Collection: A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri

Biographical Sketch of John Bird

Bird, John and his wife, Sarah Harvey, lived and died in Franklin County, Va. They had a son named Bartlett, who married Jane Jameson, by whom he had Mary, Edward, Abner, Marshall, and Sally. Mary was married first to Henry Morris, who died in Virginia. She then married Richard Stegall, who settled in Warren County, Mo., afterward removed to Jackson County, and now resides in Texas. Edward died single, in Virginia. Abner died in Nashville, Tennessee. Marshall married Mary J. Allen, and settled in Warren County in 1834. His children are Samuel, Sallie, Martha J., John B., Charles E., Charlotte V., and Fannie. Sallie, daughter of Bartlett Bird, married Edward Moorman, who settled in St. Charles County, Mo., in...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of the Clanton Brothers

Drury and Henry Clanton, of Tennessee, settled on a branch called “Pinch*” about five miles south of Danville, in 1818. Drury Clanton was a Methodist preacher, and it was at his house that the first Methodist church in Montgomery County was organized, by Rev. Robert Baker and himself, about the year 1819. A Sunday-school was also organized at the same time and place, and the first camp-meeting in Montgomery County was held there, on what was called the Loutre camp ground. Drury Clanton married a Miss James, of Tennessee, and their children were John, James, Thomas, William, Eliza, Nancy, Angeline, Rebecca, and Patsey.-Henry Clanton was married twice, and his children were-Wesley, Alonzo, Sally, Martha, and Mary. Martha and a Negro woman were burned to death on the prairie in Montgomery County. _____ * Captain John Baker gave the name to this branch, because the people who lived upon it were always “in a pinch” for something to live...

Read More

Biography of the Hensley Brothers

Samuel and Benjamin Hensley were sons of an English family that settled on the Potomac River in Virginia, at an early date. Samuel married a Miss Landers, and they had Samuel, Jr., and William. His first wife died, and he was married again to Susan Taplett, by whom he had several children. William, son of Samuel, Jr., by his first wife, married Elizabeth Appleberry, of Virginia, and they had James, Benjamin, William, Jr., Thomas, Fleming, Judith, and Elizabeth. James, William, Jr., Thomas, and Fleming came to Montgomery County in 1826, and all except Thomas afterward married and settled in Jefferson Co., Mo. Thomas Hensley was born in Albemarle Co., Va., in 1796, and when eighteen years of age he enlisted as a soldier in the war of 1812. He afterward married Harriet Rust, who was a daughter of Samuel Rust and Mary Lee Bailey, who was the daughter of James Bailey and Nancy Smith. Mr. Hensley with his wife and four children, embarked in a keel boat of his own make, on the Pocotalico river, and floated down to the Big Kenhawa, and thence to the Ohio, on their way to Missouri. They reached Louisville in safety, but just below that place their boat sank, and it was with the greatest difficulty that they succeeded in reaching the shore in safety. Here they built a cabin and remained one...

Read More

Biography of the See Family

The See family is of German origin. Three brothers, Adam, George, and Michael, with seven sisters, were raised in Hardy Co., Va. Their father, George, and a Negro man were all killed by lightning while stacking hay. The girls married and settled in Kentucky and Ohio. Adam was a prominent lawyer, and lived and died in Virginia. Michael married Catharine Baker, of Hardy Co., Va., by whom he had Mary, Elizabeth, Adam C , Barbara, Anthony, Jacob, John, Solomon, and Noah. Mr. See was a soldier of the war of 1812. He settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1837. His daughter Elizabeth married Hugh Hart, who settled in Montgomery County in 1839. Barbary married Thomas McCleary, who settled in Montgomery County in 1810 Jacob married Rachel Morrison, and settled in Montgomery County in 1837. He has been Justice of the Peace and Deputy Sheriff, and is now the Representative of his County in the State Legislature. He was also a prominent member and officer of the Evanix Society, in Danville. Mr. See is very fond of fine stock, and in 1871 he raised eighteen hogs that averaged from 700 to 1000 pounds each. He took them to St. Louis, had them made into bacon, and sent the hams to Memphis, Tenn. But they were shipped hack, with a statement from the commission merchant that they were not buying horse...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of James Adams

James Adams, of Virginia, settled in St. Louis Co., Mo., in 1818. He married Sally Brown, and their children were Burrell, James, Polly, Sally, Elizabeth, Lucy, Rebecca, Martha, and Nancy. Burrell was a soldier in the war of 1812. He came to Missouri in 1816, with Judge Beverly Tucker, and was married in 1818 to Harriet Allen, a daughter of John Allen, who died in 1830. Mr. Adams died in Danville, Mo., during the-summer of 1876, in his 82d year. He had eight children William B., B. T., J. B., James B., Susan F., John A., C. C., and Sarah E. William B. is a physician, lives in Danville, and has a practice that extends for many miles over that portion of the country. He is a very intelligent man, and exercises a large influence in the affairs of the County, which he has represented in the State Legislature. He possesses a large fund of ready wit and humor, and is an entertaining...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Charles Allen

