Palouse Indians

Palouse Indians were located in the valley of Palouse River in Washington and Idaho and on a small section of Snake River, extending eastward to the camas grounds near Moscow, Idaho. The Palouse were included in the Yakima treaty of 1855 but have never recognized the treaty obligations and have declined to lead a reservation life.



Klickitat Indians

Klickitat Indians. The original home of the Klickitat was somewhere south of the Columbia, and they invaded their later territory after the Yakima crossed the river. They joined in the Yakima treaty at Camp Stevens, June 9, 1855, by which they ceded their lands to the United States, and most of them settled upon the Yakima Reservation.



Paloos Tribe

Paloos (Pä-lus;) A Shahaptian tribe formerly occupying the valley of Palouse river in Washington and Idaho, and the north bank of Snake river as far as its junction with the Columbia.  They were found by Lewis and Clark in 1805 on the Clearwater in Idaho.  Their closest connection was with the kindred Nez Percé and



Ithkyemamits Tribe

Ithkyemamits Indians. A tribe or band of doubtful linguistic affinity, either Chinookan or Shahaptian, living in 1812 on Columbia River in Klickitat County, Washington, nearly opposite The Dalles. Their number was estimated at 600.



Wallawalla Tribe

Wallawalla Indians (‘little river’). A Shahaptian tribe formerly living on lower Walla Walla river and along the east bank of the Columbia from Snake river nearly to the Umatilla in Washington and Oregon. While a distinct dialect, their language is closely related to the Nez Percé. Their number was estimated by Lewis and Clark as



Umatilla Tribe

Umatilla Indians. A Shahaptian tribe formerly lining on Umatilla Reservation and the adjacent banks of the Columbia in Oregon.  They were included under the Walla Walla by Lewis and Clark in 1805, though their language is distinct. In 1855 they joined in a treaty with the United States and settled on the Umatilla Reservation in



Tyigh Tribe

Tyigh Indians. A Shahaptian tribe speaking the Tenino language and formerly occupying the country about Tygh and White rivers in Wasco County, Oregon.  They took part in the Wasco treaty of 1855 and are now on the Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon.  Their number is not reported, as they are classed under the indiscriminate term “Warm



Tenino Tribe

Tenino Indians. A Shahaptian tribe formerly occupying the valley of Des Chutes River, Oregon.  The Tenino dialect was spoken on both sides of the Columbia from The Dalles to the mouth of the Umatilla.  In 1855 they joined in the Wasco treaty and were placed on Warm Springs Reservation, since which time they have usually



Yakima Tribe

Yakima Indians, Yakima Nation (Ya-ki-ná, `runaway’). An important Shahaptian tribe, formerly living on both sides of the Columbia and on the northerly branches of the Yakima (formerly Tapteal) and the Wenatchee, in Washington. They are mentioned by Lewis and Clark in 1806 under the name Cutsahnim (possibly the name of a chief): and estimated as 1,200



Nez Percé Indians

Nez Percé Indians. A French appellation signifying “pierced noses.” Also called: Â’dal-k’ato’igo, Kiowa name, signifying “people with hair cut across the forehead.” Anípörspi, Calapooya name. A-pa-o-pa, Atsina name (Long, 1823). A-pū-pe’, Crow name, signifying “to paddle,” “paddles.” Blue Muds, name applied by traders. Chopunnish, Lewis and Clark. Green Wood Indians, Henry-Thompson Journal. I’-na-cpĕ, Quapaw name.



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