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Will Of Lionell Chute

The will of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, dated 4: 7 mo: 1644, was proved in court at Ipswich 7: 9 mo: 1645. The original instrument has not been found, and the following copy is from the record in Ipswich deeds, book i, leaf 15. The fourth day of the eleventh month Anno Dm 1644 I Lionell Chute of the Towne of Ipfwch in New England Schoolmafter doe make & ordayne this my laft will & Teftament (revoking all form wills by me made.) Item I give vntd Rofe my wife for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling howfe with the Barne &all the edifices: (the two chambers over the howfe & entry only excepted which I will that James my fonne fhall have to his only vfe for the Terme of one yeare next after my deceafe with free ingreffe, egreffe, & regreffe & wth the yards, gardens, the home-lott & planting lott purchaffed of Mr. Bartlemew with the Comonage and appurtenances therevnto belonging. And after my wives deceafe; I give the faid howfe, barne, lotts & premiffes with all thappurtenances vnto James Chute my fonne & to his heires. Item I give vnto my faid fonne James Chute & to his heires for ever all & fingular my other lands, lotts, meadow grounds marifhes, with all & finguler their appurtnances & pfitts whatfoever ymdiatly after my deceafe. And I giue more vnto James Chute my fonne (over & above all things before given him) my heffer that is now at goodman white’s farme, & my yonge steere. Item I give him all my books, with...

Will of Richard Woodman

The nuncupative will of Richard Woodman of Lynn was sworn to in Salem quarterly court 30: 10: 1647. The following is a copy of the original on file in the office of the clerk of courts at Salem, volume I, leaf 89. The will of Richard Woodman of the Towne of Lynn defeced [deceased] as foloweth [follows] Being fpoken [spoken] to by Nicholas (Potter) to make his will Paid that he would make his will and being asked by John Gillow too whome [whom] he would giue [give] his goods faid [said] that he would giue [give] fower [four] pounds to the Elders of lynn fortie [forty] fhilings [shillings] a yeere [year], and all the reft [rest] of his goods he would giue [give] to Jofeph Redknap Richard more and (to) his mafter [master] John Gillow, equally to either of them alike and yet Jofeph Redknap he did make his executor. [execator] Witneffes [Witness] to this will John Gillow & Richard Moore witness that Jofeph Redknap is the executor John Gillow Source: The Essex Antiquarian May...

Will of John Lowell

The following is a copy of the will of John Lowell of Newbury transcribed from the ancient copy on file in the probate office in Boston. It was proved 27: 8: 1647. The Laft [last] will & Teftament [Testament] of John Lowle Late of Newberry deceafed [deceased] made this nine & twentieth of the fowrth [forth] mounth 1647. That I John Lowle of Newberry beeing in Pfect [perfect] vnderstanding [understanding] knowing my ffrailty [frailty] doe [do] declare this to bee [be] my last will & Tefament [testament]; ftedfaftly [faithfully] beleiveing that when I goe [go] hence I shall reft [rest] in Glory through my Savior the Lord Jesus Cht [Christ]. As for the Eftate [faith] the Lord hath given me heare [here] I thus difpofe of it : I give unto my wife Elizabeth Lowle one halfe [half] of my estate whether it Consifts [comes] in Goods within or without Land Howses [houses] Cattell [cattle] Household stuffe [stuff] meddowes [meadows] land brocken [broken] or vnbrokne [unbroken] or what elfe [else] Alfoe my said wife to Chufe Twenty pownds [pounds] out of the refidewe of that eftate [estate] which Came by her mother fformerly [formerly] or latter, The reft [rest] of my eftate [estate] to be devided [divided] equally betweene [between] my Sonn [sons] John Lowle, Mary Lowle, Peter Lowle, James Lowle, Joseph Lowle, Beniamine Lowle, & Elizabeth Lowle. Alfo I doe Humbly intreate thefe flue my Chriftian deare Loving ffreinds & bretherne my brother William Gerrish, Richard Lowle, John Sanders, Richard Knight & Nicholas Noice to be my exec and Adm of this my last will & testament [testament]...

