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United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1800-c. 1955

3,907 land management tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located. The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds) granted by the Federal Government, and other conveyances of title such as Indian allotments, internal improvement grants (to states), military bounty land warrants, private land claims, railroad grants, school grants, and swamp grants. Additional items of information included in the tract books are as follows: number of acres, date of sale, purchase price, land office, entry number, final Certificate of Purchase number, and notes on relinquishments and conversions.

Sacramento California Police Mug Books 1864-1949

Mug Books of the past have been replaced by computer databases now, but back before the days of computers and databases, they served as an effective method for Police Departments to keep track of past criminals and wanted people. The Sacramento Police Department has generously provided these scanned images to archive.org for free access to everyone. If you are not aware if one of your ancestors may have been arrested for a crime, then I suggest you first search the newspaper records available online for free of Sacramento California, so that you have a year span to choose from. Unless you’re like me and just like perusing the old mug shots…

The Massachusetts Tax Valuation List of 1771

The Massachusetts Tax Valuation List of 1771 contains the names and descriptions of taxable property of nearly 38,000 individuals who resided in 152 Massachusetts towns in 1771

New Jersey Marriage Index 1901-2016

Alec Ferretti, a budding genealogist, took upon himself the task of filing an OPRA request with the New Jersey Department of Health, seeking the marriage indices that legally should have been made available to the public (based on the law) but had not been. After being denied his request, he sought the help of genealogist’s newest friends, Reclaim the Records. They with their legal team helped Alec successfully challenge the denial, and to make this story short, though it wasn’t, they were able to get the indices available opened to the public and published on Archive.org. The setup at archive, not being conducive to a quick search, I have provided the links straight to the data, along with explanation text as provided by Reclaim the Records.

Small Town Newspapers

Small Town Papers gives you free access to the people, places and events recorded in real time over the decades or even centuries! Browse and search the scanned newspaper archive from 1846 up to the current edition! Their archives contain millions of names of ancestors not found anywhere else. Enhance your Ancestry research with their high resolution scanned newspaper archive. Find distant relatives and discover your ethnic heritage by reading the articles about family and friends written back in the day.

Free Genealogy

Boone County Indiana Genealogy

A guide and directory to Boone County Indiana genealogy, containing both online and offline resources for genealogy and historical research. This article contains sources of genealogical data about Boone County such as biographies, cemetery records, census records, church records, court records, family records, land records, military records, naturalization records, and vital records.

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

The Clayhill Church Register 1887-1939

Clayhill Church is off County Road 5511 in Brundidge, Pike County, Alabama. These images are digital representations of their complete church register covering the years of 1887-1939. This is a valuable source of genealogical information for those who comprised the membership of this church. It’s also a great complement to any transcription of it’s cemetery as it may include information on the unreadable headstones, and those who have no headstones. Included within this register are birth, baptism, death, burial and membership information. Unfortunately there was no marriage information recorded.

Free Massachusetts Town Vital Records

This is a collection of 191 free town vital records books, otherwise known as “Tan Books” for Massachusetts towns. Generally these records go up to 1849/1850 at which, the genealogist can use the census records to assist in identifying the family connections further. Included with this article is an account of why and how these manuscripts were published.

