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An Empty Saddle – Pvt. Clarence Spotted Wolf

“If I should be killed, I want you to bury me cession. It is pleasing to fancy the spirits of One of the hills east of the place where my brave warriors long departed watching benign grandparents and brothers and sisters only from the Happy Hunting Grounds, Other relatives are buried. As for the empty saddle — who knows? “If you have a memorial service, I want the soldiers to go ahead with the American flog. I want cowboys to follow, all on horseback. I want one of the cowboys to lend one of the wildest of the T over X horses with saddle and bridle on. “I will be riding that horse.” Such were the written instructions left by Pvt. Clarence Spotted Wolf, full-blood Gros Ventre, with his tribesmen. He was killed December 21, 1944, in Luxembourg. Pvt. Spotted Wolf was born May 18, 1914. He entered the service in January 1942, and a year later was transferred to o tank battalion. He went oversees in August 1944. On January 28, in Yellowwoods, North Dakota, the memorial service he had foreseen was held in his honor. It was on impressive ceremony. The Stars and Stripes presided over the winter bare hills where Clarence Spotted Wolf’s family and friends carried out his wishes. There were soldiers; there were cowboys; and his own saddle had been placed on the T over X horse, which was led in the procession. It is pleasing to fancy the sprits of brave warriors long departed watching benignly from the Happy Hunting Grounds. As for the empty saddle — who...

A Choctaw Leads the Guerrillas

In April 1945, after mare than three years as a guerrilla leader in the Philippines, Lt. Col. Edward Ernest McClish came home to Okmulgee, Oklahoma, where his family, who had refused to believe him dead, waited for him. Ira Wolfert has told some of his story in American Guerrilla in the Philippines, and other details have been added in a report given to the Public Relations Bureau of the War Department by Col. McClish. It is an extraordinary tale of accomplishment against great odds. Lt. Col. McClish, a Choctaw, who graduated from Haskell Institute in 1929 and from Bacone College two years later, was called to active duty in the National Guard in 1940, and early in 1941he arrived in the Philippines, where he became commander of a company of Philippine scouts. In August he went to Panay to mobilize units of the Philippine Army there, and as commander of the Third Battalion he moved his men to Negros, where they were stationed when the war broke out. Late in December they crossed by boat to Mindanao and their oil the Moro bolo battalions were added to McClish’s command. The Japanese did not reach Mindanao until April 29, 1942, shortly before the American capitulation on Luzon, and Col. McClish’s men fought them for nearly three weeks. When forces on the island finally surrendered, McClish, a casualty in the hospital, some distance from headquarters, was fortunately unable to join his men. Instead of capitulation he began to organize a guerrilla army. By September 1942, he had an organization of more than 300 soldiers, with four machine guns, 150 rifles, and...

Ceremonial Dances in the Pacific

By Ernie Pyle One of the last stories written Fay Ernie Pyle before his tragic death on le Island was about the Indians of the First Marine Division on Okinawa. It is reprinted here by permission of Scripps-Howard Newspapers and United Feature Syndicate, Inc. The ceremonial dances, according to Marine Combat Correspondent Walter Wood, included the Apache Devil Dance, the Eagle Dance, the Hoop Dance, the War Dance, and the Navajo Mountain Chant. Besides the Navajos, Sioux, Comanche, Apache, Pima, Kiowa, Pueblo, and Crow Indians took part in the Ceremonies. Okinawa — (By Navy Radio); — Back nearly two years ago when 1 was with Oklahoma’s 45th Division in Sicily and later in Italy, I learned that they had a number of Navajo Indians in communications. When secret orders had to be given over the phone these boys gave them to one an-other in Navajo. Practically nobody in the world understands Navajo except another Navajo. Well, my regiment of First Division Marines has the some thing. There are about eight Indians who do this special work. They are good Marines and are very proud of being so. There are two brothers among them, both named Joe, Their last names are the ones that are different. I guess that’s a Navajo custom, though I never knew of it before. One brother, Pfc. Joe Gatewood, went to the Indian School in Albuquerque. In fact our house is on the very same street, and Joe said it sure was good to see somebody from home. Joe has been out here three years. He is 34 and has five children bock home that...

