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Biography of Mrs. Jennie Stewart

Taking up her residence in Bartlesville eighteen years ago, Mrs. Jennie Stewart has thoroughly identified her interests with those of the town, in whose progress and development she is deeply and helpfully interested, her influence being at all times on the side of advancement and improvement. She was born in Osborn, Dekalb County, Missouri, her parents being Joseph and Nancy J. (Parrott) Truex, the former a native of Tennessee while the latter was born in Illinois. In Missouri her father engaged in merchandising and he also took a prominent part in public affairs serving as a member of the state senate at the time of his death, in 1883. The mother passed away in 1912. Their family numbered seven children: John W., deceased; Daniel A., who is living in Pasadena, California; E. E., 4 resident of Mosier, Missouri; Della A., who has passed away; Jennie, now Mrs. Stewart; and Thompson J. and Claude A., both of whom are deceased. In the acquirement of an education Miss Truex attended the Stephens College at Columbia, Missouri, specializing in the study of literature, and she left school in 1889 to become the bride of J. B. Hockensmith, by whom she had two sons, James Marshall and Frank Edward. The elder son is assistant cashier of the Union National Bank of Bartlesville and the oldest employe of that institution in point of years of service. The Masonic fraternity finds in him an exemplary representative who endeavors to fulfill in his life its teachings concerning mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. He married Miss Mabel W. Voegele of Dwight, Kansas, a graduate of the Virgil...

Biography of Mrs. Addie Wagon Lowen

Agricultural interests of Washington County find a prominent representative in Mrs. Addie Wagon Lowen, whose farm is situated near Bartlesville and constitutes one of the best improved and most desirable properties in this part of the state. She was born in Indiana, her parents being Richard and Victoria Evans (Pitman) McDaniel, the former a native of North Carolina, while the latter was born in eastern Tennessee. On coming to Indian Territory they settled near Bartlesville, where the father engaged in general farming and stock raising until his demise, which occurred in 1907. The mother is now living on a homestead in southern Oregon. On the 22d of November, 1893, Addie McDaniel was united in marriage to Joseph Wagon, a member of the Delaware tribe, while she is of Cherokee, Scotch and Irish descent. They became the parents of two children: Edgar Joseph, who is deceased ; and Katie, who is a graduate of the local high school and also of the Bartlesville Business College. She has been in the employ of the Chamber of Commerce here, but is now with the Young Women’s Christian Association in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mr. Wagon passed away on the 25th of April, 1899, and in 1901 his widow wedded N. L. Lowen, by whom she has two daughters, Sarah Viola and Mary Leathe, both graduates of the Bartlesville high school, and the latter will attend the University of Kansas in order to prepare herself for the career of a journalist. Mrs. Lowen’s farm comprises one hundred and seventy acres and is situated about four miles south of Bartlesville, in the beautifully wooded foothills of...

Biography of Mary Pearl Smith, D. O.

Mary Pearl Smith, D. O. The theory upon which osteopathy rests is that most diseases and pains are due to some mechanical interference not permitting a free flow of forces and nourishment between the parts of the human anatomy so as to establish normal tissue and harmony of conditions. This adjustment theory had long since passed the experimental stage, and osteopathy is now a widely recognized science. It is a sane factor in lessening the suffering of mankind, and through it, in many thousands of cases, there had been re-established harmony of conditions and action known as health. A capable and enthusiastic exponent of this school of healing is Mary Pearl Smith, D. O., whose professional career had been characterized by truly remarkable results. She had been a resident of Fredonia since January, 1914, and during three years had built up a large and representative practice. Doctor Smith was born at Jefferson, Montgomery County, Kansas, July 27, 1887, and is a daughter of Emery Erwin and Mabel Dean (Simpson) Smith. She traces her lineage to an English family which came to America and settled in New York during the days of the colonies. Her paternal grandfather was Ephraim Lynn Smith, who was born about 1832 in Southern Indiana, where he grew to manhood. Later he became a pioneer farmer near Carlyle, Allen County, Kansas, in 1866, and then near Jefferson, Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1874. He continued farming until he retired, then taking up his residence at Jefferson, and his death occurred in 1910 while on a visit to Hitchcock, South Dakota. He was a republican and a member...