Will Of Robert Hunter

The will of Robert Hunter, dated 5: 6mo: 1647, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following copy is taken from the record contained in the Ipswich Deeds, volume 1, leaf 25, the original being missing. This 5th of the 6th month 1647. I Robert Hunter weak of body but of pfect memory prayfed be god doe make & ordayne this to be my laft will & Teftament. firft all my debts being paid I leave my howfe & lott to my wife Mary Hunter for Terme of her life. Item all my goods within the howfe I give to my wife Item I give unto Thomas Birkby one little Browne Heffer that corns two yeares and my fhop geare Item I give unto fome poore in the Church of Rowley ten pounds to be paid out of two mares of which ten pounds ten shillings I give to Richard Clarke Ite ten shillings to John Dresfer Item to John Burbant 108. Item to William Jackson 106. Item to Jane Grant I give 108. Item to Sifly wood 108. Item 301 to Margaret Crosfe 108. Item I give to William Stickne 208. & all my workiday clothes Item to Thomas Elethorp 108. Item I give to mris Shove 408 which I desire may be for helping her sonne when he is to ||goe|| [to] Cambridg. Item I give to John Trumbell 208. Item to Edward Sawier 108. Ite to Thomas Tenny I give 108 and the remainyng 208 of the 101 I give mris. Shove Item as for all the reft of my goods & Chattells...

Will Of Richard Bartlett

The nuncupative will of Richard Bartlett, sr., of Newbury, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following is a copy of the same as recorded in the Ipswich Deeds, volume I, leaf 25. The testimony of William Titcombe & Anthony Somersby concerning the last will & testament of Richard Bartlett fen of Newbury deceased the 20th of May 1647. About a month before he deceased we being with him & two of his sonnes being prfent he being very ill & had been weak all the spring finding in himself that he was not like to continue he desired us to take notice what his mind was concerning that small estate he had how he would dispose of it. As for his son John Bartlett he had done for him more then for the rest of his children & at that time did not dispose any to him. To his sonne Christofer Bartlett he did bequeath the debt which lately he had borrowed of him which was five bushels of wheat if foe be it should please the lord to take him away at this sickness or else if he should lye long visited his necessity would require that he should pay it again. To his daughter Johan wife of William Titcomb he bequeathed one pair of new shoes for herself & her four daughters each one a pair of shoes And all the rest of his goods & chattells that were not disposed of he bequeathed wholly to his son Richard Bartlett whom he made his sole heir & executor. I Anthony Somersby the next...

Genealogy of John Peter Stoneburner

John Peter Stoneburner, fifth child of Johann Peter and Susanna Stoneburner, was born in Virginia before his parents moved to Morgan Co., Ohio. It was probably in Ohio that he married Catherine sometime around 1810. On the 12th of October 1879-john Stoneburner wrote his will. It read: “In the name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, John Stoneburner of the State of Ohio and of the County of Morgan, do make and publish this my Last will and testament Item 1st–I wish my Beloved Wife to remain on the Farm and in the House where we now reside and to have the third of the produce of the whole farm-and one Horse, and one Cow, and all the household and kitchen furniture. During her natural life. Item 2nd–whereas I have paid unto Jonathon and Robert my two sons one hundred and fifty dollars each-and sixty five dollars to Susanna Collins one of my daughters; now it is my will and wish that Sampson my sone shall have fifty acres off of the south side of the Farm before mentioned, in lue of his full share of the real estate for which I this day make him a deed; and he is to pay the thirds of the produce of the same, to me and my wife during our natural lives 3rd–I also wish Margaret, Catherine, and George and Henry my sons and daughters to have one hundred and fifty dollars each–so as to make them equal to the former named sones– 4th–I also wish my daughter Susanna to have eighty five dollars, which she is not to receive...

Genealogy of Samuel Austin

Samuel, only surviving son of Henry and Elizabeth Lyles Austin, continued living in Calvert County, Maryland. By 1730, Samuel was married to Elizabeth Marshall, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Marshall. They had eleven surviving children when Samuel’s will was written in 1763. Some of their children moved to Virginia, specifically Albemarle County. Samuel Austin’s will of 1763 read: “In the name of God amen. I Samuel Austin of Calvert County in the province of Maryland, planter being in good health of body and of sound anal perfect mind and memory, I do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I desire that my debts may be paid and discharged at the discretion of my executor hereafter named and as touching the temporal estate that it hath been pleased God to bestow upon me I do give and bequeath in manner and form following. First I do give and bequeath unto my son William Austin that part of my land to the westward of the church rode and his heirs forever and one negro boy named George and one negro woman named Sarah. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son James Austin and his heirs forever all my land to the eastward of the church rode and one negro boy named Abraham. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son Henry Austin one negro woman Priss. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Austin one negro boy named Dick. Next I do give and bequeath unto my daughter Margaret Austin one negro girl named Rachel. Next...