Memoirs of a French Village: a chronicle of old Prairie du Rocher, 1722-1972

In summarizing or evaluating the history of Prairie du Rocher, one must note the impact that historical events and influences have made on present day, Prairie du Rocher. The community is today, as it was in the 1700′ s, basically an agricultural community. The farmers no longer live in the village, but they remain the basic economic factor in the village. The farm lands which surround Prairie du Rocher, are among the most fertile and bountiful soils in the world. The limestone bluffs, from which the French obtained stone for the construction of Fort Chartres, today provide livelihood for many of the villagers. The cemetery in which the inhabitants bury their dead in 1972 is the same one in which their ancestors buried their loved ones as early as 1722. The rock bluffs and the wide Mississippi River isolate the community from the outside world today, as they did in the early years. The mosquitoes remain as numerous and voracious as they were in 1839; and the damp, wet, unbearable, and unhealthy conditions return during the wet months. The population today is approximately 750, a gain of only 250 since 1859, over a hundred years ago. The old, distinctly French names such as Barbeau, Bievenue, Langlois, Louviere, De Rousse, and Duclos, still appear on the village registers, but the influence of the French is not limited to the inheritance of names. Over 90% of the residents today, belong to the Roman Catholic Church. The Church remains the center of the community. The majority of the villagers today, are complacent, contented, unambitious, good-natured, and happy – traits directly traceable to their ancestors. Most of the villagers remain to an amazing degree, as Montague described it, “free from that strife, contention, and turmoil, which attends the pursuit of wealth and political preferment.” In order to observe this living historical heritage, one need only attend the annual church picnic, rendezvous, or witness the group of villagers dressed in 18th century costumes, on New Year’s Eve, who move from house to house proclaiming the end of another year, in the old familiar words of the La Gui-annee.

Seneca County New York Genealogy

A guide and directory to Seneca County New York genealogy, containing both online and offline resources for genealogy and historical research. This article contains sources of genealogical data about Seneca County such as biographies, cemetery records, census records, church records, court records, family records, land records, military records, naturalization records, and vital records.

Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

History of the Indian Wars

Our relations with the aboriginal inhabitants of this continent form a distinct and very important, and interesting portion of the history of this Republic. It is unfortunately, for the most part, a history of bloody wars, in which the border settlers have suffered all the horrors of savage aggression, and, in which portions of our colonial settlements have sometimes been completely cut off and destroyed. Other portions of this thrilling history, evince the courage, daring, and patience of the settlers, in a very favorable point of view, and exhibit them as triumphing over every difficulty, and finally obtaining a firm foothold on the soil. In all its parts, this history will always possess numerous points of peculiar interest for the American reader.

Autauga County Alabama Genealogy

An extensive collection of material relating to Autauga County Alabama genealogy, includes vital records, cemeteries, census, history, and other records.

The Migration of Voyageurs from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene in 1828

The story of the transfer of the British garrison from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene in 1828 and the migration of voyageurs connected with the post has never been told in print. In the following notes Mr. Osborne has endeavored to gather this story from the lips of the few survivors who migrated at that time. Descendants of French-Canadians largely predominated in this movement, but we also get glimpses of what a strange and heterogeneous people once gathered around Mackinaw and Drummond Island, especially about the time of the coalition of the two fur companies in 1821. The migrant voyageurs settled principally near Penetanguishene, in the township of Tiny, Simcoe County. Offshoots of the band settled at Old Fort Ste. Marie, at Fesserton and Coldwater, and another south of Lake Simcoe, near Pefferlaw, York County. These notes will form a useful supplement to Joseph Taase’s “Les Canadiens de l’Ouest.”

Registers of the Parish of Michilimackinac

The records from the register at Michilimackinac are here provided as they were translated by Edward O. Brown back in 1889. His translation came from a transcript of the original, which latter is kept in the parish church of Ste. Anne, at Mackinac. Annotated throughout are Mr. Brown’s biographical knowledge of the events of Michilimackinac and the people within. Don’t pass over the footnotes for the record, you may find a biographical reference hidden there!

The Canadian Biographical Dictionary

The Canadian Biographical Dictionary contains 527 biographies of men who were deemed by the publishers to be representative of all who took part in the social, intellectual, and material progress of the Country of Canada. Our presentation currently consists of volume 1 only, which was specifically devoted to the County of Ontario.

Free Genealogy Archives

The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine

The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine traces from John Dow and Johan Coop of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. The first descendant in America, Henry Dow, came from England to America in 1637 with his wife, four children, and a maid. He first settled at Watertown, Massachusetts before relocating to Hampton, New Hampshire. He wrote his surname variously as Dow, Dow and Doue. One of the first Dow to settle in Avon, was Joshua, son of John and Betsey (Strout) Dow, who moved from Portland to Avon soon after his brother and sister, and settled before 1828 near Mt. Blue and Mt. Blue Pond.

