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Biography of S. R. Geddis

S.R. GEDDIS. – Mr. Geddis, a portrait of whom, together with a view of his beautiful home farm, appears in this history, is a leading and wealthy citizen of Kittitass county. He is one of the men whose success in life has been mainly achieved in the county in which he now lives by the exercise of economy, industry and business integrity, guided by intelligent financial ability. He is now a rich man, while but a few years ago he came to the Kittitass valley with nothing but an unblemished reputation as his entire capital. Mr. Geddis was born in Warren county, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1838, and was the eldest son of Robert and Margaret Nash Geddis. Six years later, he with his parents moved west to Louisa county, Iowa, where in 1845 our subject suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. In 1846 his mother married William Clum, and in the spring of that year started across the plains to Oregon, arriving in the following September. They first located on a farm in Linn county, where Mr. Geddis remained until 1865. During the Rogue river war in 1855, Mr. Geddis joined Captain, afterwards General Williams’ company, with whom he served for a time, and then joined Captain Hugh O’Neil’s company, with whom he remained until the close of hostilities in 1865. He moved to Umatilla, Umatilla county, and followed farming and freighting until 1869. He then came to Eastern Washington, and, being so favorably impressed with Kittitass county, concluded to make it his future home, and located one hundred and twenty acres near the present site...

Biography of General Joseph Lane

GENERAL JOSEPH LANE. – Joseph Lane first saw the light of day in North Carolina, December 14, 1801. He was reared in Henderson county, Kentucky. At the early age of twenty he was married to Miss Polly Hart, soon afterwards settling in Vanderburg county, Indiana, where he followed the humble life of a farmer for twenty-five years. While in the pursuit of this occupation, he was prominent as a leader in all matter of enterprise in the county. He soon drifted into politics, and was chosen to represent the county in the state legislature. He was continued in the same trust as long as he resided in the county. When the Mexican war began, the state senator resigned his seat, and prepared to enter the hostilities, when he was elected colonel of the Second Regiment of Indian Volunteers, and was ordered to report for duty at General Taylor’s headquarters at Brazos, Texas, which was then the seat of war. It was just prior to the battle of Buena Vista that General Lane was actively employed; and he took an active part in the glorious victory achieved by the American troops, commanding the left wing of Taylor’s army. During this engagement he was severely wounded by a bullet in the left shoulder; but, nothing daunted, he remained upon the field at his post of duty, suffering great pain, until the victory was assured. This act distinguished him for his unfaltering bravery. He was lauded by his commander; and he immediately attained a position in public estimation second to no other officer in the service. At the expiration of the time...

Biography of Henry H. Woodward

HENRY H. WOODWARD. – The life of a pioneer of any country is a hard one. But the pioneer of the Pacific coast had really more to contend with than his early brother of any other state east or west of the great Mother of Waters. His daily life was not only one of almost unendurable hardship and privation, with the eternal gnawings of want; but it was also beset with imminent danger; and he was in continued dread of death from the poisoned arrow of the red man, or his more fortunate fellow who used a gun. The pioneer of this coast held himself in ever readiness to go to the front, at a moment’s call, to assist in the subjugation of the various bands of Indians who held retreats in the mountain fastnesses which chain and interchain the country on every side, and who were continually swooping down upon the little handful of settlers in every section, and ofttimes massacring them before the news of their arrival could be sent form house to house. Taking a complete history of all the tribes that ever inhabited this continent, as far as we have any knowledge, the tribes which roamed the Pacific coast at will for untold ages, were the most treacherous, brutal, savage and warlike, perhaps because they were virtually cut off from the rest of the world; and, while the march of civilization was gradually pressing its way westward, and their kindred tribes in the more eastern states were being treated with and placed under control, they were as wild as the more primitive bands which preceded...

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