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Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

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Treaty of August 20, 1851

TREATY MADE AND CONCLUDED AT CAMP LU-PI-YU-MA, AT CLEAR LAKE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 20, 1851, BETWEEN REDICK McKEE, INDIAN AGENT ON THE PART OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE CHIEFS, CAPTAINS AND HEAD MEN OF THE CA-LA-NA-PO, HA-BI-NA-PO, ETC., ETC., TRIBES OF INDIANS. A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Camp Lu-pi-yu-ma, on the south side of Clear Lake, between Redick McKee, one of the Indian agents specially appointed to make treaties with the various Indian tribes in California, on the part of the United States, and the under-signed chiefs, captains and head men of the tribes or bands of Indians now in council at this camp, known as the Ca-la-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Ju-lio and captains; Ha-bi-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Pri-e-to and his captains; Da-no-ha-bo tribe, represented by the chief, Ku-kee; Mo-al-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Mob-shah and his captains; the co-tribe, represented by the chief, Cal-i-a-him and his captains; How-ku-ma tribe, represented by the chief, Chi-bec and his captains; Cha-nel-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Con-chu; and the Me-dam-a-dec tribe, represented by the chief, Co-e~u-e. ARTICLE 1. The said tribes or bands acknowledge themselves, jointly and severally, under the exclusive jurisdiction, authority, and protection of the United States, and hereby bind themselves to refrain hereafter from the commission of all acts of hostility and aggression towards the government...

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History of Arapaho and Cheyenne Treaties

These treaties were instrumental in establishing and defining the relationship between the United States and the Arapaho and Cheyenne Confederation. They also impacted the history of the tribe after it signed the initial treaty of 1825. Each succeeding treaty will show the historian a shrinking land mass controlled by the Arapaho and Cheyenne. Includes land cession maps detailing the land ceded by the Arapaho and Cheyenne.

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Treaty of December 17, 1801

Concluded December 17th, 1801, Between The Choctaw Nation And The United States. Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, by James Wilkerson, of the State of Maryland,, brigadier general in the army of the United States, Benjamin Hawkins, of North Carolina, and Andrew Pickens, of South Carolina, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States, on the one part, and the Mingoes, principal men and; warriors of the Choctaw Nation, representing the said Nation in council assembled, on the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz.: Article 1st. Whereas, the United States in Congress, assembled, did, by their commissioners plenipotentiary, Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, and Joseph Martin, at a treaty held with the chiefs and head men of the Choctaw Nation at Hopewell, on the Keowee, Julie 30th, 1786, give peace to the said Nation, and receive it into, the favor and protection of the United States of America; it is agreed by the parties to these presents respectively, that the Choctaw Nation, or such part of it as may reside within the limits of the United States, shall be and continue under the care and protection of the said United States; and that the mutual confidence and friendship which are hereby acknowledged to subsist between the contracting” parties, shall be maintained and perpetuated. Article 2nd. The Mingoes, principal men, and warriors of the Choctaw...

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Agreement of October 17, 1802

Concluded October 17, 1802, Between The Choctaw Nation And The United States. A provisional convention, entered into and made by Brigadier General James Wilkerson, of the State of Maryland, commissioner for holding conferences with the Indians south of the Ohio river, in behalf of the United States, on the one part, and the whole Choctaw Nation, by their chiefs, -head men, and principal warriors, on the other part. Preamble: For the mutual accommodation of the parties, and to perpetuate that concord and friendship, which so happily subsists between them, they do hereby freely, voluntarily, and without constraint, covenant and agree: Article 1st. That the President of the United States may, at his discretion, by a commissioner or commissioners, to be appointed by him, by and with the advice and con sent of the Senate of the United States, retrace, connect, and plainly remark the old line of limits, established by and between his Britannic majesty and the said Choctaw nation, which begins on the left bank of the Chickasaw hay river, and runs thence in an easterly direction to the right bank of the Tombigbee River, terminating on the same, at a bluff, well-known by the name of Hacha Tiggeby (corruption of Hacha toh bichi. You are very white,) but it is to be clearly understood, that two commissioners, to be appointed, by the said nation, from their own...