Surnames: Briggs, Bryon, Crockett, Davenport, Dickey, Doue, Dow, Dowe, Dresser, Dunham, Esty, Hall, Harnden, Harradon, Hinkley, Kinney, Kittredge, Ladd, McLaughlin, Mitchell, Orberton, Pettingell, Richardson, Ross, Sampson, Sedgeley, Stinchfield, Vining, Walton, Webber, and Worthley.

The family of Nelson Drake

The family of Nelson Drake; back to 1630, New York and Michigan pioneers, with genealogy supplement. Surnames: Allen, Barre, Bickford, Boyer, Bravender, Brosius, Brown, Christmas, Corner, Coey, Cozzi, Davis, Day, Diener, Drake, Dust, Engleberg, Fishel, Fookes, Gorton, Groce, Hawkins, Hewes, Hill, Hilton, Hirsch, Huddlestun, Kaiser, Kellogg, Langfield, Lear, Martinchak, McClellan, Point, Rae, Rayner, Ritter, Roehm, Rossi, Shilander, Smith, Soule, Stingley, Tucker, Ward, Wauvle, West, White, Wickham, and Wright.

English and American Drakes

English and American Drakes : paper prepared and read at the Drake reunion / by Medora Corbett, Aug. 8, 1912. Also family record of two sons of Richard and Mary Wood Drake, born in Orange County, New York, by William T. Drake. The two sons are Timothy Drake (1788-1839) and Thomas Wood Drake (1794-1879).

Exclusively yours, Eurilla

Written by Edna Dooling Herrin for her daughter Eurilla, this self-published manuscript intent was to instruct Eurilla on her ancestry, especially in the settling of Madison County, Illinois. Families mentioned: Barber, Culp, Dooling, Harris, Herrin, Judy, Pearce, Rhodes, and Walsh.

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Wendell, Massachusetts: Its Settlers and Citizenry, 1752-1900

Nothing is greater than to see a relatively new genealogical manuscript make it’s way online for free. Pamela A. Richardson has graciously allowed her “Wendell, Massachusetts: Its Settlers and Citizenry, 1752-1900” to be digitized by Internet Archive and made available to the general public. The reach and expansion of this manuscript has greatly been increased by this action, and researchers of their roots in Wendell Massachusetts are greatly appreciative! Surnames featured: Baker, Ballard, Ballou, Brewer, Bufford, Burgess, Clark, Cooke, Crosby, Drury, Fiske, Glazier, Goodale, Green, Hager, Howe, Kilburn, King, Locke, Metcalf, Oakes, Orcutt, Osgood, Phelps, Sawyer, Sibley, Stebbins, Stiles, Stone, Sweetser, Tyrer, Wetherbee, and Wilder.

The Crum family in America

The Crum family in America deals with a particular set of Crums — a set that hailed from the Lower Rhineland, Germany, and settled originally in Pennsylvania or Virginia. It does not attempt by any means to deal with all those having the name “Crum”. Our story begins with the coming of Anthony Crum, Sr. and Matthias Crum, Sr. to America.

Epitaphs from Graveyards in Wellesley, North Natick, and St. Mary’s Churchyard

About 1860, Charles Curtis Greenwood, a local antiquarian of ability, began to copy the inscriptions in the old graveyard at Needham, and to prepare genealogical notes in reference to each person buried there. He devoted much time and correspondence to this work, and in 1890 began to publish the results of his labors in the Dedham Historical Register. At the time of his death 397 epitaphs had been published and 228 remained in manuscript, most of which were annotated. His widow conscripted George Kuhn Clark to publish the remaining inscriptions along with all of the published inscriptions in a single volume in 1898 called “Needham Epitaths.” Clark, relying on the original transcription of Charles, along with his own new transcription, re-walked all of the cemeteries, enumerating the gravestones once again. Includes genealogical notes of the people interred.

