Collection: Love Family Records

Love Family Genealogy

Some Data, Letters, and Memoranda Collected by Franklin D. Love, Relating to the Love Family, for permanent preservation, and reference, and for other general purposes. The following three volumes of information, has never before appeared in print form. Franklin Love recorded this information back in the 1940’s on a series of onion skinned bound books. It contains correspondence and research material he collected over several decades of exhaustive work. This data is valuable in it’s reflection of information he received from other related Love families concerning their ancestry at the time.  So if he was communicating with a 60 year old person who was detailing information they remembered about their grandparents you are getting first or second hand accounts about your Love ancestor who resided in the mid 1800’s… Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North CarolinaAlfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffied – DescendantsAndrew Taylor – DescendantsAnn Taylor Love – WillAsheville, North Carolina HistoryCertificate to Franklin D. Love from Dr. E.S. MillerCol. Robert Love – Revolutionary War RecordDillard Love – Contents of Will (5 Oct 1869)Dillard Love – Land RecordGanum O. McBee and Salla Bell Love – DescendantsJames Robert Love and Maria Williamson Coman – DescendantsJohn Alexander – DescendantsJohn BlairJohn Isaac Love – Notes on the WillJoseph BellJoseph Bell – DescendantsLetter from Col. Robert Gustavus Adolphus Love to Col. Robert LoveLetter from Col. Robert Love to...

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Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love – 18 April 1813

Waynesville, 18th of April 1813. Dear Thomas: I received your letter of the 2nd of March from Greeneville, a few days ago, and am much gratified to hear of your welfare, and of your having so promising a practice. It always takes time for to make a great lawyer-and great reading and profound study are among the ingredients to make men such; and this, I flatter myself, you will attend to and not stop merely because you are getting a tolerable practice. Consult frequently with men of strong mental parts, as from them are always something to be derived. I expected you over at Buncombe Superior Court; or have you given out the business of Macon? I wish you to visit your Grandmother frequently. She is getting old and needs comfort; and when you were young and needed assistance, she cheerfully lent you her aid; and now the scene is reversed, and let her not have it in her power to charge you with that foulest of crimes-ingratitude. I wish to hear from you on all occasions, and, I flatter myself, that Sammy and you will live together as brothers ought to do, and give assistance to each other where the same is needed. I am with the greatest affection, Your father, Ro....

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Letter from Col. Robert Love to William Love – Family

Letter from Col Robert Love to his brother, William Love, of Virginia. Near———–on Harpeth, 25th, of Nov. 1814 Dear Brother: I embrace this opportunity of writing a few lines by cousin Stephenson Bell, who will hand you this. It is with heartfelt emotion that I have heard of you still being in the land of the living, and enjoying reasonable share of health-having had it reported to me that you had gone to Orleans and died. My family, I left three weeks ago in a good state of health-thanks be to the Giver of all Good for His protection! Four of my children are married – (towit) Thomas, Anna, Samuel & Dorcas. Thomas to the oldest daughter of Governor Taylor (Note: It should be General Taylor-F.D. Love) of East Tennessee; Anna, you are acquainted with her husband; Samuel, to the oldest daughter of Joseph Young Esqr., near Jonesboro, and Dorcas, was married June last to Robert Henry, who you are acquainted with at Asheville. Thomas is at the bar in East Tennessee, and Samuel is settled near his father-in-law’s, and Anna and Dorcas are both living in Buncombe County. Jonny is living with his brother-in-law, Robert Henry, reading law, and he is the clerk of the Superior Court of Haywood County. I flatter myself that they are all doing well. Great changes have taken place since I had the...