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Agreement of August 31, 1803

Concluded August 31st, 1803, Between The Choctaw Nation And The United States. To whom these presents shall come: Know ye, that the undersigned commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one part, and the whole Choctaw Nation of the other part, being duff authorized by the President of the United States, and by the chiefs and head men of said Nation, do hereby establish, in conformity to the convention of Fort Confederation, for the line of demarcation recognized in said convention, the following metes and bounds, viz: Beginning at the channel of the Hatched at the point where the line of limits between the United States and Spain crossed the same, thence up the channel of said river to the confluence of the Chickasaw-hay (corruption of Chikasahha) and Buckhatannee (corruption of Buchchah, a range of hills) and Hantah (to be bright) rivers, thence up the channel of the Buchhatannee to Boque Hooma (corruption of Bokhumma, Red Creek, thence up said creek to a pine tree standing on the left bank of the same, and blazed on two of its sides, about twelve links southwest of an old trading path, leading from the town of Mobile to the Hewanee towns, much worn, but not in use at the present time. From this tree we find the following bearings and distances, viz: south 54 degrees 30 minutes west,...

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Signers of Native American Treaties

This unique database comprises a list of all signers of each specific treaty, whether the signer be white or Native American. To search for a white ancestor, place their name in the Surname and/or given (first) name below. To search for a Native American ancestor try the Indian and Other searches, each one separately.

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Indian Treaties Caddo to Crow

Treaties for the Caddo, Cahokia, Calapooia, Cayuga, Cayuse, Chasta, Cherokee, Cheyenne Chickasaw, Chippewa, Choctaw, Christian Indians, Clack-A-Mas, Columbia Colville, Comanche, Creek, and Crow Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Caddo Treaties (Cadoe) Treaty of July 1, 1835 Treaty of May 15, 1846 Cahokia Treaties Treaty of September 25, 1818 Calapooia Treaties (Kalapuya) Treaty of January 22, 1855 Treaty of November 29, 1854 Cayuga Treaties Treaty of October 22, 1784 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Agreement of August 23, 1792 Treaty of January 5, 1838 Cayuse Treaties Treaty of June 9, 1855 Chasta Treaties Treaty of November 18, 1854 Cherokee Treaties Treaty of November 28, 1785 Treaty of July 2, 1791 Treaty of June 26, 1794 Treaty of October 2, 1798 Treaty of October 24, 1804 Treaty of October 25, 1805 Treaty of October 27, 1805 Treaty of January 7, 1806 Elucidation of a Convention, September 11, 1807 Treaty of September 8, 1815 Treaty of March 22, 1816 Second Treaty of March 22, 1816 Treaty of September 14, 1816 Treaty of July 8, 1817 Treaty of February 27, 1819 Treaty of May 6, 1828 Treaty of February 14, 1833 Agreement of March 14, 1835 Treaty of August 24, 1835 Treaty of December 29, 1835 Treaty of August 6, 1846 Agreement of September 13, 1865 Treaty of July 19, 1866 Treaty of April 27, 1868 Cheyenne Treaties...

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Treaty of October 19, 1818

Treaty with the Chickasaws, to settle all territorial controversies, and to remove all ground of complaint or dissatisfaction, that might arise to interrupt the peace and harmony which have so long and so happily existed between the United States of America and the Chickesaw nation of Indians, James Monroe, President of the said United States, by Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson, of the one part, and the whole Chickesaw nation, by their chiefs, head men, and warriors, in full council assembled, of the other part, have agreed on the following articles; which, when ratified by the President and Senate of the United States of America, shall form a treaty binding on all parties. Article I. Peace and friendship are hereby firmly established and made perpetual, between the United States of America and the Chickesaw nation of Indians. Article II. To obtain the object of the foregoing article, the Chickesaw nation of Indians cede to the United States of America, (with the exception of such reservation as shall be hereafter mentioned,) all claim or title which the said nation has to the land lying north of the south boundary of the state of Tennessee, which is bounded south by the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude, and which lands, hereby ceded, lies within the following boundary, viz:      Beginning on the Tennessee river, about thirty-five miles, by water, below colonel George Colbert’s...

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Treaty of August 4, 1825

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Crow tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head men and Warriors, of the said Crow tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe, of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Crow tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection.—The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Crow tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to time, such benefits and acts of kindness as may be convenient, and seem...