Biography of Mrs. Emma Daniels

Mrs. Emma Daniels, a native daughter of Oklahoma and a member of an old an honored pioneer family of the state, is the owner of a good farm near Ochelata, in Washington county, and the discovery of oil on her property has also added greatly to its value. She is a daughter of Mrs. Jacob Dick, a native of Texas, who was formerly Mrs. William Rogers. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers were Oklahoma pioneers. Mrs. Dick resided in Oklahoma since 1872, and after the demise of Mr. Dick, who was a native of this state and a farmer by occupation, she made her home with the subject of this review until her death on November 1, 1921. In the schools of her native state Emma Dick received her education and on reaching young womanhood she married George Daniels, a Cherokee and a native of Oklahoma, born December 25, 1851. In early life his parents removed from Georgia to Indian Territory, settling among the Spavinaw hills, in the Delaware district. Mr. Daniels devoted his life to farming and was a successful agriculturist. Four children were born of that union: Lucy became the wife of Phyletius Reed, who was a machine gunner in the World war and died in France. He was a member of the Cherokee tribe and after his demise his widow married J. M. Mangan, a well known farmer; George Daniels, twenty-five years of age, is also a veteran of the World war and saw service in France as a corporal of the One Hundred and Ninth Infantry, which was attached to the Twenty-eighth Division. He is a bright...

Biography of Mrs. Ellen Howard Miller

Mrs. Ellen Howard Miller is a woman of broad interests and accomplishments, her greatest pleasures centering around those things that are instructive and up building to herself and the people and conditions around her. To her the realm of civics is one of unlimited interest, in which she loves to spend her time when business, home and Church interests will allow, and in this field many enterprises and activities of economic value owe their birth and fostering to her inspiration and initiative. One of the earliest of these enterprises was the forming of an organization of the women of Vinita, her old home town, for the purpose of having the cemetery surveyed, fenced and improved. While still in Vinita she had charge of the Demorest contest work among the young people and was also sent as representative from Indian Territory to the World’s convention of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union held at Chicago during the World’s Columbian Exposition. When the World’s Dry Farming Congress met in Tulsa in 1914, she was appointed delegate both by Bartlesville and Washington County and at this congress her farm on the Caney River was awarded one of the prizes. At this time she was also elected Oklahoma’s first Vice President for the Woman’s Dry Farming Congress for the following year. In club work, too, she has taken an active part, especially in matters relating to civic activities, which have always received her interest and support, and she was one of the first to see the possibilities and work for the promotion and development of Johnstone Park, in Bartlesville, one of the most beautiful...

Biography of Miss Neva M. Scott

The self-supporting woman of today wants to work for and deserve whatever success may come to her. These women are not asking for favors. All they want is fair competition. Formerly all that the self-supporting woman could hope for was to make a living, but since the World war the forward march of working women has taken on new life and women are everywhere measuring up to new standards. It is not enough that they take care of their own needs. In addition to this they must contribute something for the betterment of the world and in doing so they become bigger women and are better qualified to do bigger work at their desks. Among the successful self-supporting women of Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is numbered Miss Neva M. Scott. She was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, her parents being John T. and Olive (Myers) Scott, the former a native of New Jersey, while the mother’s birth occurred in Pennsylvania. The father was an oil producer of Illinois, from which state he removed with his wife and family to Oklahoma in 1910, and settled at Bartlesville. He and his family now live in a fine brick home, which is situated on Osage and Seventh streets, Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Neva M. Scott acquired her early education in the public schools of Toledo, Ohio, passing through consecutive grades to the high school, after which she took up the profession of teaching in Marion, Indiana. She later became a pupil in the State Normal College at Terre Haute, Indiana and the Marion Normal College of Marion, Indiana. She lacked but a few weeks of...

Biography of F. S. Cravens, Mrs.

Mrs. F. S. Cravens is the proprietor of the Cravens School of Music at Emporia, and for a number of years had been one of the leaders in musical circles of that city. She is a native of Kansas and one of the notable women whom this Sunflower commonwealth had produced. The daughter of a pioneer citizen of Manhattan, where she was born in February, 1866, she exhibited unusual musical talents when a girl, and by careful training and study both in America and abroad had long enjoyed a high position both as an individual artist and as a successful teacher. Her maiden name is Etta Dent. After attending the public schools of Manhattan she went back to the old home of her family at Galesburg, Illinois, was a student in the high school there and also spent one year in the Musical Conservatory of Knox College. She was married at Manhattan to S. F. Cravens, who was born in Kearney, Missouri, and died at Phoenix, Arizona, in 1906. He was a musical director and teacher. Mr. and Mrs. Cravens taught music in Kansas City, Missouri, later established the Cravens School of Music at Topeka, and from there went to Denver, Colorado, where they were directors of music in the Denver University. Subsequently they were again in Kansas as directors of the Conservatory of Music of Ottawa University, and from there removed to Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. Cravens, on account of ill health, was no longer able to keep up the active work of his profession, and Mrs. Cravens assumed all the burden of teaching while there. After the death...