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Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love, of Haywood County, North Carolina. Henry County, Paris, Tennessee. My Dear Nephew: 10 March 1843 I received your kind letter of the 23rd, Jan. 1843, which gave me much satisfaction to learn that my old and much beloved brother was still in the land of the living, and all friends in that County generally enjoying health. My family at present is in the enjoyment of reasonable health ever since you left me with the exception, of myself and Albert, who has not altogether recovered his health, but so much so that he attends to all his business. As to myself, I have been sorely afflicted with the Rheumatism pains in my neck for the last sixteen months, but for the last two or three weeks, I think, I have mended considerably, and if it should be the will of the Giver of all Good to continue His kind mercies towards me, and should my neck continue to improve, as it has done for the last two or three weeks, my intention is that, I think, sometime by the month of May, I will be able to ride in a carriage. My intention is at that time, or thereabouts, to set out for my old native country to see all my friends and relatives one more time. My son, Thomas...

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Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North Carolina

Extract from an Address delivered by Col. Allen T. Davidson, at Lyceum Asheville, N.C. Nov. 7th, 1890. “The most noted characters of the County who were in public life, were John Welch, General Thomas Love and Col Robert Love. These represented the County of Haywood for many years; preserved and maintained a high reputation until their death. Some of these had formerly represented Buncombe County in the Legislature; notably, Thomas Love, who represented Buncombe County from 1800 to 1808 (the sessions of the Legislature were then annual) afterwards served from Haywood form 1808 to 1828, perhaps, the longest service of any one man in the State continuously. He afterwards moved to Macon District of Tennessee; was elected to the Legislature from that State, and was mad Presiding Officer of the Senate. He was a man of very fine appearance. More that six feet tall, very popular, and a fine electioneer. Many amusing stories are told of him, such as carrying garden seeds in his pockets, and distributing them, always with the assurance that his wife had remembered the voters wife and sent them with her regards. The old gentlemen was fond of a good toddy, but did no resort to the mean subterfuge of electioneering with liquor. On one occasion, however, it is said of him that he signed a pledge of the temperance society which was then very...

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Letter from John Blair to Thomas D. Love

Letter from John Blair to Thomas D. Love Washington City, 3rd February, 1829. Dear Sir: Yours of the 20th, last month came to hand, to which I hasten to reply. You ask for information respecting the mode to be adopted in taking the next Census; and for my aid in procuring for you that appointment in Carter County. As to the inquiry, I can say the bill has not passed. Many members think it ought not at this term. I believe it should and that old mose of taking it is decidedly best. I am in favor of leaving responsibility and holding on to the person thus responsible. Some think the members of Congress best acquainted in their Districts, and, of course, the proper persons to give those appointments. On that plan you can easily see that there would be no regularity-no head to give the proper instructions, so as to procure uniformity and be responsible for such rules and regulations: hence I say the Marshalls should take the Census, and be responsible for their deputies or agents. The Present Marshall, Calloway, is an Administration man “and goes by the board”, when Jackson comes into Office. Therefore, I do not think it expedient before the passage of the law to send you a recommendation to a man, who must go out before the appointment is to be made. As...

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Robert Love – Will

(13 May 1842) Col. Robert Love’s Will, (1760 to 1845) In the name of God, Amen! I, Robert Love, of the town of Waynesville in the County of Haywood in the State of North Carolina, at this time being in reasonable health and sound and disposing mind and memory-thanks be to the Giver of All Blessings for his kind & tender mercies to me-but calling to mind the mortality of my Body, and believing that it is right and necessary for all men, as the Good old Book saith, to dispose of all their household and all the worldly concerns in order at the time they are the most capable, and now under this connection I do make, ordain and publish this and this only to be, my last Will and Testament, in manner and form following, that is to say, FIRST, I give my soul to Almighty God, who first gave it me, and my body to the Earth to be decently buried, and as to my worldly estate, I give and bequeath it in the following manner, (towit) First, I give, devise and bequeath to the children of my oldest son, Thomas D. Love, no deceased, and to their heirs and to Dillard Love, my third son, and to his heirs, all the land which I own in the County of Washington in the State of Tennessee....

