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Tigua Tribe

Tigua Indians (Spanish form of Ti’wan, pl Tiwesh’ (span. Tiguex), their own name). A group of Pueblo tribes comprising three geographic divisions, one occupying Taos and Picuris (the most northerly of the New Mexican pueblos) on the upper waters of the Rio Grande; another inhabiting Sandia and Isleta, north and south of Albuquerque, respectively; the third division, living in the pueblos of Isleta del Sur, Texas, and Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua, on the lower Rio Grande. At the time of Coronado’s visit to New Mexico in 1540-42 the Tigua inhabited Taos and Picuris in the north, and, as today, were separated from the middle group by the Tano, the Tewa, and the Rio Grande Queres (Keresan). The villages of this middle group in the 16th century extended from a short distance above Bernalillo to the neighborhood of Los Lunas and over an area east of the Rio Grande near the salt lagoons of the Manzano, in a territory known as the Salinas, from Chilili to Quarai. The pueblos in the south, near El Paso, were not established until late in the 17th century. Tigua Indians History The Tigua were first made known to history through Coronado’s expedition in 1540, whose chroniclers describe their territory, the province of Tiguex, on the Rio Grande, as containing 12 pueblos on both sides of the river, and the people as possessing corn, beans, melons, skins, and long robes of feathers and cotton. The Spaniards were received by them with friendliness, but when it was decided to spend the winter of 1540-41 in Tiguex province, and the Spaniards demanded of the natives “about 300...

Pueblo Family

Pueblo Indians, Pueblo Family – (towns, villages , so called on account of the peculiar style of compact permanent settlements of these people, as distinguished from temporary camps or scattered rancherias of less sub stantial houses). A term applied by the Spaniards and adopted by English-speaking people to designate all the Indians who lived or are living in permanent stone or adobe houses built into compact villages in south Colorado and central Utah, and in New Mexico, Arizona, and the adjacent Mexican territory, and extended sometimes to include the settlements of such tribes as the Pima and the Papago, who led an agricultural life. The Pueblo people of history comprise the Tanoan, Keresan (Queres), and Zunian linguistic families of New Mexico, and the Hopi, of Shoshonean affinity, in north east Arizona. These are distributed as follows, the tribes or villages noted being only those now existent or that recently have become extinct: Linguistic Stock Group Tribes or Villages Tanoan Tewa Tigua Jemez Tano Piro Nambe, Tesuque, San Ildefonso, Jan Juan, Santa Clara, Pojoaque (recently extinct) Hano Isleta, Sandia, Taos, Picuris, Isleta del Sur (Mexicanized) Jemez, Pecos (extinct) Practically extinct. Senecu, Socorro del Sur, (both Mexicanized) Keresan (Queres) Eastern Western San Felipe, Santa Ana, Sia, Cochiti, San Domingo Acoma, Laguna, and outlying villages Zuñian Zuñi Zuñi and its outlying villages Shoshonean Hopi Walpi, sichomovi, Mishongnovi, Sipaulovi, Shongopovi, Oraibi Pueblo Indians Habitat The Pueblo tribes of the historical period have been confined to the area extending from northeast Arizona to the Rio Pecos in New Mexico (and, intrusively, into west Kansas), and from Taos on the Rio Grande, New Mexico, in...

Tigua Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Iebathu. The White-corn clan of the Tigua pueblo of Isleta, N. Mex. Iechur. The Yellow-corn clan of the Tigua pueblo of Isleta, N. Mex. Iefeu. The Red-corn clan of the Tigua pueblo of Isleta, N....

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