Wyoming


Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames

ANDERSON, Noble Gordon, Watertender 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Evelyn Twila Anderson, 810 S. 3d St., Laramie.



Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – L Surnames

LANE, Edward Wallace, Coxswain, USN. Mother, Mrs. Lillian Louise Robertson, 115 W. 3d Ave., Cheyenne. LARSON, Everett William Motor Machinist’s Mate 1c, USNR. Father, Mr. Carl Joseph Larson, 717 Birch St., Rawlins. LARSON, Joseph Ernest, Fireman 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Carrie M. Larson, Rt. 5, Box 13, Douglas. LINTON, George Edward, Fireman 2c, USN. Father,



Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – Y Surnames

YOKOM, Elmore F., Sgt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Bessie M. Yokom, P.O. Box 414, Gillette. YOUNG, Samuel A., Sgt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Ruth B. Young, Alcova Rt. Casper.



Biography of Charles J. Price

Topeka had in Charles J. Price as a resident one of the most capable mining engineers of the country. His had been an experience very much out of the ordinary. Nearly forty years ago he was a mine worker in the Black Hill region. He had a practical working knowledge of the mincral sections of



Red Cloud

Far away in Wyoming lived the Sioux Indians, a fierce and warlike tribe. They called themselves Dakotas; but their enemies said that when they fought they did everything in a mean, hidden way so that it was hard to know what to expect, and they called them Sioux, which means “snake-like-ones.” To this tribe belonged



Biography of Paul Helmer Young

Paul Helmer Young, representative of the bond department of the National Bank of Commerce at St. Louis and president of the St. Louis Junior Chamber of Commerce, is one of the most alert, wide-awake and progressive of the young business men of the city. He was born in Lander, Wyoming, July 26, 1896. He is



Pawnee Indians

Pawnee Indians. The name is derived by some from the native word pariki, “a horn,” a term said to be used to designate their peculiar manner of dressing the scalp lock; but Lesser and Weltfish (1932) consider it more likely that it is from parisu, “hunter,” as claimed by themselves. They were also called Padani



Kiowa Apache Indians

Kiowa Apache Indians. The name is derived from that of the Kiowa and from the circumstance that they spoke a dialect related to those of the better-known Apache tribes, though they had no other connection with them. Also called: Bad-hearts, by Long (1823). (See Kaskaias.) Cancey or Kantsi, meaning “liars,” applied by the Caddo to



Kiowa Indians

The best-known historic location of the Kiowa Indians was a plot of territory including contiguous parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.



Ute Indians

Ute Indians. In central and western Colorado and all of eastern Utah, including the eastern part of Salt Lake Valley and Utah Valley and extending into the upper drainage area of the San Juan River in New Mexico.



Newsletter Signup

We currently provide two newsletters. Why not take both for a run?

Genealogy Update: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new, or significantly updated, collection or database on our website.

Circle of Nations: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new (or significantly updated) Native American collection or database on our website.

Once you've clicked on the Subscribe button above you'll receive an email from us requesting confirmation. You must confirm the email before you will be able to receive any newsletter.