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Letter from John Crosby, Deputy Clerk, to Franklin D. Love

Staunton, Virginia, May 13th, 1903. Mr. F.D. Love, Georgetown, Texas. Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th, of April, last, addressed to the Clerk, which has been handed to me by him for reply. Our records run back to 1745, the records show the names of Robert, Samuel, Ephriam and Joseph Love, who came to this county from Pennsylvania about 1747, but as these old records are poorly indexed and some of them not indexed at all, it is quite a laborious task to look up matters of this character, and I could not undertake to furnish you with the information desired for a less sum that a fee of $25.00, on receipt of the amount I will gladly take the matter up and ascertain what the records in this office show in reference to the Loves, I have quite recently been interest in an other branch of this same family and have a great deal of information already compiled. Yours very truly, John Crosby, Deputy Clerk. Note: This is the place from which great-grandfather, Robert Love, came, and doubtless these records show a vast amount of information that I have not yet ascertained. It is not an established fact as to the exact number of brothers that this Robert Love had, nor has it been ascertained definitely that Daniel Love was his grandfather,...

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Letter from Col. Robert Love to Thomas Dillard Love – 27 July 1813

Waynesville (N.C.) July 27th, 1813. Dear Thomas: I have heard nothing from you latterly; What are your reasons for not writing more to me? I am at a loss to conjecture. The last account was by Robert Love(Who is he?-F.D. Love), and at that time you had scarcely recovered from your illness. Currency is given to a report which reached this place about two weeks ago; that Samuel had enlisted himself as a common soldier. Great God? what a delirium or delusion has his mind gotten into, if that is the case; for let a man’s patriotism or love of country, be what it may, he ought first to study his individual situation, for what benefits could our common Country derive from anything that he could do that would counter-balance against the evils which must inevitable flow from a separation from a helpless family, such as his is, independent of his inability as to bodily strength to undergo the fatigues of an army. Those are considerations which ought to enter into the minds of every person before he engages into the army. I cannot describe to you the astonishment is excited in my mind on hearing the report, & in fact, it has measurably rendered me unfit for any kind of business; for my mind is so strongly agitated that I cannot shake it off, or relieve my mind...

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Letter from Col. Robert Love to Thomas Dillard Love

Letter to Thomas Dillard Love from Col. Robert Love while he was on his way to West Tennessee, in the year 1812, where he had a vast interest in lands. This letter throws some light on the location of his brother, James, or whom, and of whose descendants, there is little known at present, but which I hope to learn of later on, if possible, and which, if I do, I will incorporate in these papers-F.D. Love, Maury County, Cathy’s Creek 19th Aug 1812 Dear Thomas: I got here last night and found your Uncle James’ family all well Although’ I find some complaints in this country (& ever since I turned the Cumberland Mountain) with the Ague & fever. Yet is not considerable considering the number of inhabitants in this county. This country throughout exceeds by far any other I have ever seen to produce. It is astonishing, to with the corn crops here this year, and every thing else grows very luxuriantly as well as corn. It is said, and generally believed, that any quantity of corn can be purchased all over the country as low as fifty cents per bushel. I wish you to inform General Taylor to come on with all speed, if he has not started, as I do not know how to act, having no power from him, and do not want to...

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Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love – 29 Nov. 1813

Soc***Grove, 29 Nov. 1813 Dear Thomas: I am told that you are very attentive and study very hard. The first, I am well pleased with, but your study ought to be so regulated as not to injure either your mind or health. I wish you would pay a little more attention to writing & spelling. If you appropriate only two hours in each day you might improve yourself much, and it might also be beneficial by relieving your mind when it is fatigued, which it is as liable to as the body after excessive labor. Learning to write a good hand will qualify you for public life by writing fair you may fill offices that may be lucrative, and such as you nor no other person can fill with dignity without that art. I have not sent you a saddle by the Boys owing to a neglect of mine when I was in Asheville last; and I think not prudent to trust to them to choose you one, for you ought to have a good one, therefore the first time I go to Asheville I will either purchase you one, if I see any that I think will suit, or otherwise, I will get Westall to make you one, and as soon afterwards as a good opportunity offers, I will send it over to you, until which time you...

