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An Historical Sketch of the Tionontates or Dinondadies, now called Wyandots

The tribe which, from the time of Washington’s visit to the Ohio, in 1753, down to their removal to the West, played so important a part under the name of Wyandots, but who were previously known by a name which French write Tionontates; and Dutch, Dinondadies, have a history not uneventful, and worthy of being traced clearly to distinguish them from the Hurons or Wyandots proper, of whom they absorbed one remnant, leaving what were later only a few families near Quebec, to represent the more powerful nation.

Indian Mounds throughout North America

Charlevoix and Tantiboth speak of Indians who inhabited the region of country around Lake Michigan, who were well skilled in the art of erecting mounds and fortifications, Charlevoix also states that the Wyandots and the Six Nations disinterred their dead and took the bones from their graves where they had lain for several years and carried them to a large pit previously prepared, in which they deposited them, with the property of the deceased, filling up the pit with earth and erected a mound over it. A string of sleigh-bells much corroded, but still capable of tinkling, is said to have been found among the flint and bone implements in excavating a mound in Tennessee; while in Mississippi, at a point where De Soto is supposed to have camped, a Spanish coat-of-arms in silver, one blade of a pair of scissors, and other articles of European manufacture were found in a mound evidently which had been picked up-by some Indian after the Spaniards had gone, and buried with him at his death as being among his treasured possessions while living. Two copper plates were found in a Georgia mound, upon which were stamped figures resembling the sculptures-upon the Central American ruins, the workmanship of which is said to be far superior to that displayed in the articles of pottery, stone and bone found in the mound; though, aside from these plates nothing was found to indicate a connection between the mound builders and the Aztecs or the Pueblos. Still their origin is not inexplicable; since it is reason able to conclude that communications between the inhabitants of Central America, Mexico and the North American Indians, were...

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were occasionally forced to give food and shelter to both, which aroused the jealousy of both the Indian allies of the English and the American frontiersmen, although they preserved the strictest neutrality. In February 1772, the American settlers (nothing more could be expected) assumed to believe that the Moravian, or Christian Indians; as they were called, harbored the hostile Indians; therefore they pronounced them enemies, and at once doomed them to destruction. Accordingly on the following march, ninety volunteers, under the leadership of one David Williamson, started for Gnadenbrutten where they arrived on the morning of the 8th, and at once surrounded and entered the station; but found the most of the Indians in a field gathering corn. They told them they had come in peace and friendship, and with a proposition to move them from their unpleasant and dangerous position between the two hostile races to Fort Pitt for their better protection. The unsuspecting Indians, delighted at the suggestion of their removal to a safer place, gave up their few...

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

A Legend Of Slaughter At The Seneca Capital

A legend exists of. a fearful fight that, took pace between the Seneca and Wyandot, on their return from Braddock’s defeat, in 1755. They had fought side by side against the English army, but, no sooner had they dispersed toward their homes, than the old unsettled feud between them was renewed. The Seneca took the trail by Beaver, Mingo bottom, and west to Tuscarawas. The Wyandot took the tippler trail, striking the ridge between the heads of the Elk Eye Creek (Muskingum) and the Hioga (Cuyahoga.), where they camped. It was but a day’s journey across the present Stark County, to reach their enemies at the Seneca capital. The warriors there suspected their design, and sent Ogista, an old sachem, who met the Wyandot on the war-path, stealthily approaching the capital. He sent back a runner to give warning of their coming, and, trusting to his age for protection, boldly penetrated into the midst of the enemy, as a peacemaker. The Seneca, upon being apprised of their proximity, sallied out to fight, but were stopped by Ogista, who was returning with an agreement, made by him and the opposing chief, to the effect that each tribe should pick twenty warriors, willing to suffer death by single combat. When all were slain, they were to be covered, hatchet in hand, in one grave, and henceforth neither Seneca or Wyandot ever again were to raise a bloody hand against the other. Forty braves were soon selected, and each twenty being surrounded, the tribal war-dances were danced, and the death lamentations sung, when the way being cleared, the carnage commenced, which ended as night intervened, there being one...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

