Half a mile or so north of Deep Cove and the house of James Day, was the lot and house of John Bartlett, so well known to the writer “in days lang syne”, but, like the others mentioned, long since deserted of habitation and of habitant.

John Bartlett was born at Mt. Desert in the early years of 1800, married Mary Hale, of Sedgwick, July 27, 1826, and set up housekeeping upon Long Island. Their children were:

  1. Caroline Hale Bartlett, born Dec. 23, 1823, out of wedlock.
  2. George Gurley Bartlett, born July 2, 1827; married Hamilton.
  3. Mary Ann Bartlett, born Sept. 2, 1828; married William A. Hall.
  4. Frederick Augustus Bartlett, born Oct. 21, 1830; died July 15, 1848.
  5. Vienna Bartlett, born May 1, 1833.
  6. John Bushrod Bartlett, born Aug. 27, 1834; died May, 1866.
  7. Nancy Elizabeth Bartlett, born June 30, 1836; died July 12, 1853.
  8. Hiram Hinckley Bartlett, born Dec. 4, 1838.
  9. James Candage Bartlett, born April 20, 1841.

John Bartlett was a fisherman, and gained his livelihood in that business, with a little farming. In 1840 and 1841, he resided upon Outer Duck island which had but a single house upon it. When his wife was about to be confined with her last child she was brought to Blue Hili Falls to the house of the writer’s grand-mother where the child was born and named James Candage Bartlett for the writer’s grandfather.

When Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett returned to Duck island, the writer accompanied them and spent two weeks with the family on the island in fishing and in visiting little Duck island, Baker’s island and its light-house, Gott’s Island, Bass Harbor, etc. It was a new experience to the writer and in all his wandering about the world since then he has not forgotten it.

The boy, James Candage Bartlett, grew to manhood, settled and married at Somerville, Mass., where he still resides. John Bartlett, his father, died many years ago, the date not recorded. His mother died in Charlestown, Mass., at the house of a married daughter some years ago at nearly ninety years of age.