Charles Allen and his wife, Elizabeth Powell, settled in Kentucky in 1800, and came to Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1823. Their children were Joseph H., David P., Charles P., Polly E., Elizabeth B., Anna A., Martha C., Tabitha W., Lucy J., and Catharine C. Mr. Allen was a carpenter by trade, and built the jail at Lewiston. His son, Joseph H., who was a physician, died at Troy, in Lincoln County. David P. was married first to Ann Boone, by whom he had two children. After her death he married Nancy. Courtney, of St. Charles, and they had eight children. He died in 1874. Charles P. married Eliza J. Courtney, by whom he had thirteen children. Tabitha and Catharine died before they were grown. Polly and Elizabeth married brothers named Simpson. Anna married William Cowherd, and their children were Charles A., James D.., William R., Catharine C., Martha E., and Elizabeth P. Charles and William died before they were grown. James married Ella Logan, of Montgomery County. Martha married Joseph Crane, of Callaway County. Elizabeth married Charles Blades, of Montgomery...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Maughs

Nathaniel Maughs was of Loudon County, Va. His children were David, William, John, Moses, Elijah, Stephen, Vinson, Mary, Sally, and Eli. Mr. Maughs removed from Virginia to Fleming County, Ky., and his children all came with him. David and William were Baptist preachers, and the former settled in Lincoln County, Mo. Elijah married .Mary Smith, by whom he had-Mordecai M., Milton M., Sophronia F., Lucinda S., Elijah C., Daniel M., and Mary S. V. Mr. Maughs died, and his widow married his brother Stephen, who settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1822. They had Jerry S. D. S., and George M. B. Mordecai Maughs, who was a physician, was married first to the widow Jane Scott; second to Dorothea Stephenson, and third to Lizzie Offutt. He had sixteen children in all. The Doctor was an educated, intelligent man, full of wit and humor, and very fond of practical jokes. He lived at Danville for many years, but finally removed to Callaway County, where he died. Sophronia Maughs married Dr. William Proctor, of St. Louis. Mary V. S. was married first to Henry Davault, and second to Willis Loyd, both old settlers of Montgomery County. Jerry died a bachelor in Montgomery County. George M. B., son of Stephen Maughs, is a physician. He married Anna Anderson, of Callaway County, and settled in St. Louis, where he has become distinguished in...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Ezekiel McCarty

Ezekiel and Ira McCarty were sons of James McCarty and Jane Harding, of Virginia. They settled in Clark County, Kentucky, in 1806, where they lived and died. They had twelve sisters, all of whom married and settled in Kentucky. Ezekiel was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was in the battle known as Dudley’s Defeat. He married Elizabeth Sidebottom of Kentucky. Their children were Shelton A., Eli, James, Sally, George W., John W., Joseph K., and Alfred S. Mr. McCarty removed to Missouri and settled in Danville in 1836. He died in 1866, and his wife in 1873. Eli, George W., and Alfred are the only surviving children. George W. is a Justice of the Peace and a prominent citizen. Ira McCarty, brother of Ezekiel, married a Miss Moore, of Kentucky, and settled in Boone County, Mo., where he raised a family of seven...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John McGinnis

John McGinnis and his wife came from Ireland, and settled first in Virginia, from whence they removed to Kentucky. Their son, Greenberry D., married Sallie Lewis, of Kentucky, and settled in Lincoln Co., Mo., in 1832. His children were Elizabeth, Margaret B., William B., Jane, Nancy, Thomas S., Maria, Milton, Sarah E., and Mary E. Milton married Margaret Williams, and settled in Pike County. Elizabeth married Enoch Sevier, and lives in Lincoln County. William B. married twice and settled in Illinois. Jane and Nancy died single. Sarah E. married John Harris, and settled in Illinois. Samuel, son of John McGinnis, Sr., was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Dora, Samuel, Jr., Polly, and Elizabeth. He was married the second time to Mrs. Mary McGinnis, by whom he had, Erasmus T., William, and Jesse G. Erasmus was married first to Miss Stewart, and second to Fanny Berger. He lives in Montgomery County. William also married a Miss Stewart, and lived and died in Montgomery...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Cornelius Mabrey

Cornelius Mabrey, of Pittsylvania Co., Va., was a. mill-wright by trade. He was married twice, but of his first wife and her children we have no account. His second wife was Polly Chaney, by whom he had Patsey, Pleasant, Letitia, Elizabeth, Polly, and Philip. Mr. Mabrey moved to middle Tennessee and lived there several years. He afterward settled in Logan County, Ky., where, after a residence of several years, he was drowned. In 1828 his widow and her children came to Missouri, and settled in Lincoln County, where she died two years after-ward. The eldest daughter, Patsey, married George Huss, who also settled in Lincoln County. Pleasant married Barsheba England, and is now living in Pike County. He had seven children, five of whom live in Montgomery County. Letitia married James Eidrum, of Kentucky. Elizabeth married Shelton Cobert. Polly married Elbert Enert. The three latter all live in Lincoln County. Philip, who lives in Montgomery County, was married twice; first to Polly Uptegrove, and second to Eliza J. Hughes. He is a carpenter by trade, and has done well in his battle with life. In his younger days he was very intimate with Dr. McFarland, of Troy, and they went to all the quiltings and dances together. They were both very tall men, and the lofts of the cabins had to be taken out before they could dance without...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Patton