Awards for Valor to WW2 Native Americans

Name appears under photograph Congressional Medal Of Honor Lt. Jack C. Montgomery,…………………………….. Cherokee, Oklahoma Lt. Ernest Childers,…………………………………….. Creek, Oklahoma Silver Star S/Sgt. Francis B. Brave, Sioux, Oklahoma Lt. William Sixkiller, Jr., Cherokee, Oklahoma Pfc. Warren Gullickson., Sioux, South Dakota Pfc., James R. Alexander, Lummi, Washington Cpl. Leonard Webber, Shoshone, Idaho Lt. James Sulphur, Creek, Oklahoma Sgt. Knowlton Merritt, Klamath-Modoc, Oregon T/4 Roger K. Paul, Blackfoot, Montana Sgt Perry Skenandore, Oneida, Wisconsin Pfc. Ben Quintana, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico Cpl. Vincent Village Center, Sioux, South Dakota T/Sgt. Joseph Lawrence, Sioux, South Dakota Pfc. Francis Shaw, Pointe, Nevada Pfc. Philip Kowice, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico Lt. Jack C. Montgomery, Cherokee, Oklahoma Sgt. Bob Allen, Choctaw, Mississippi Pvt. Blaine Queen, Cherokee, North Carolina Pvt. Eugene Roubideoux, Sioux, South Dakota Pfc. Alonzo Enos, Pima, Arizona Pfc. Albert Wahweotten, Potawatomi, Kansas Sgt. Clifford Etsitty, Navajo, New Mexico Bert G. Eaglehorse, Sioux, South Dakota Pfc. George W. Walker, Cherokee, North Carolina Sgt. Leo Upshaw, Navajo, New Mexico Pfc. Thurman E. Nanomantube, Iowa Choctaw, Kansas Pfc. Norris L. Galvez, Papago, Arizona Pvt. Vincent Hunts Horses Sioux, South Dakota Distinguished Flying Cross Lt. William R. Fredenberg, Menominee, Wisconsin Lt. Richard Balenti, Cheyenne, Haida, Oklahoma S/Sgt. Peter N. Jackson, Hoopa, California S/Sgt. Shuman Show, Pointe, California S/Sgt. Neil McKinnon, Yurok, California (1 cluster) S/Sgt. Alfred Dalpino, Shoshone, Idaho TSgt. Theodore S. Breiner, Sioux, North Dakota S/Sgt. Ernest DuBray, Blackfoot, Montana (3 clusters) Lt. Alfred Houser, Apache, Oklahoma (1 cluster) S/Sgt. Albert Lopez, Delaware, Oklahoma Lt. Edward Tinker, Osage, Oklahoma (2 clusters) S/Sgt. Archie Hawkins, Sioux, South Dakota S/Sgt. Steve Brown, Pointe, Nevada T/Sgt. Harold E, Rogers, Seneca. Oklahoma...

Indian Honors in World War 2

A soldier, who is cited for gallantry in action, when that gallantry does not warrant the award of a Medal of Honor or a Distinguished Service Cross, is given the Silver Star. This decoration was awarded posthumously to Ben Quintana, a Keres, from Cochiti Pueblo. According to the citation, Ben was “an ammunition carrier in a light machine gun squadron charged with protection of the right flank of his troop which was counterattacked by superior numbers.” The gunner was killed and the assistant gunner severely wounded. “Private Quintana,” the citation continues, “refused to retire from this hazardous position and gallantly rushed forward to the silenced gun and delivered a withering fire into the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties. While so engaged he was mortally wounded. By this extraordinary courage he repulsed the counterattack and prevented the envelopment of the right finks of his troop. Private Quintana’s unflinching devotion to duty and heroism under fire inspired his troop to attack and seize the enemy strong point.” With Ben Quintana’s death the country has lost one of its most promising young artists. At the age of 15, he won first prize over 80 contestants, of whom 7 were Indians, for a poster to be used in the Coronado Cuarto Centennial celebration. Later, he won first prize and $1,000 in an American Magazine contest in which there were 52,587 entries. Silver Star to Sherman Graduate Captain Leonard Lowry, a graduate of Sherman Institute, also wears the Silver Star. He was a first lieutenant at the time of the citation, which says: “He was advancing with an Infantry force of 500 men when they...

