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The French and Indian War from 1754 to 1759 – Beaver Wars

After the peace, concluded between France and England in 1748, the French, excluded from the Atlantic coast of North America, designed to take possession of the country further west, and for this purpose, commenced to build a chain of forts to connect the St. Lawrence and the Mississippi rivers. The English, to prevent this scheme from being carried into action, formed an Ohio company, to whom a considerable extent of country was granted by the English government. Upon hearing of this, the governor of Canada notified the governors of New York and Pennsylvania, that if the English traders came upon the western territory, they would be seized or killed. This menace did not divert the Ohio company from prosecuting its design of surveying the country as far as the falls in the Ohio river. While Mr. Gist was making that survey for the company, some French parties, with their Indians, seized three British traders, and carried them to Presque Isle, on Lake Erie, where a strong fort was then erecting. The British, alarmed at this capture, retired to the Indian towns for shelter; and the Twightwees, resenting the violence done to their allies, assembled, to the number of five hundred or six hundred, scoured the woods, and, finding three French traders, sent them to Pennsylvania. The French determined to persist; built a strong fort, about fifteen miles south of the former, on one of the branches of the Ohio; and another still, at the confluence of the Ohio and Wabache; and thus completed their long projected communication between the mouth of the Mississippi and the river St. Lawrence. Thus...

1759, December 12, Fort Loudoun

Sir I have Received a Letter from Lieut. Coytmore of the 6th Instant by John Arcy, by which he acquaints Me, that your Excellency’s Orders were: that Old Hop shou’d b informed that the Little Carpenter, of any other Head Man, shou’d be appointed, to come down to Keowee with Power to settle matters, as shou’d be found requisat to make things Straight, as He himself was present. Accordingly I sent for him to come to the Fort, and that I had a Letter to communicate to him; but the Old Fellow sent me severall excuses, saying that it was cold Weather, and that he had the care of a littlechild, therefore he cou’d not come. As it hapned then that the Warrior of Tennesee, and the Great Warrior’s Mephew were at my House, I acquainted them, with what Old Hop had said; and farther told them, that as the Old Fellow by his severall talks, had made the Path bloody, it was not My businefs to go to him, but for him to come to the fort to me, to hear what your Excelleny required: and that his excuse at this present time, look’d very foolish, by saying that he was to look after a Child, when the Governor of South Carolina, hath left his Province, and was come as far as Keowee, with all the Head Men of the Cherokee Nation; to endeavour to make everything Straight. Therefore I desired him, without any Delay, to acquaint Some Body to act for him. The Warrior of Tennesee promised me that he wou’d tell him, what I told him:...

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