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Condition of the Mississippi Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Mississippi, counted in the general census, number 2,030 (1,044 males and 992 females), and are distributed as follows: Attala County, 24; Greene County, 37; Hancock County, 39; Hinds County, 14; Jasper County, 179; Kemper County, 34; Lauderdale County, 14; Leake County, 435; Neshoba, County, 623; Newton County, 349; Perry County, 38; Scott County, 123; Sharkey County 12; Winston County, 41; other counties (9 or less in each), 74. To the east of the gate capital in Mississippi in the uplands are a number of counties not traversed by any railroad, and therefore locally known as cow counties from their dependence for communication on roads and trails, suggestive of cow paths. The greater part of the Indians of the state are out in contiguous cow counties. They are remnants of The Five Civilized Tribes, mainly Choctaws, descendants in part of those who originally were found in this region and did not go west of the Mississippi river, and partly representing those who from time to, time have returned from the west. These people generally own little patches of a few acres, which they cultivate and add to their means of living by working for others, hunting, and some simple handicraft. In the spring they go into the larger towns to dispose of such pelts as they may have collected and sell baskets made in considerable numbers from the cane. White, boys in the towns at the season are generally supplied with blowguns, made by these Indians from the hollow cane stems, and furnished with darts fitted with feathers or cotton down. Wild blackberries for a...

Case Findings on the McKennon Roll

The following are various US Supreme Court case findings concerning the McKennon Roll. U.S. Supreme Court Winton V. Amos, 255 U.S. 373 (1921) 255 U.S. 373 Winton et al. V. Amos et al. No. 6. Bounds V. Same. No. 7. London V. Same. No. 8. Field Et Al. V. Same. No. 9. Beckham V. Same. No. 10. Vernon V. Same. No. 11. Howe V. Same. No. 12. Argued Jan. 14 and 15, 1919 Restored to Docket for Reargument Jan. 5, 1920. Reargued April 21 and 22, 1920. Decided March 7, 1921. [255 U.S. 373, 375]   Mr. William W. Scott, of Washington, D. C., for appellants Winton and others. Mr. Guion Miller, of Baltimore, Md., for other appellants. Mr. Assistant Attorney General Davis, for the United States. Mr. Justice PITNEY delivered the opinion of the Court. These are appeals from a judgment of the Court of Claims rejecting claims for alleged services rendered and expenses incurred in the matter of the claims of the Mississippi Choctaws to citizenship in the Choctaw Nation. The decision of the Court of Claims is reported in 51 Ct. Cl. 284. In the Winton Case (No. 6), a request for additional findings, equivalent to an application for rehearing, was denied, 52 Ct. Cl. 90. The appeals were taken under section 182, Jud. Code (Comp. St. 1173). The jurisdiction of the court below arose under an Act of April 26, 1906 (chapter 1876, 9, 34 Stat. 137, 140), and an [255 U.S. 373, 376] amendatory provision in the Act of May 29, 1908 (chapter 216, 27, 35 Stat. 444, 457). The former provided: Discover your...

Choctaw Indian Research

Choctaw (possibly a corruption of the Spanish chcdu, ‘flat’ or ‘flattened,’ alluding to the custom of these Indians of flattening the head). An important tribe of the Muskhogean stock, formerly occupying middle and south Mississippi, their territory extending, in their most flourishing days, for some distance east of Tombigbee River, probably as far as Dallas County, Ga. Ethnically they belong to the Choctaw branch of the Muskhogean family, which included the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Hunt and their allies, and some small tribes which formerly lived along Yazoo River. Archives, Libraries and Genealogy Societies Societies Oklahoma Historical Society Indian Archives Holdings Summary Oklahoma Genealogical Society United States Court – Indian Territory 1890 Census – Indian Territory, Old Towson County, Choctaw Nation Choctaw Indian Biography Choctaw Chiefs Pushmataha – Tribal Chief (Push-ma-ta-ha) Peter P. Pitchlynn Allen Wright (hosted at Native American Resources) Mushalatubee(hosted at Native American Resources) Peter Perkins Pitchlynn(hosted at Native American Resources) Choctaw Chiefs (hosted at Choctaw Nation) The Life of Okah Tubbee Bureau of Indian Affairs A Guide to Tracing your Indian Ancestry(PDF) Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Choctaw Indian Cemeteries Mount Tabor Indian Cemetery -Texas (hosted at Paul and Dottie Ridenour’s Home Page) Indian Cemeteries (hosted at Accessgenealogy) Choctaw Indian Census 1860 Federal Census Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (hosted at Indian Nations, OKGenWeb Archives) Choctaw, Part 1 Choctaw, Part 2 1885 Choctaw Census (Original records of Rusty Lang from ChoctawWeb) Atoka County Blue County Boktoklo County Cedar County Eagle County Gaines County Jack Forks County Kiamitia County Red River County San Bois County Skulyville County Sugar Loaf County Tobucksy County Towson County Wade County...

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