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Thomas Dillard – Will

(23 Sep 1874) In the Name of God, Amen! I, Thomas Dillard, of the County of Washington, in the State of North Carolina, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament: First, I lend to my wife during her natural life, or widowhood, the whole of my Negroes, except those given by legacy, but in case of her marriage, that the help of said Negroes descend and be divided amongst my children here named: to Ben Dillard, Wennesoppea, Mary Ann, Thomas, Stacy, Martha, Amy, John and Rebecca, and the other part with all the stock and movable at my said wife’s death to be divided equally amongst the aforesaid children. Second, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Elizabeth Anthony, Negro Inda, with her increase. I let her have at the same time and do devise, that is all I do intend for her to have of my estate. Third, I give and bequeath to my son, Benja. Dillard, Negro Piler and Joe, with the Virginia Bond Warrant for one thousand acres of land what I have already delivered to my said son with the Negroes aforesaid, and do declare that to be all that I do intend for him to have of my estate and lands. Fourth, I give to my daughter, Wennesoppea, a Negro called Cloe and one called Spence. Fifth, I give and bequeath...

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Letter from John Bell Love to Thomas Dillard Love

Copy of a Letter from John Bell Love to Thomas Dillard Love, his brother, and now in my possession.-F.D.Love Waynesville, Nov. 18th, _____ Dear Brother: I hasten to mention the official dispatch received from our Ministers a few days ago; after entering on the negotiations with the British Ministers; it was explicitly demanded by the British Commissioners as a sine quo non as the only condition on which they were instructed to treat with America that the United States should undo a way a large portion of the State of Ohio & Territories adjacent, as well as a portion of the Eastern parts of Massachusetts, & the obligation to keep up no defenses either by land or water; on these conditions they are willing to make peace. I hope every man in the nation will unite in the struggle which is to determine whether the nations are to remain free or be enslaved. We once bought the same proud fool to yield to justice, & we are fully able for the task now. I am, With love & Respect, &c. John Bell Love, (Addressed) Capt. Thomas D. Love. Favor per Carter County, William C. Love East...

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Letter from Col. Robert Love to Dillard Love

Letter from Col. Robert Love to his son, Dillard Love, who was then visiting Thomas D. Love, in East Tennessee. Waynesville, 6th, of Nov. 1815. Dear Dillard: I wish you would hurry business as much as possible. Everything here is in a bad way. I am confined down with a strained ankle. John starts tomorrow with steers to Charlestown in company with his cousin, James. William is now at a Writing School held in the Court House by a Maj(?) Porter and a Mr. Milligan, and James are in the store in the absence of Mr. Moore, who is now in South Carolina. We have this morning commenced gathering our corn. I returned from Dobson’s on Tuesday last. We have two loads of cider to draw from there this fall, which will, with other business, keep us extremely busy. The Steers for feeding ought soon to be had up. I am afraid that things will go slowly on until I can get about myself. I have not a chance to write to your grandmother, which I wish to do. I wish it was possible that you could prevail on her to spend her last days with us; I know she could be more comfortably taken care of by her daughter and myself that to remain in her present situation. She must be so infirm as to need considerable assistance....

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Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love

Letter from Robert Love to Thomas D. Love. Waynesville, 2nd day of November 1814 Dear Thomas: I have sent you by Dillard one hundred and fifty dollars in Bank Notes, which is all Mr. Carsons declares he could raise, having tried to borrow at several place. Those that are on this State’s Banks I flatter myself you can change in Asheville as you pass through. The balance of $150. I will pay you at our next Superior Court, which is the time his(Carsons) note is due to me; he purchased 23 head of steers, and, for which, he gave me $408. I flatter myself that you & Sammy will use every exertion in getting my wagon Ironed. I know I could and would have had such a job for either of you completed long ago, if the same means and opportunities could be under my influence. I hope you are well, as we are at this time. You had best list the Bank Notes as to date & NO. Particularizing the Bank upon which they have issued and *****as the same stating from who recd. Since writing the above I have exchanged two $10. Notes of this State’s Bank for twenty dollar note on the State Bank of South Carolina, which you find of No. 2 & dated the 2nd, of October 1813-this note I had from John Howell....

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