Jacob Patton and his wife, Rebecca Barnett, of North Carolina, had four children James, Thomas, Mary, and Rebecca. They settled on Loutre Island, in Montgomery County, in 1810. James, the eldest son, married Violet Douglass, and they had-Robert, William, Jesse, Samuel D., Amelia, Cynthia A., and Violet. Jesse married Nancy Burrell, and lives in Boone County. Amelia married Eli Johnson, and is now a widow in Callaway County. The rest of James Patton’s children are dead. Thomas, brother of James Patton, was bitten by a mad wolf, at his home on Loutre Island, in January, 1816, and died of hydrophobia on the 16th of the following August, in the 43d year of his age. His wife died in December, 1867, in her 90th year. Their Children were James, William, Robert H., Thomas H., Elizabeth, Rebecca, Jane, Violet, and Mary. Rebecca, daughter of Jacob Patton, married John Gibson. She is now in her 88th year, a widow, and resides in Callaway County. Mary married Thomas Patton, and their children were James B., William, Robert H., Thomas H., Eli M., Elizabeth, Rebecca, Jane, Violet, and...

Read More

Biography of Reuben C. Pew

Reuben C. Pew was left an orphan at a very early age. According to the custom of those days he was “bound out” for his living, and got a very poor one. His master treated him badly, worked him hard, and gave him no education. When he was sixteen years of age he could not read or write, and his master, desiring to get rid of him, induced him to sign the muster roll of a company that was recruiting for service in the revolutionary war, telling him it was only a common piece of writing, and could do him no harm. The consequence was that he had to go into the army, very much against his will. He was captured soon after his enlistment, and held as a prisoner for several years, during which time he experienced all the horrors of the British prisons of those times. After the war he married a Miss Smith, and settled in North Carolina, where he and his wife died, leaving seven children, viz.: Reuben P., Benjamin F., Anderson S., Frances, Jemima, Polly, and Zilphey. Reuben P. was born in 1789. In 1810 he married his cousin, Sarah Park, who died in Kentucky in 1818, leaving four children Erasmus D., Permelia H., James S., and William H. When the war of 1812 began, Mr. Pew enlisted, and was taken prisoner at Dudley’s...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of George Peery

George, William, and James Peery emigrated from Scotland and settled in Tazewell Co., Va. George married Martha Davidson, of Ireland, and they had three sons and nine daughters. Joseph, the youngest son, married Elizabeth Hall, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1836. Their children were Charles, Albert G., Gordon C., Thomas, Andrew, William IL, Joseph A., and George. The members of the Peery family are a genial, hospitable people, and highly esteemed by their neighbors and acquaintances. Dr. Thomas Peery, who died in 1875, was especially distinguished for his many excellent qualities, and his loss is deeply felt by the community in which he...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Quick

Jacob Quick, of Germany, married a widow named Morris, whose maiden name was Rhoda Moore, of Ireland. They first settled in Maryland, where they had Aaron, Alexander, Jacob, Jr., Sarah, and Rachel. Mr. Quick then removed with his family to Kentucky, and in 1811 he came to Missouri and settled on Loutre Island, in Montgomery County. Previous to his removal to Kentucky his children had never tasted corn bread. In 1812 he built a block-house, for protection against the Indians, in Best’s Bottom, on the place that was settled by John Hancock, for whom Hancock’s Prairie was named. Mr. Quick died at this place in 1822, and his wife in 1834. During their residence there an old Indian named Phillips lived with them for several years. He finally left them, and his body was afterward found away out in the western wilderness, with his gun lying by his side. Aaron Quick, the eldest son, died a bachelor. Alexander married Nancy Gilbert, of Kentucky, where they resided thirteen years, and then came to Missouri. Their children were Elizabeth, William, Stephen, Sarah, Samuel, Aaron, Rhoda, Alexander, James, and Gilbert. Jacob, Jr., married Pheebe Copps, of Kentucky, and settled in Montgomery County, on Whippoorwill creek, in 1811. They had eight children William, Jacob, Sampson, Polly, Patsey, Sally, Peggy, and Elizabeth. Sarah Quick married Jacob Groom. Rachel married Robert McFarland, of Kentucky. They...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Gabriel Maupin

Gabriel Maupin, eldest son of Thomas Maupin, of Albemarle Co., Va., married Anna Spencer, by whom he had John, Thomas, Joel, Clifton, David, Arthur T., Susan, Nancy, Polly, Rosana, and Patsey. Arthur T. and Joel married and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest