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1863 Settlers to Beaverhead County, Montana

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William B. Carter, born in Ohio April 23, 1840. At the age of 223 years he came to Montana with a horse-team, and established himself on Alder Creek, freighting goods from Salt Lake for 4 or 5 years, in company with E. C. Bennett, who came with him from Ohio. Bennett died. Carter married Anna B. Selway in 1868, and settled at Dillon.

Frederick Temple, born in Germany Aug. 14, 1840, came to America an infant and lived in Ohio and Missouri until 20 years of age, then went to Colorado, following the rush to Montana in 1863. Mined in Alder gulch and Prickly Pear Valley until 1866, when he went to Indian Creek. In 1867 he took a farm near Radersburg, and married Sorate Richards in 1874.

Archie Macumber, born in New York Dec. 1, 1838, removed to Mich, when a boy, and resided there till 1859. Went from Colorado to New Mexico, and returning, went to the Salmon River mines. Made some valuable discoveries, and spent the winter of 1862 in Salt Lake, retuning to Virginia City in 1863, and going into freighting for two years, then selling groceries. Went to the Lemhi mines when they were discovered, and finally settled at merchandising, but sold out and secured a farm of 320 acres near Radersburg. In 1870 he married Mrs Martha Kennon.

John Brady, Bowlder Valley, born in Ireland Aug. 5, 1825, came to the U. S. in 1856, settled in Missouri, where he remained until 1860, and then went to Colorado, and to the Montana mines in the spring of 1863. On the discovery of Alder Creek placers he went there and followed mining for 5 years, after which he removed to Bowlder Valley, where he soon had 480 acres of land, 400 or 500 head of cattle, and some other stock. He married, in 1861, Anna Magillia.

William Rogers, Bowlder Valley, born in Ireland Feb. 17, 1837, came to the U. S. in 1856, remaining in New York one year, going thence to St Louis, to Colorado, and to Virginia City in 1863, then to Diamond City, where he mined for three years. He then settled in Jefferson County, where he farmed with 600 or 700 acres of land, raising horses and cattle. He married, in 1860, Anna McEntre. They were among the first settlers in North Bowlder Valley.

John Cull, Bedford, was born in England July 7, 1832, immigrated to America in 1856, and to the Colorado mines in 1861, driving an ox-team. In September 1863 he followed the rush to Alder Creek, mining on the small gulch 12 miles from Virginia City for a year, and afterward on the Blackfoot River. He then tried prospecting for new mines, and with George Detwiller discovered Basin Creek mines, and subsequently Indian Creek mines, in 1865. In 1869 he went to the Coeur d’Alene mining region, and from there to California, returning to Indian Creek and mining there until 1876, when he went to the Black Hills, and from the Black Hills to Bear Paw Mountain in 1878, and back again to the Black Hills, to Leadville, to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and finally, after stopping again at Leadville, to Indian Creek.

William Vaughn, born in Virginia Aug. 5, 1825, removed at the age of 18 years to Missouri, and in 1850 to California, returning in 1853 to Missouri. In 1850 he went to Colorado, and thence to Virginia City mines, where he remained a year, after which he mined on Indian Creek, Confederate gulch, Grizzly gulch, and Tucker gulch, returning at last to Indian Creek, where he located 50 acres of placer ground, which he mined by hydraulic apparatus, and had 500 feet of flume.

H. J. Marsh was born in Ohio April 2, 1838, and raised on a farm. Removed to Illinois in 1863, and thence to Montana the same year by overland coach. He took a farm of 320 acres on White Tail Deer Creek and met with good success raising horses.


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