James P. Yeazel. In the fertile agricultural country of Champaign County there are found many men who have passed their entire lives within its borders and have won success and standing. In this class is undeniably James P. Yeazel, who is now carrying on agricultural operations in section 8, Homer Township, which has been his home for nearly thirty-one years. He was born in this township, here received his training, both educational and agricultural, and here has passed his entire career, winning straightforward success with honor, and a strong place in the confidence of his fellow citizens.

Mr. Yeazel was born February 14, 1847, on the old Yeazel family homestead farm in Homer Township, a son of Adam and Maria (Crable) Yeazel, natives of Ohio. His father came to this community at a very early date in the history of the county, and, locating in Homer Township, took up land and applied himself to the cultivation of the soil. He continued to be engaged in farming during the remainder of his life, but did not live to enjoy the success which his industry and good management merited, as his death occurred in middle age, June 1, 1852. Mrs. Yeazel survived him for a long time and passed away in Homer township in 1886. There were ten children in the family, namely: Eliza Jane, Sarah, John and Mary, who are all deceased; Elizabeth, who is the widow of Captain Zeblin Hall, who earned his title while serving with Company C, Twenty-fifth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War; Isaac, deceased; James P.; William, of Tazewell County, Illinois; Wallace, of Homer; and Abraham.

James P. Yeazel attended the district schools of Homer Township and was brought up to be a farmer, the only vocation which he has ever followed. Until five years after his marriage he remained with his mother, for whom he operated the home farm, and then purchased a property of his own, 100 acres on section 8, Homer Township. To this original purchase he has since added, and he is now the owner of one of the valuable farms of the township, a tract noticeable for its many fine improvements, its good buildings and its general prosperous condition. Mr. Yeazel carries on his operations along modern lines, and is quick to note the value of innovations. In his conduct of his business transactions he has always been upright and honorable, and as a result has gained a position where his fellow citizens place their trust and confidence in him and consider his word as something as valuable as his bond. His operations in farming have been general in character, and as he is equally skilled in all departments his property shows a well-balanced success.

Mr. Yeazel was married December 11, 1878, to Miss Lucy A. Taylor, of Vermilion County, Illinois, and one daughter has been born to this union; Ethel M., who is now the wife of Barton Parrish, of Allerton, Illinois. Mr. Yeazel. is a Republican, but takes only a voter’s part in political affairs. He belongs to the Masons and the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and Mrs. Yeazel belong to the Presbyterian Church.