Records of First Church in Falmouth Maine

The contents of the book on the records of First Church in Falmouth Maine were gleaned for and first appeared in the historical and genealogical columns of the Portland Evening Express. It contains a brief history of the church, followed by a list of its members from 1727 through 1855, a register of marriages from 1750 through 1853, and an alphabetical list of baptisms, presumably from the organization of the church. The appendix, comprising exactly half of the book, is made up of historical information, both ecclesiastical and secular, relating to Falmouth and its vicinity.

Chronicles of New Haven Green, from 1638 to 1862

This volume is made up, as the title indicates, of eight papers, now revised and partly rewritten, to each of which are added notes supplying a page or two of comment or explanation. The papers treat respectively of the Green as a public square, a political and civic forum, a religious and ecclesiastical arena, a parade ground, a seat of judicial tribunals, an educatioual campus, a market-place, and a cemetery. In a style abounding in facetiae not unworthy of Dickens, the author reviews the succession of events which have transpired in connection with the Green, with their changing scenic accompaniments of stocks, whipping-post, jail, tombstones, school-house, meeting-house, state-house; setting in prominent relief the more humorous or otherwise impressive incidents, and neglecting no occasion for satirical thrusts at contemporary folly, keenly relished by the reader, without doubt, but certain — as in all such cases — to be contemptuously slighted by those who alone might profit by them. His comparison of the “Blue laws” of Connecticut with those of the other colonies evidently affords as much satisfaction to himself as instruction to the most of his readers, justifying his declaration that the New Haven Colony can very complacently allow its laws to be called “blue in contrast with the black and crimson legislation of its contemporaries.”

The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789

The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-17891The date should have been 1798 based upon the Register in the book. includes a register of births, baptisms and deaths, the earliest and latest recorded dates of which are April 12, 1685, and March 9, 1798. The compiler has wisely reproduced the original manuscript with “all eccentricities of abbreviation and punctuation, as well as all mistakes.” A carefully prepared index greatly adds to the usefulness of the work.

South Britain Connecticut Sketches and Records

This book contains much valuable genealogical data from local church records and cemeteries, and brief accounts of the following families : — Allen, Averill, Barnes, Bassett, Booth, Bradley, Bray, Canfield, Downs, Edmonds, French, Gilbert, Guthrie, Hann, Hayes, Hendryx, Hill, Mitchell, Pierce, Piatt, Post, Russell, Skeels, Stoddard, Tuttle, Wagner, Wakeley, Ward and Warner.

The History of Malden, Massachusetts, 1633-1785

This volume is the result of a careful collection and verification of facts and traditions extending over a period of more than forty-five years. It embraces the history of a New England town to the close of the Revolution — to a time when old customs and systems were disappearing and new forces in political, ecclesiastical, educational, and social affairs were springing into life. It is the story of an elder day and of a life in which much appears that is strange to a later age. If we read it aright we shall better understand our indebtedness to those generations whose labors and trials made possible the freedom and prosperity of the present; and we shall avoid that effusive worship of the fathers which is a fashion rather than the result of a knowledge of the true character of the past in its weaknesses and strength.

Genealogy of the Shanks family in America

David Shanks is descended from Thomas Shanks, who was living in Washington Township, York County, Pennsylvania by 1763 when he first appears on a land warrant there. The genealogy then deals with the descendants of David and Hannah Morrison Shanks of Amsterdam, Botetourt County, Virginia, the second son of said Thomas.

Genealogy: Stitgen, Steele, Doane, Newman, Rapp

The Stitgen family comprises most of the book, and starts with Theodor and Barbare (Wollgrafs) Stutgen (the family would variously spell their name as Stutgen, Stuttgen, Stuettgen, and Stitgen.) Theodore Stitgen, grandson of Theodor Stutgen would immigrate to Richfield, Wisconsin about 1850 and eventually settled in Hillsboro, Oregon.

