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Biography of Paul Brigham

Hon. Paul Brigham, son of Paul and Catharine (Turner) Brigham, born in Coventry, Connecticut, January 17, 1746; married, October 3, 1767, Lydia Sawyer, of Hebron, Connecticut; came to Norwich from Coventry, in the spring of 1782, bringing his family with him, all of his children having been born in Connecticut. In 1788, he built the house on ”Brigham Hill,” for many years occupied by his great-granddaughter, the late Miss Louisa D. Brigham. The farm had been previously owned and occupied by Elihu Baxter. In what esteem Mr. Brigham was held by the people of his adopted state and town, is shown under appropriate heads in other places in this volume. Captain Paul Brigham in the Revolutionary Army, June-August 1777. Mr. Brigham served four years as Captain in the Continental Army in a Connecticut regiment commanded, first, by Colonel Chandler and afterwards by Colonel Isaac Sherman. He entered the Army January 1, 1777, and was discharged April 22, 1781. A portion of the time he served under the immediate command of Washington, and was engaged in the important battles of Germantown, Monmouth, and Fort Mifflin. He was enlisted by General McDougal from Coventry, Conn., and his regiment seems to have been largely composed of men from that section of the State. We have been privileged to read a fragment of a diary kept by Captain Brigham during a part of his army service above the “Highlands,” which does not cover the time when any of the above named battles were fought (at that time the portion of the army to which he was attached was serving on the Hudson River), and...

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were occasionally forced to give food and shelter to both, which aroused the jealousy of both the Indian allies of the English and the American frontiersmen, although they preserved the strictest neutrality. In February 1772, the American settlers (nothing more could be expected) assumed to believe that the Moravian, or Christian Indians; as they were called, harbored the hostile Indians; therefore they pronounced them enemies, and at once doomed them to destruction. Accordingly on the following march, ninety volunteers, under the leadership of one David Williamson, started for Gnadenbrutten where they arrived on the morning of the 8th, and at once surrounded and entered the station; but found the most of the Indians in a field gathering corn. They told them they had come in peace and friendship, and with a proposition to move them from their unpleasant and dangerous position between the two hostile races to Fort Pitt for their better protection. The unsuspecting Indians, delighted at the suggestion of their removal to a safer place, gave up their few...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January.1 It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the spring of 1776, by both Colonel Bedell and Colonel Warner. Again on the 7th of March Colonel Morey writes to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety: “Some recruiting officers from Colonel Warner‘s party [regiment] have enlisted a considerable number of fine men, they had the money to...

The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

Return of Officers in Third Regiment New Hampshire

A return of the rank and occurrences that have happened to the Officers of the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment from 8 Nov, 1776 to 1 Jan, 1780. Name Rank From what time to what time Remarks Alex Scammell 2nd Lieut 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Jan 1780 Henry Dearborn promoted to Major Lieut Col 8 Nov 1776 – 19 Sep 1777 19 Sep 1977 Andrew Colburn Lieut Col Nov 1776 – 19 Sep 1777 Killed Sep 19, 1777 James Norris promoted to Captain Major Nov 1776 – 1 Jun 1778 20 Sep 1777 Nicholas Gilman promoted to Adjutant Captain 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Jun 1778 1 Jun 1778 William Weeks Pay Mast 8 Nov 1778 – 1 Jun 1778 Resigned James Blanchard promoted to Q Mast Lieut/PM 8 Nov 1778 – 1 Jun 1778 1 Jun 1778 Ivory Hovey Surgeon 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Feb 1778 Appointed to Col. Wigglesworth’s Reg. 1 Feb. Edmund Chadwick promoted to Mate Surgeon 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Mar 1778 1 Mar 1778 – 9 Sep 1778 Resigned Jacob Hall Jr. Surgeon 1 Oct 1778 – 1 Jan 1780 Isaac Smith Mate 1 Aug 1778 – 1 Jan 1780 James Gray Captain 8 Nov 1776 – left the service 4 Jan 1778 and drew pay till 1 Jun following. Joseph Huntoon Lieut 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Sept 1778 wounded & left the service Adna Penniman Lieut 8 Nov 1776 – 1 Jan 1780 Jonathan Cass promoted to Ensign Lieut 8 Nov 1776 – 4 Aug 1777 4 Aug 1777 Zacheriah Beal Captain 8 Nov 1776 – 6 Nov 1777 Killed...