Biography of Edna L. Johnson, Miss

Miss Edna L. Johnson. In no other field have woman’s work and influence proved such ennobling factors as in the sphere of education. The instruction and the character training of the children of Kansas are largely in the hands of devoted women, and many of the most responsible posts in the school system of the state are filled by woman teachers. The entire school system of Cowley County is under the supervision of Miss Edna L. Johnson, county superintendent of schools, and the people of the county recognize her unqualified fitness for the duties of the office. Miss Johnson was first elected county superintendent in the fall of 1914 and was re-elected in 1916, so that she is now in her second term. She first took office May 10, 1915. Under her supervision are 137 schools, 166 teachers, and an enrollment of 3,350 scholars. Her office as county superintendent is in the courthouse at Winfield. Miss Johnson had spent much of her life in Kansas, but was born near Danville, Illinois, daughter of Josiah Johnson and Emma (Mosier) Johnson, both of whom were born near Danville. In the Johnson lineage there is an admixture of Polish stock, and a number of generations back the family was connected with Count Sandusky’s relationship. The Johnsons were early settlers in this country and were pioneers in Kentucky. Josiah Johnson was born in 1847, was a farmer, and coming to Kansas in 1884 located at Maple City in Cowley County. Later he retired from the farm and spent his last years in Arkansas City, where he died in 1907. He was a republican...

Biography of Miss Isa Allene Greene

Miss Isa Allene Greene grew up in Bourbon County, Kansas, and in that section taught her first school. Through her work she had become one of Kansas’ noted educators. She had proved herself a real teacher. She possesses the ability, rare as it is in any time or generation and rare even in these modern times when so much emphasis is placed upon it, of vitalizing and inspiring the intellectual activities of those under her charge, and all her work had been characterized by a depth of sympathy and understanding which is more necessary in any rational scheme of education than mere ability to impart knowledge. Miss Greene had taught for many years in Kansas and was recently promoted to the great responsibility of superintendent of the School for the Blind, Kansas City, Kansas. Miss Greene was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, at the Town of Smithfield December 29, 1866. She was next to the youngest in a family of ten children. Her parents, Harvey and Nancy (Jaco) Greene, were both natives of Pennsylvania. Her maternal grandfather was of English descent, while her paternal ancestors were Welsh and German. The grandparents came to America about 1800. James H. Greene was a cooper by trade, and also a local minister of the Methodist Church. He and his wife were married and lived continuously in one house in Pennsylvania until all their ten children were born. These children comprised three sons and seven daughters. Five of the daughters taught school at some time, and those living at the present are five daughters and one son: Mrs. Elizabeth Shelley of Independence, Kansas;...

Biography of Mrs. Anna Parks

Mrs. Anna Parks, a native daughter of Oklahoma and a member of one of the old and prominent families of the state, is the owner of a valuable farm near Bartlesville and is a most capable business woman, displaying marked executive ability, foresight and enterprise in the management of her interests. She was born on the present site of Bartlesville, her parents being John and Jennie (Downing) Lovelady, the former a native of Germany, while the latter was born in Indian Territory and was of Cherokee extraction. In 1860 the maternal grandfather, Jesse Thompson, settled near the present location of Bartlesville, becoming the owner of a large tract of land which he developed and improved. He was one of the most prominent men of his day, serving on the Cherokee council at the time the government transferred the Osage from Kansas to Indian Territory, and he also assisted in making the treaty for the land for both the Osage’ and Delaware tribes. John Lovelady came to the United States as a youth and resided for a time in New York. In 1893 he made his way to Indian Territory, where he acquired land, becoming one of the well known settlers of the region. Mr. and Mrs. Lovelady reared three daughters: Susie and Mary, who were Anna’s half sisters, and are both deceased; and Anna, now Mrs. Parks. The last named acquired her education in the schools of Kansas and at Pawhuska, Oklahoma, and in young womanhood was united in marriage to Charles Parks, who is now residing in the state of Idaho for the benefit of his health. Three...
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