The Doane family starts with Christina Barnet from Annandale Scotland, who’s husband _____ Doane, died while in Scotland. She settled in Waunakee Wisconsin in 1853, with her twin sons, Andrew and Peter. The progenitor of the Rapp family, Peter and Susan (Marsh) Rapp, started in Pennsylvania and moved their family to Dane Township, Wisconsin in 1848. The Steele family starts with Robert and Nancy (Dunshee) Steele of Armagh County, Northern Ireland, who met on the voyage to America in 1801. They settled near Bovina, Delaware County, New York. The Newman family starts with John and Mary Newman of Polajewo Poland. They immigrated to America together in 1853 and settled in Madison, Wisconsin.

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Over a period of many years Mrs. Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown, early member of Linares Chapter, D.A.R., collected genealogy of her forebears. It was her wish that her work be sent to the library of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. This collection was painstakingly copied, with some additions and corrections, maintaining the same general form as used in the original notes. Elizabeth’s family originated in England moving to New England in the 1600’s. Her family lines involve many of the early lines in Connecticut, Massachusets, and New Hampshire. The families are arranged mostly in alphabetical order, and contain information from a simple direct line descendancy, to more elaborate genealogy.

Major families researched include: Alverson, Arms, Arnold, Ballou, Barden, Barker, Barnard, Bassett, Belden, Benedict, Betts, Blakeslee, Blanchard, Bradstreet, Brigham, Bronson, Buckmaster, Bull, Butterfield, Carpenter, Clark, Clerke, Cooke, Coombs, Cornwall, Corbin, Curitss, Dickerman, Dickson, Doolittle, Downey, Dudley, Eastman, Easton, Errington, Evarts, Fairbank, Foote, Gilbert, Goodrich, Graves, Gregory, Groves, Hale, Hand, Hall, Hawkes, Hawkins, Hills, Holmes, Hopkins, Hoyt, Huitt, Hurd, Keayne, Keene, Lockwood, Lupton, Lord, Manning, Marvin, Mayo, Merriman, Miller, Morris, Morton, Mosse, Moulton, Munger, Needham, Parker, Parkhurst, Potter, Peck, Pettiplace, Purefoy, Priest, Rusco, St John, Scofield, Seymour, Sherman, Smith, Strong, Swinnerton, Symonds, Threlkell, Thorne, Ventriss, Wade, Watson, Weed, White, and Yorke.

The Boyd Family of Mercelia Louise Boyd

The manuscript provides a short history of the Boyd family in ancient Scotland and of Thomas Boyd of Marsh Creek, Pennsylvania and the Manor of Maske. The genealogy of the book itself starts with William Boyd (c1700/10-1767), the immigrant, who settled in Cumberland Township in what was then York County, Pennsylvania, but is now Adams County, Pennsylvania. This manuscript traces the Boyd and allied lines up to 1935. Includes the allied families of Bell, Bracken, Culler, Cunningham, Finley, Gaut, Hoover, Hough, Markley, McGrew, Parrish, Perry, Pinkerton, Scholl, Speer, Warfel, Welday, Williams

Fisher Genealogical History

This manuscript starts with Sebastian Fisher, a native of Germany, with his wife Susanna and their two small children, embarked for England at Rotterdam, Holland, on July 28, 1708. The family came with the intention of settling on land in the Schoharie Valley in New York, but found on arrival that they did not hold legal tender to the land, since the land was not first purchased from the Native Americans. Sebastian then moved with other German immigrants who had also purchased land to the Tulpehocken Valley of Pennsylvania, where he settled his family. The 76 pages of the manuscript take some of the descendants of Sebastian and Susanna Fisher into the 20th century.

Historical sketches of N.E. Fremont Twp., Cedar Lk., Ray, Clear Lk., Michigan border, Steuben County, Indiana

Historical sketches of N.E. Fremont Twp., Cedar Lk., Ray, Clear Lk., Michigan border, Steuben County, Indiana. Included with these books is a separate manuscript called “William Duguid Descendants and History in America.” This manuscript starts at image 653 of 886 in volume 1. Volume 2 contains the Cedar Lake Congregation Session Records 1841-1892 and Deeds, Documents and Letters concerning the William Duguid descendants. Both volumes contain historical articles and remembrances concerning the area in Steuben County Indiana.

Footnotes:   [ + ]

1. The date should have been 1798 based upon the Register in the book.

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