Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Tewa Tribe

Tewa (‘moccasins,’ their Keresan name). A group of Pueblo tribes belonging to the Tanoan linguistic family, now (1905) occupying the villages of San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Clara, Nambe, Tesuque, and Hano, all except the last lying in the valley of the Rio Grande in north New Mexico. The pueblo of Hano, in the Hopi country of north east Arizona, dates from the time of the Pueblo revolt of 1680-92. Pojoaque was inhabited by Tewa until a few years ago, when intermarriage with Mexicans and the death of the few full-bloods made it practically a Mexican settlement. It had been supposed that the Tano, an offshoot of the Tewa in prehistoric times, spoke a dialect distinct from that of the Tewa, but recent studies by John P. Harrington show that the differences are so slight as to be negligible. In 1598 Juan de Ciliate named 11 of the Tewa pueblos and stated that there were others; 30 years later Fray Alonzo Benavides reported the population to be 6,000 in 8 pueblos. The population of the present 6 villages is about 1,200, San Juan, the largest, having 419, and Tesuque, the smallest, 86 inhabitants. Each village of the Tewa is divided into two sections, the Winter people and the Summer people. According to Bandelier, “the dignity of chief penitent or cacique belongs alternately to each of these two groups. Thus the Summer cacique serves from the vernal equinox to the autumnal, and the Winter cacique from the autumnal to the vernal equinox. On very important occasions, however, the Oyiké or Winter cacique is inferior to his colleague.” Little is yet...

Pueblo Family

Pueblo Indians, Pueblo Family – (towns, villages , so called on account of the peculiar style of compact permanent settlements of these people, as distinguished from temporary camps or scattered rancherias of less sub stantial houses). A term applied by the Spaniards and adopted by English-speaking people to designate all the Indians who lived or are living in permanent stone or adobe houses built into compact villages in south Colorado and central Utah, and in New Mexico, Arizona, and the adjacent Mexican territory, and extended sometimes to include the settlements of such tribes as the Pima and the Papago, who led an agricultural life. The Pueblo people of history comprise the Tanoan, Keresan (Queres), and Zunian linguistic families of New Mexico, and the Hopi, of Shoshonean affinity, in north east Arizona. These are distributed as follows, the tribes or villages noted being only those now existent or that recently have become extinct: Linguistic Stock Group Tribes or Villages Tanoan Tewa Tigua Jemez Tano Piro Nambe, Tesuque, San Ildefonso, Jan Juan, Santa Clara, Pojoaque (recently extinct) Hano Isleta, Sandia, Taos, Picuris, Isleta del Sur (Mexicanized) Jemez, Pecos (extinct) Practically extinct. Senecu, Socorro del Sur, (both Mexicanized) Keresan (Queres) Eastern Western San Felipe, Santa Ana, Sia, Cochiti, San Domingo Acoma, Laguna, and outlying villages Zuñian Zuñi Zuñi and its outlying villages Shoshonean Hopi Walpi, sichomovi, Mishongnovi, Sipaulovi, Shongopovi, Oraibi Pueblo Indians Habitat The Pueblo tribes of the historical period have been confined to the area extending from northeast Arizona to the Rio Pecos in New Mexico (and, intrusively, into west Kansas), and from Taos on the Rio Grande, New Mexico, in...

Tewa Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. De. The Coyote clans of the Tewa pueblos of San Juan, Tesuque, and San Ildefonso, N. Mex. Those of Tesuque and San Ildefonso are extinct. Dye (D’ye). The Gopher clans of the Tewa pueblos of San Juan, Santa Clara, San Ildefonso, and Tesuque, N....

Pin It on Pinterest