Biographical Sketch of Crispus Attucks

Attucks, Crispus, An Indian-negro half-blood of Framingham, Mass., near Boston, noted as the leader and first person slain in the Boston massacre of Mar. 5, 1770, the first hostile encounter between the Americans and the British troops, and therefore regarded by historians as the opening fight of the great Revolutionary struggle. In consequence of the resistance of the people of Boston to the enforcement of the recent tax laws a detachment of British troops had been stationed in the town, to the great irritation of the citizens. On Mar. 5 this feeling culminated in an attack on the troops in front of the old State House, by a crowd made up largely of sailors, and said to have been led by Attucks, although this assertion has been denied by some. The troops retaliated by firing into the party, killing four men, of whom Attucks was the first to fall. A monument to his memory was erected in Boston Common by the commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1888. Although the facts in regard to his personality are disputed, the evidence goes to show that Attucks was a sailor, almost a giant in stature, the son of a negro father and all Indian mother of Framingham, or the neighboring village of Natick, formerly the principal Indian mission settlement of Massachusetts. The name Attucks, derived from his mother, appears to be the Natick (Massachuset) ahtuk, or attuks, ‘small deer.’ See G. Bancroft, Hist. U. S.; Appleton’s Encyclop. Am. Biog.; Am. Hist. Rec., I, Nov....

An Account of the McGillivray Family, The Revolutionary War

War had now raged between the mother country and her colonies of North America for more than three years. It had become fierce and sanguinary along the Atlantic. But the people of West Florida, whose government was composed chiefly of military dependencies, had hitherto enjoyed peace. They were mostly loyal subjects of the King. But now, even in this remote region, the contest began to be felt. The Creek Indians were relied upon, mainly, by the British authorities, to harass the Whig inhabitants of Georgia and Carolina. They had stationed at Hickory Ground, the site of the lower suburbs of the modern Wetumpka, Colonel Tait, an English officer, of captivating address, for the purpose of influencing the Creeks in behalf of the King. There, he soon became acquainted with the most gifted and remarkable man that ever was born upon the soil of Alabama, the history of whose family will now be given. A Scotch boy, of sixteen years of age, who had read of the wonders to be seen in America, ran away from his wealthy and respectable parents, living in Dunmaglass, and entered a ship which was bound for South Carolina. He arrived, without accident, at the port of Charleston. Young Lachlan McGillivray there first set his foot upon American soil. He then had no property, except a shilling in his pocket, a suit of clothes upon his back, a red head, a stout frame, an honest heart, a fearless disposition, and cheerful spirits, which seldom became depressed. About this period, the English were conducting an extensive commerce with the Cherokees, Chickasaws and those of the Creeks...

Alabama Revolutionary War Soldiers – B Surnames

BACON, RICHARD, aged 73, and a resident of Madison County; private and commissary Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on December 31, 1832, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $73.33.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. BAGWELL, FREDERICK, a resident of Fayette County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on August 20, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $50. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. He resided in Fayette county, June 1, 1840, aged 80.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. BAILES, ELDRIDGE, aged 74, and a resident of Madison County; private S. C. Continental Line; enrolled on January 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $75; sums received to date of publication of list, $225.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. BAILY, MOSES, aged 79, and a resident of Madison County; private Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on January 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80, sums received to date of publication of list, $240.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. BAILY, REUBEN, aged 70, and a resident of Limestone County; private S. C. Continental Line; enrolled on April 25, 1825, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from March 4, 1825; annual allowance, $96; suns received to date...
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