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Treaty of July 29, 1837

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Peters (the confluence of the St. Peters and Mississippi rivers) in the Territory of Wisconsin, between the United States of America, by their commissioner, Henry Dodge, Governor of said Territory, and the Chippewa nation of Indians, by their chiefs and headmen. Article 1. The said Chippewa nation cede to the United States all that tract of country included within the following boundaries: Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers, between twenty and thirty miles above where the Mississippi is crossed by the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude, and running thence to the north point of Lake St. Croix, one of the sources of the St. Croix river; thence to and along the dividing ridge between the waters of Lake Superior and those of the Mississippi, to the sources of the Ocha-sua-sepe a tributary of the Chippewa river; thence to a point on the Chippewa river, twenty miles below the outlet of Lake De Flambeau; thence to the junction of the Wisconsin and Pelican rivers; thence on an east course twenty-five miles; thence southerly, on a course parallel with that of the Wisconsin river, to the line dividing the territories of the Chippewas and Menomonies; thence to the Plover Portage; thence along the southern boundary of the Chippewa country, to the commencement of the boundary line dividing...

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Treaty of June 16, 1820

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at the Saúlt de St. Marie, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States, by their Commissioner Lewis Cass, and the Chippeway tribe of Indians. Article I.The Chippeway tribe of Indians cede to the United States the following tract of land: Beginning at the Big Rock, in the river St. Mary’s, on the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada; and, running thence, down the said river, with the middle thereof, to the Little Rapid; and, from those points, running back from the said river, so as to include sixteen square miles of land. Article II.The Chippeway tribe of Indians acknowledge to have received a quantity of goods in full satisfaction of the preceding cession. Article III. The United States will secure to the Indians a perpetual right of fishing at the falls of St. Mary’s, and also a place of encampment upon the tract hereby ceded, convenient to the fishing ground, which place shall not interfere with the defenses of any military work which may be erected, nor with any private rights. Article IV. This treaty, after the same shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be obligatory on the contracting parties. In witness whereof, the said Lewis Cass,...

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Treaty of September 24, 1819

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Saginaw, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioner, Lewis Cass, and the Chippewa nation of Indians. Article I. The Chippewa nation of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby, forever, cede to the United States the land comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point in the present Indian boundary line, which runs due north from the mouth of the great Auglaize river, six miles south of the place where the base line, so called, intersects the same; thence, west, sixty miles; thence, in a direct line, to the head of Thunder Bay River; thence, down the same, following the courses thereof, to the mouth; thence, northeast, to the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada; thence, with the same, to the line established by the treaty of Detroit, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seven; thence, with the said line, to the place of beginning. Article II. From the cession aforesaid the following tracts of land shall be reserved, for the use of the Chippewa nation of Indians: One tract, of eight thousand acres, on the east side of the river Au Sable, near where the Indians now live. One tract, of...

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Elucidation of a Convention, September 11, 1807

Elucidation of a convention with the Cherokee Nation, September 11, 1807. Whereas, by the first article of a convention between the United States and the Cherokee nation, entered into at the city of Washington, on the seventh day of January, one thousand eight hundred and six, it was intended on the part of the Cherokee nation, and so understood by the Secretary of War, the commissioner on the part of the United States, to cede to the United States all the right, title and interest which the said Cherokee nation ever had to a tract of country contained between the Tennessee river and the Tennessee ridge (so called); which tract of country had since the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety four, been claimed by the Cherokees and Chickasaws: the eastern boundary whereof is limited by a line so to be run from the upper part of the Chickasaw Old Fields, as to include all the waters of Elk river, any thing expressed in said convention to the contrary notwithstanding. It is therefore now declared by James Robertson and Return J. Meigs, acting under the authority of the executive of the United States, and by a delegation of Cherokee chiefs, of whom Eunolee or Black Fox, the king or head chief of said Cherokee nation, acting on the part of, and in behalf of said nation, is one,...

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Indian Treaties Aionai to Assinaboine

Treaties for: Aionai, Anadarko, Apache, Appalachicola, Arapaho, Arikara, and Assinaboine Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Aionai Treaties (I-On-I) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Anadarko Treaties (Ana-Da-Ca) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Apache Treaties Treaty of July 1, 1852 Treaty of October 17, 1865 Treaty of July 27, 1853 Treaty of October 21, 1867 Memorandum to Treaty of October 21, 1867 Appalachicola Treaty of October 11, 1832 Treaty of June 18, 1833 Arapaho (Arrapahoe, Arapahoe) Treaty of September 17, 1851 Treaty of February 15, 1861 Treaty of October 14, 1865 Treaty of October 17, 1865 Treaty of October 28, 1867 Treaty of April 29, 1868 Treaty of May 10, 1868 Treaty of September 17, 1851 Arikara (Ricara, Arickaree) Treaty of July 18, 1825 Treaty of September 17, 1851 Agreement of July 17, 1866 Assinaboine Treaty of September 17,...

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