Honor of Indian Heroism

The war has ended in victory for the United Nations, and after a troubled period of readjustment and reorganization, peace will come at last. The story of the Indians’ contribution to the winning of the war has been told only in part; and new material will be coming in for many months. As one of the Sioux boys says, “As a rule nowadays the fellows don’t go in for heroics.” But already the Indian record is impressive. In the spring of 1945, there were 2 1,767 Indians in the Army, 191 in the Navy, 121 in the Coast Guard, and 723 in the Marines. These figures do not include officers, for whom no statistics are avoidable. Several hundred Indian women are in the various branches of the services. The Standing Rock Agency, North Dakota, estimates that at least fifty girls from that jurisdiction are in uniform. The Office of Indian Affairs has recorded 71 awards of the Air Medal, 51 of the Silver Star, 47 of the Bronze Star Medal, 34 of the Distinguished Flying Cross, and two of the Congressional Medal of Honor. There are undoubtedly many more which have not been reported. Many of these ribbons are decorated with oak leaf clusters awarded in lieu of additional medals. It is not unusual to see an Air Medal with nine oak leaf clusters, or twelve, or even fourteen. The casualty lists are long. They come from theatres of war all over the world. There were many Indians in the prison comps of the Philippines after the fall of Batoan and Corrugators, and later there were many more on...

Bryson, Howard – Obituary

Native Walla Wallan Howard Roscoe Bryson, 76, died July 18, 1989, at the Seattle Veterans Administration Medical Center. The funeral service was held today at Washington Soldiers’ Home Chapel in Orting, Wash., and the memorial service was at Sumner (Wash.) Presbyterian Church. Burial was at Veterans of all Wars Court in Mountain View Cemetery, Tacoma. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sumner Presbyterian Church through hill Funeral Home, 217 E. Pioneer Ave., Puyallup, Wash. 98372. Bryson was born July 21, 1912, in Walla Walla. He was a direct descendant of William I. Price of Orange. Bryson’s ancestors settled at New Amsterdam, N.Y. from the Netherlands and later in Iowa. Some came West in a covered wagon and settled in Cove, Ore. He attended elementary school in Walla Walla. While at Walla Walla High School, he participated in numerous activities and won a tennis championship. He graduated from high school at 15 with an IQ of 150. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in economics in 1933 from Whitman College when he was 19. While at Whitman, he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, French club, the sophomore play staff, was a advertising manager of The Pioneer, in pep band, manager of the operetta “Pirates of Penzance,” and a member of the Drama Club, participating in “Blue Moon.” He taught commercial and business subjects in the Clarkston High School and later at Washtuncna High School. He also managed his father’s sheep ranch for about five years when his father was in ill health. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Bryson enlisted in the U.S. Army in January...

World War 2 Casualties

This collection lists War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

World War 2 Casualties – Navy, Marines, Coast Guard

Inclusion of names in the World War 2 Casualty Lists has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Navy – Marines – Coast Guard Alabama World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Alaska World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Arizona World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Arkansas World War 2 NMCG Casualty List California World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Colorado World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Connecticut World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Delaware World War 2 NMCG Casualty List District of Columbia World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Florida World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Georgia World War 2...

Wyoming World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Wyoming World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Wyoming Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 185 Prison Camp 2 Missing 0 Wounded 175 Released Prisoners 19 Total 381 Wyoming World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...
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