The lady whose name introduces this sketch needs no introduction to the residents of southeastern Idaho, for she is well known in this section of the state, and also in the capital city of Boise, where she has many friends. Her superior culture and ability have won public recognition through the honors that have been bestowed upon her by means of the public franchise, and she is now capably filling the office of county treasurer of Oneida County, making her home in Malad.

Miss Thews is a native of Rock Island County, Illinois, and is a daughter of William and Charlotte (Innes) Thews, both of whom were born in England, the former of Irish parents. They were married in that county, and in 1850 emigrated to America, locating in Illinois, whence they removed to Boise, Idaho, in 1869, at which time the now beautiful capital was a small village giving little promise of the changes which the future was to bring to it. The father was a stonemason by trade, and had a small quarry in Boise. In 1891 his life labors were ended, and he passed away at the age of seventy-one years. His good wife still survives him, and is now in the eightieth year of her age. They were the parents of seven children, but the eldest son, Thomas I., volunteered in the service of his country during the civil war, and was killed in the battle of Trevilian’s Station. Only three of the children are now living: Mrs. H. C. Branstetter, of Boise; William B., formerly auditor of Oneida county and now a resident of Pocatello; and Alice A.

The family are Episcopalians in religious faith and Miss Thews was educated in an Episcopalian school, in Boise. After completing her course she engaged in teaching school for six years in Boise and in Silver City, and fourteen years ago she came to Malad, where she has since made her home. For eight years she served as postmistress, under the administrations of Presidents Cleveland and Harrison, and discharged her duties in a most creditable and satisfactory manner. In 1898 she was elected treasurer of the county, receiving a very large majority, which indicated her high standing in the community and the confidence reposed in her. She is a lady of superior intelligence and ability, of marked executive force and keen business judgment, and her administration of the affairs of the office has won her high praise. She is now not only performing the services in connection with the county exchequer, but is also the owner of a hotel in Malad, which receives a liberal patronage on account of the excellent manner in which it is conducted. Miss Thews deserves great credit for what she has accomplished. Her ability is of a high order and her true womanliness and worth have gained her the respect of all with whom public life has brought her in contact and the friendship of those whom she has met in social circles.