Dea. Savage as the bell-ringer of the old church, whom the boys thought a wonderful man in his skill in balancing the bell upside down so truly during ringing for services. The writer, with other boys, sometimes climbed up the tower to the belfry deck while the bell was ringing, to try to discover the secret of how he balanced the wheel and bell so nicely. He remembers how the belfry shook as the bell wheel revolved, the deafening noise the bell gave out as its tongue clanged from side to side, and glad were they to clamber down again.

He also remembers the good deacon and family in their square pew on the east side near the door, one-half of which was shared with the family of the writer’s father, and in which the writer sat with them, in the days of Father Fisher’s ministry and that of Rev. Albert Cole in that house.

The family of Deacon Savage, besides himself and wife, consisted of the following children:

  1. William Savage, born Nov. 25, 1813; died Nov. 27, 1813.
  2. Phebe Wood Savage, born Sept. 6, 1815; married Frederick W. Darling.
  3. Nathan Parker Savage, born July 28, 1817; removed to Bangor.
  4. Sally Ann Savage, born Aug. 7, 1820; married Ichabod Grindle.
  5. Rebecca Tenney Savage, born July 27, 1822; married John Stillman Friend.

In the house with the Savage family lived Mrs. Lois Parker, the widow of Ezra Parker, and sister of Mrs. Savage.

After the death of Dea. Savage, F. A. Darling, who had married Phebe Wood Savage, daughter of the deacon, lived on the old place, took down or rebuilt the old house into two stories and occupied it until his death.