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Treaty of August 8, 1831

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at Wapaghkonnetta, in the county of Allen and State of Ohio on the 8th day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, by and between James B. Gardiner specially appointed commissioner on the part of the United States and John McElvain, Indian Agent for the Wyandots, Senecas and Shawnees residing in the State of Ohio, on the one part, and the undersigned, principal Chiefs, Headmen and Warriors of the tribe of Shawnee Indians residing at Wapaghkonnetta and Hog Creek, within the territorial limits of the organized county of Allen, in the State of Ohio. Whereas the President of the United States under the authority of the Act of Congress, approved May 28, 1830, has appointed a special commissioner to confer with the different Indian tribes residing within the constitutional limits of the State of Ohio, and to offer for their acceptance the provisions of the before recited act:-And whereas the tribe or band of Shawnee Indians residing at Wapaghkonnetta and on Hog Creek in the said State, have expressed their perfect assent to the conditions of the said act, and their willingness and anxiety to remove west of the Mississippi river, in order to obtain a more permanent and advantageous home for themselves and their posterity. Therefore, in order to carry into effect the aforesaid objects, the following articles of Convention have been agreed upon by the aforesaid contracting parties, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be mutually...

Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians. Article 2. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties on the other, shall be...

Agreement of September 3, 1823

At a treaty held under the authority of the United States at Moscow, in the county of Livingston, in the State of New York, between the sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Seneka nation of Indians in behalf of said nation, and John Greig and Henery B. Gibson of Canandaigua in the county of Ontario; in the presence of Charles Carroll, esquire, commissioner appointed by the United States for holding said treaty, and of Nathaniel Gorham, esquire, superintendent, in behalf of the State of Massachusetts. Know all men by these presents, that the said sachems, chiefs, and warriors, for and in consideration of the sum of four thousand two hundred and eighty-six dollars, lawful money of the United States, to them in hand paid by the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, at or immediately before the ensealing and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, bargained, sold, aliened, released, quit claimed and confirmed unto the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, alien, release, quit claim, and confirm, unto the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, their heirs and assigns, forever, all that tract, piece or parcel of land commonly called and known by the name of the Gordeau reservation, situate, lying and being in the counties of Livingston and Genesee, in the State of New York, bounded as follows, that is to say: Beginning at the mouth of Steep Hill creek, thence due east, until it strikes the Old Path, thence south until a due west line will intersect with certain steep...

Treaty of January 9, 1789 – Six Nations

Articles of a treaty made at Fort Harmar, the ninth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, between Arthur St. Clair, esquire, governor of the territory of the United States of America, north-west of the river Ohio, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the said United States, for removing all causes of controversy, regulating trade, and settling boundaries, between the Indian nations in the northern department and the said United States, of the one part, and the sachems and warriors of the Six Nations, of the other part: Article 1. Whereas the United States, in congress assembled, did, by their commissioners, Oliver Wolcott, Richard Butler, and Arthur Lee, esquires, duly appointed for that purpose, at a treaty held with the said Six Nations, viz: with the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Tuscarora, Cayuga, and Seneka, at Fort Stanwix, on the twenty-second day of October, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four, give peace to the said nations, and receive them into their friendship and protection: And whereas the said nations have now agreed to and with the said Arthur St. Clair, to renew and confirm all the engagements and stipulations entered into at the before mentioned treaty at Fort Stanwix: and whereas it was then and there agreed, between the United States of America and the said Six Nations, that a boundary line should be fixed between the lands of the said Six Nations and the territory of the said United States, which boundary line is as follows, viz: Beginning at the mouth of a creek, about four miles east of Niagara, called Ononwayea, or Johnston’s...

Second Treaty of June 30, 1802

At a treaty held under the authority of the United States, at Buffalo Creek in the county of Ontario, and state of New York, between the Sachems, Chiefs and Warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians, on behalf of said nation, and Oliver Phelps, Esq. of the county of Ontario, Isaac Bronson, Esq. of the city of New York, and Horatio Jones, of the said county of Ontario, in the presence of John Tayler, Esq. Commissioner appointed by the President of the United States for holding said treaty. Know all men by these presents, that the said Sachems, Chiefs and Warriors, for and in consideration of the sum of twelve hundred dollars, lawful money of the United States, unto them in hand paid by the said Oliver Phelps, Isaac Bronson and Horatio Jones, at or immediately before the sealing and delivery hereof, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, HAVE and by these presents DO grant, remise, release and forever quit claim and confirm unto the said Oliver Phelps, Isaac Bronson and Horatio Jones, and to their heirs and assigns, ALL that tract of land commonly called and known by the name of Little Beard’s Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Ontario, bounded on the East by the Genesee river and Little Beard’s Creek, on the south and west by other lands of the said parties of the second part, and on the north by Big Tree Reservation—containing two square miles, or twelve hundred and eighty acres, together with all and singular, the hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging, or in any wise appertaining, to hold...