Red Jacket and the Wyandot Claim to Supremacy

At a great council of the western tribes, assembled near Detroit, prior to the late war, the celebrated Seneca orator, Red Jacket, was present, when the question of the right of the Wyandots to light the council fire, was brought up. This claim he strenuously resisted, and administered a rebuke to this nation in the following terms: “Have the Quatoghies forgotten themselves? Or do they suppose we have forgotten them? Who gave you the right in the west or east, to light the general council fire? You must have fallen asleep, and dreamt that the Six Nations were dead! Who permitted you to escape from the lower country? Had you any heart left to speak a word for yourselves? Remember how you hung on by the bushes. You had not even a place to land on. You have not yet done p___g for fear of the Konoshioni. High claim, indeed, for a tribe who had to run away from the Kadarakwa.1 “As for you, my nephews,” he continued, turning to the Lenapees, or Delawares,” it is fit you should let another light your fire. Before Miqùon came, we had put out your fire and poured water on it; it would not burn. Could you hunt or plant without our leave? Could you sell a foot of land? Did not the voice of the Long House cry, go, and you went? Had you any power at all? Fit act indeed for you to give in to our wandering brothers you, from whom we took the war-club and put on petticoats.”2 FootnotesHon. Albert H. Tracy. ↩For similar language to this, addressed to...

Wyandot and Shawnee Indian Lands

A Schedule embracing  the names of Wyandot Indians of the Incompetent Class and Orphan Class under the Wyandot Treaty of January 31, 1855, the sales of whose lands, assigned and patented to them under said Treaty, have been confirmed by the Secretary of the Interior, upon a full examination of the report of Commissioners, Irwin and Cobb dated October 3rd 1870 and hearing of the parties interested in accordance with the 15th article of the treaty of February 23rd 1867, with certain Wyandot and other Indians in Kansas. No. of AllotmentName of ReserveeAcres 201John Bigarms44 60 202Baptists Bigtown24 75 203Sallie Bigtown24 75 204William Bigtown36 50 205John Bigtree40 50 206Mary Bigtree80 50 207Catherine Bigtree39 37 209Harley Coon120 37 213Susan Hicks40 37 214Mary Coonhawk Hicks42 30 215Zachariah Longhouse80 30 216James Monture58 30 217Susan Nofat27 84 218Moses Peacock75 84 219Daniel Peacock40 84 220James Peacock40 84 221Margaret B. Punch80 84 222Eliza Punch89 84 224John H. Standingstone98 72 226Jacob Stookey50 72 227Mary B. Skybuck26 79 231Widown, George Washington27 79 232Sarah J. Washington?? ?? 234Sarah D. Williams58 79 235Mary D. Williams55 79 238Jefferson Zane40 79 240Margaret Zane75 50 243Jacob Bigelow66 10 245Washington Boyd64 75 246Joseph Cherloe40 75 247Mary Cherloe34 75 248George Cherloe33 75 249David Cherloe39 75 250Henry Cherloe40 75 251Elisabeth Cherloe90 00 254Mary Collier28 00 255Sarah Collier28 00 258Francis Coon36 00 259Mary Coon151 47 260Hannah Coon40 47 261Catharine Coon40 47 262Amos Cotter40 00 262Amos Cotter53 00 263Mary Curlyhead Jr.28 00 264Jacob Curlyhead40 00 265William A. Driver30 60 267Sarah Hicks64 60 268Henry C. Greyeyes62 60 269Margaret Jonathan Jr.124 25 271William Long27 50 272Livery B. McKenzie35 50 273Russell McKenzie50 50 274Mary McKee45 50 275Mary Monture35 00 277Isaac...

Treaty of April 1, 1850

Articles of a convention concluded in the city of Washington, this first day of April, on thousand eight hundred and fifty, by and between Ardavan S. Loughery, commissioner especially appointed by the President of the United States, and the undersigned head chief and deputies of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, duly authorized and empowered to act for their tribe. Whereas, By the treaty of March 17, 1842, between the United States and the Wyandot nation of Indians, then chiefly residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, the said nation of Indians agreed to sell and transfer, and did thereby sell and transfer, to the United States their reservations of land, one hundred and nine thousand acres of which was in the State of Ohio, and Six thousand acres were in the State of Michigan, and to remove to the west of the Mississippi River: And whereas, among other stipulations it was agreed that the United States should convey to said Indians a tract of country for their permanent settlement in the Indian territory west of the Mississippi River, to contain one hundred an [and] forty-eight thousand acres of land: And whereas, The said Indians never did receive the said one hundred and forty-eight thousand acres of land from the United States, but were forced to purchase lands from the Delaware nation of Indians, which purchase was agreed to and ratified by the United States: Now, in order to settle the claim of the Wyandot tribe of Indians to said land, the United States having appointed A. S. Loughery a commissioner on their part, who, with the undersigned...

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