Fisher. Both members are young merchants, know thoroughly the art of sticking close to their business, and at the same time can take a long look ahead when that is required. They have made their house one of the leading establishments in the northwest part of the county, and the volume of their yearly business aggregates $30,000.

The junior member of this firm is Luther C. Wade, who has been a resident of Champaign County for twenty-two years. In that time in his relations as a merchant and as a citizen he has earned the respect of all who know him. Mr. Wade was born in Adams County, Ohio, November 1, 1886. He is the fifth in a family of six children, four sons and two daughters, born to Edmund and Susannah (Potts) Wade. Five of the children are still living. E. L. Wade, the oldest, was educated in the common schools, had two terms of instruction in Westfield College of Illinois, and is now married and a successful agriculturist in Brown Township, with home at Fisher. Charles H., the next in age, had a common school training, was an agriculturist and owns a well equipped farm of 160 acres in Colorado. He married Miss Lucy Ring, and they have six children. In politics he is a Socialist. Rosetta is the wife of Bert Chapman. The next of the family is Luther C. Wade. Orla J. resides in Champaign County.

Edmund Wade was born in Ohio, and throughout his active lifetime has followed agriculture as his main pursuit. The name Wade is of English or Welsh lineage. Mrs. Edmund Wade is now deceased.

Luther C. Wade was educated in the common schools, took a business course in Brown’s Business College at Champaign, and was also a student of instrumental music at the University of Illinois. He began his career at the very bottom round of the ladder and has climbed steadily to the heights of success.

After his education was finished Mr. Wade spent eight years as a renter of land in Brown Township of Champaign County, and finally left the farm to join Mr. Chapman in a partnership in the hardware business at Fisher. In 1916 Mr. Wade entered the Worsham Embalming School at Chicago, took the full course, and the members of his firm are now the only undertakers and embalmers at Fisher. They are thoroughly competent for this useful calling.

On September 30, 1908, Mr. Wade married Miss Leila Gossard. They have two young sons, Willard Edmund and Robert Earl. Willard E. is now in the first grade of the public schools. Mrs. Wade is a native of Champaign County, where she was born November 18, 1888, a daughter of Urvin and Belle (Hoffman) Gossard. Mrs. Wade was her parents’ only child. Her father was a native of Fayette County, Ohio, but was reared and educated in Illinois, learned the trade of blacksmith, and for a number of years has been engaged in merchandising at Fisher, where he still resides. He is a member of the United Brethren Church of that city and a Prohibitionist in politics. Mrs. Wade’s mother is now deceased. Mrs. Wade was educated in the common schools and has also taken courses in instrumental music. She is an active member of the United Brethren Church and president of the Ladies’ Aid Society. In matters of politics Mr. Wade is independent. He votes for the man he considers best fitted for the office, and is like thousands of other independent thinking young men of America today. Fraternally he is affiliated with the camp at Fisher of the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. and Mrs. Wade are young people who command the complete respect of their neighbors and friends, take an earnest attitude toward the problems of life, and have done much to solve the problems connected with comfortable living. They have their own automobile and have surrounded themselves with many of the comforts and conveniences.