Treaty of June 30, 1802

This Indenture, made the thirtieth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two, between the Sachems, Chiefs, and Warriors of the Seneca nation of Indians, of the first part, and Wilhem Willink, Pieter Van Eeghen, Hendrik Vollenhoven, W. Willink the younger, 1. Willink the younger (son of Jan) Jan Gabriel Van Staphorst, Roelof Van Staphorst, the younger, Cornelis Vollenhoven, and Hendrik Seye, all of the city of Amsterdam, and republic of Batavia, by Joseph Ellicott, esquire, their agent and attorney, of the second part. Whereas at a treaty held under the authority of the United States with the said Seneca nation of Indians, at Buffalo creek, in the county of Ontario, and state of New-York, on the day of the date of these presents, by the honorable John Taylor, esquire, a commissioner appointed by the President of the United States to hold the same, in pursuance of the constitution, and of the act of the Congress of the United States, in such case made and provided, a convention was entered into in the presence and with the approbation of the said commissioner, between the said Seneca nation of Indians and the said Wilhelm Willink, Pieter Van Eeghen, Hendrik Vollenhoven, W. Willink the younger, 1. Willink the younger (son of Jan) Jan Gabiel Van Staphorst, Roelof Van Staphorst the younger, Cornelis Vollenhoven, and Hendrik Seye, by the said Joseph Ellicott, their agent and attorney, lawfully constituted and appointed for that purpose. Now This Indenture Witnesseth, That the said parties of the first part, for and in consideration of the lands hereinafter described, do...

Treaty of July 20, 1831

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at Lewistown, in the county of Logan, and State of Ohio, on the twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, by and between James B. Gardiner, specially appointed commissioner on the part of the United States, and John McElvain, Indian agent for the Wyandots, Senecas and Shawnees, on the one part, and the undersigned principal chiefs and warriors of the mixed band of Senecas and Shawnee Indians residing at and around the said Lewistown, of the other part; for the cession of the lands now owned and occupied by said band, lying on the waters of the Great Miami river, and within the territorial limits of the organized county of Logan, in said State of Ohio. Whereas the President of the United States, under the authority of the Act of Congress, approved May 28th, 1830, has appointed a special commissioner to confer with the different Indian tribes residing within the constitutional limits of the State of Ohio, and to offer for their acceptance the provisions contained in the before recited act. And whereas the mixed band or tribes of Seneca and Shawnee Indians residing at and around Lewistown in said State have expressed their perfectas sent to the conditions of said act, and their willingness and anxiety to remove west of the Mississippi river, in order to obtain a more permanent and advantageous home for themselves and their posterity: Therefore, in order to carry into effect the aforesaid objects, the following articles have been agreed upon by the aforesaid contracting parties; which,...

Treaty of February 28, 1831

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at the City of Washington, on the twenty-eight day of February, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, by and between James B. Gardiner, specially appointed Commissioner on the part of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned, principal Chiefs and Warriors of the Seneca tribe of Indians, residing on the Sandusky river in the State of Ohio, on the part of said tribe, of the other part; for the cession of the lands now owned and occupied by the said tribe of Indians, lying on the waters of the Sandusky river, and situate within the territorial limits of the organized counties of Seneca and Sandusky, in said State of Ohio. Whereas the tribe of Seneca Indians, residing on Sandusky River, in the State of Ohio, have earnestly solicited the President of the United States to negotiate with them, for an exchange of the lands, now owned and occupied by them, for lands of the United States, west of the river Mississippi, and for the removal and permanent settlement of said tribe: Therefore, in order to carry into effect the aforesaid objects, the following articles have been agreed upon: Article I.The Seneca tribe of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do forever cede, release and quit claim to the United States, the lands granted to them, by patent, in fee simple, by the sixth section of the Treaty, made at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami River of Lake Erie, on the...

Treaty of December 29, 1832

Articles of agreement, made and concluded at the Seneca agency, on the head waters of the Cowskin river, this 29th day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, by and between Henry. L. Ellsworth and John F. Schermerhorn, Commissioners, on behalf of the United States, and the Chiefs and Headmen of the “United Nation” of the Senecas and Shawnee Indians, on behalf of said Tribe or Nation. Whereas certain articles of agreement and convention were concluded at Lewistown, Ohio, on the 20th day of July, A. D. 1831, by and between the United States and the Chiefs and Warriors of the mixed band of the Senecas and Shawnee Indians, residing at or near Lewistown, in the State of Ohio: And whereas, by the 2nd article of said agreement, the United States stipulated and agreed, with said Tribe, in the words following, to wit: “to grant by patent, in fee simple, to them, and their heirs forever, as long as they shall exist as a nation and remain on the same, a tract of land, to contain sixty thousand acres, to be located under the direction of the President of the United States, contiguous to the lands granted to the Senecas of Sandusky, by the treaty made with them at the City of Washington, on the 28th of February 1831, and the Cherokee settlements. The east line of said tract shall be within two miles of the west line of the lands granted to the Senecas of Sandusky; and the south line shall be within two miles of the north line of the...
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