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The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine

The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine traces from John Dow and Johan Coop of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. The first descendant in America, Henry Dow, came from England to America in 1637 with his wife, four children, and a maid. He first settled at Watertown, Massachusetts before relocating to Hampton, New Hampshire. He wrote his surname variously as Dow, Dow and Doue. One of the first Dow to settle in Avon, was Joshua, son of John and Betsey (Strout) Dow, who moved from Portland to Avon soon after his brother and sister, and settled before 1828 near Mt. Blue and Mt. Blue Pond.

Surnames: Briggs, Bryon, Crockett, Davenport, Dickey, Doue, Dow, Dowe, Dresser, Dunham, Esty, Hall, Harnden, Harradon, Hinkley, Kinney, Kittredge, Ladd, McLaughlin, Mitchell, Orberton, Pettingell, Richardson, Ross, Sampson, Sedgeley, Stinchfield, Vining, Walton, Webber, and Worthley.

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The family of Nelson Drake

The family of Nelson Drake; back to 1630, New York and Michigan pioneers, with genealogy supplement. Surnames: Allen, Barre, Bickford, Boyer, Bravender, Brosius, Brown, Christmas, Corner, Coey, Cozzi, Davis, Day, Diener, Drake, Dust, Engleberg, Fishel, Fookes, Gorton, Groce, Hawkins, Hewes, Hill, Hilton, Hirsch, Huddlestun, Kaiser, Kellogg, Langfield, Lear, Martinchak, McClellan, Point, Rae, Rayner, Ritter, Roehm, Rossi, Shilander, Smith, Soule, Stingley, Tucker, Ward, Wauvle, West, White, Wickham, and Wright.

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English and American Drakes

English and American Drakes : paper prepared and read at the Drake reunion / by Medora Corbett, Aug. 8, 1912. Also family record of two sons of Richard and Mary Wood Drake, born in Orange County, New York, by William T. Drake. The two sons are Timothy Drake (1788-1839) and Thomas Wood Drake (1794-1879).

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Exclusively yours, Eurilla

Written by Edna Dooling Herrin for her daughter Eurilla, this self-published manuscript intent was to instruct Eurilla on her ancestry, especially in the settling of Madison County, Illinois. Families mentioned: Barber, Culp, Dooling, Harris, Herrin, Judy, Pearce, Rhodes, and Walsh.

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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

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Wendell, Massachusetts: Its Settlers and Citizenry, 1752-1900

Nothing is greater than to see a relatively new genealogical manuscript make it’s way online for free. Pamela A. Richardson has graciously allowed her “Wendell, Massachusetts: Its Settlers and Citizenry, 1752-1900” to be digitized by Internet Archive and made available to the general public. The reach and expansion of this manuscript has greatly been increased by this action, and researchers of their roots in Wendell Massachusetts are greatly appreciative! Surnames featured: Baker, Ballard, Ballou, Brewer, Bufford, Burgess, Clark, Cooke, Crosby, Drury, Fiske, Glazier, Goodale, Green, Hager, Howe, Kilburn, King, Locke, Metcalf, Oakes, Orcutt, Osgood, Phelps, Sawyer, Sibley, Stebbins, Stiles, Stone, Sweetser, Tyrer, Wetherbee, and Wilder.

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The Crum family in America

The Crum family in America deals with a particular set of Crums — a set that hailed from the Lower Rhineland, Germany, and settled originally in Pennsylvania or Virginia. It does not attempt by any means to deal with all those having the name “Crum”. Our story begins with the coming of Anthony Crum, Sr. and Matthias Crum, Sr. to America.

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Epitaphs from Graveyards in Wellesley, North Natick, and St. Mary’s Churchyard

About 1860, Charles Curtis Greenwood, a local antiquarian of ability, began to copy the inscriptions in the old graveyard at Needham, and to prepare genealogical notes in reference to each person buried there. He devoted much time and correspondence to this work, and in 1890 began to publish the results of his labors in the Dedham Historical Register. At the time of his death 397 epitaphs had been published and 228 remained in manuscript, most of which were annotated. His widow conscripted George Kuhn Clark to publish the remaining inscriptions along with all of the published inscriptions in a single volume in 1898 called “Needham Epitaths.” Clark, relying on the original transcription of Charles, along with his own new transcription, re-walked all of the cemeteries, enumerating the gravestones once again. Includes genealogical notes of the people interred.

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Records of First Church in Falmouth Maine

The contents of the book on the records of First Church in Falmouth Maine were gleaned for and first appeared in the historical and genealogical columns of the Portland Evening Express. It contains a brief history of the church, followed by a list of its members from 1727 through 1855, a register of marriages from 1750 through 1853, and an alphabetical list of baptisms, presumably from the organization of the church. The appendix, comprising exactly half of the book, is made up of historical information, both ecclesiastical and secular, relating to Falmouth and its vicinity.

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Chronicles of New Haven Green, from 1638 to 1862

This volume is made up, as the title indicates, of eight papers, now revised and partly rewritten, to each of which are added notes supplying a page or two of comment or explanation. The papers treat respectively of the Green as a public square, a political and civic forum, a religious and ecclesiastical arena, a parade ground, a seat of judicial tribunals, an educatioual campus, a market-place, and a cemetery. In a style abounding in facetiae not unworthy of Dickens, the author reviews the succession of events which have transpired in connection with the Green, with their changing scenic accompaniments of stocks, whipping-post, jail, tombstones, school-house, meeting-house, state-house; setting in prominent relief the more humorous or otherwise impressive incidents, and neglecting no occasion for satirical thrusts at contemporary folly, keenly relished by the reader, without doubt, but certain — as in all such cases — to be contemptuously slighted by those who alone might profit by them. His comparison of the “Blue laws” of Connecticut with those of the other colonies evidently affords as much satisfaction to himself as instruction to the most of his readers, justifying his declaration that the New Haven Colony can very complacently allow its laws to be called “blue in contrast with the black and crimson legislation of its contemporaries.”

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The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789

The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-17891The date should have been 1798 based upon the Register in the book. includes a register of births, baptisms and deaths, the earliest and latest recorded dates of which are April 12, 1685, and March 9, 1798. The compiler has wisely reproduced the original manuscript with “all eccentricities of abbreviation and punctuation, as well as all mistakes.” A carefully prepared index greatly adds to the usefulness of the work.

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Footnotes:   [ + ]

1. The date should have been 1798 based upon the Register in the book.

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