Genealogy of Henry Austin

Austin as a surname is a variation of Augustine or Augustus. The Austin line enters the Spracklin line with the marriage of George E. Spracklin to Grace Belle Austin on 29 March 1903. There have been several Austin coats of arms granted as early as 1660 but many of the lines have died out. This particular Austin line came early to Calvert Co., Maryland. They were planters, that is, owners of plantations and more than likely raised tobacco on the land there. To help them with their plantations, they owned slaves as evidenced by wills. And it is quite possible, that the early Austin’s had close associations with the Quakers of early Maryland. According to the wills, the Austin men remembered their God who blessed them with all that they had. Many of the heraldic symbols in Austin’s’ arms were crosses. The motto: “Trust in God and He will give strength” seems quite appropriate. It is quite probable that the Austin family came from England to New England sometime around 1665. Likewise the Harrisons, Lyles and quite possibly the Marshalls all came to Maryland around the same time. Samuel and Henry Austin, sons of Thomas Austin, came to Calvert Co., Md. Henry Austin was born before 1687 and died in Calvert Co., Md. He had married twice: first, to Elizabeth Lyles, widow of Robert Lyles who had died around 1705. From that marriage he had a son Samuel who was born around 1710. By 1729 Henry married the second time to Jane Harvey, widow. Henry’s will of 1745 reads: “In the name of God amen. I Henry Austin of...

Walter Woodworth

Walter Woodworth came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. Was assigned the third lot on Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of the present Greenbush or South Scituate R. R. Station, which was in early times called Walter Woodworth’s Hill, and in 1666 he became a purchaser of sixty acres at Weymouth. In 1640 Walter was assessed nine shillings for the public use, and March 2, 1641, freeman; and in June 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of highways in Scituate, and again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate as juror, etc. In 2654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles Chancy as their minister. Origin of Woodward Name This ancient name of Woodward is derived from the forest keepers, the Woodwards of the Hundred Rolls in the reign of Edward 1st. The Arms used by the Woodward Family of Kent, England Richard Woodward of Woodmarsh and his son William Woodward of Ashford, Kent Co., used the old arms and crest of the family in England. ARMS: ar. a chew. Sa. betw. three grasshoppers Vert. CREST: A demi Woodman couped at the knees. Vested gu, hair dishevelled or in his dexter hand a honeysuckle of the ppr., stalked and leaved Vert. Descendants...

Mark Haskell Fourth Generation

MARK4 (Mark,3 Marks2 Mark1), baptized March 16, 1729; d. Aug. 29, 1811; lived at the ferry. He first learned the earthern-ware business at Danvers ; but through dislike of his occupation he removed back to Marblehead, and assumed that of a shoreman. Aug. 29, 17555, he sold to Susannah, widow of Mark Haskell, his father, a house and land, bounded S. W. on the street by the new meeting-house (now Unitarian), 28 feet S. on Strikers land, E. 011 Batchelder’s land, Mark to a stake &c., leaving 22 feet on land of said 13 inches from the south corner of “my house.” Aug. 25, 1755, he bought of the above-said Susannah Haskell, who was administuatrix of the estate of Philip Hubbard, “the late mansion house and land formerly belonging to said Hubbard, bounded S. on the street [Mugford Street] opposite the new meeting-house, N. W. on Phillips, E. on Batchelder, and S. E. on Striker.” Sept. 2,1765, he bought of Mary White, widow (probably of Thomas) one acre of land at the ferry “near Noggs head,” and bounded on the sea. Sept. 8, 1173, he sold to Capt. Jona. Glover, of Marblehead, merchant, one half right of a lien in middle division No. 22, and formerly in possession of Sarah Merritt. Dec. 16, 1179, he sold to William Bean a house near the new meeting-house, formerly the property of George Wilson, bounded on William Hayden, Bartlett, and the road. Feb. 18, 1785, he bought of Nicholas Coombs, executor to the will of Michael Coombs, his father, “a cow’s commonage in the upper division, in the great field.” Also a...
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