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Mexican War Records

The Mexican–American War was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848 in the wake of the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered part of its territory despite the 1836 Texas Revolution. In addition to a naval blockade off the Mexican coast, American forces invaded and conquered New Mexico, California, and parts of what is currently northern Mexico. Another American army captured Mexico City, forcing Mexico to agree to the sale of its northern territories to the U.S. Territorial expansion of the United States to the Pacific coast was the goal of President James K. Polk, the leader of the Democratic Party.[1] However, the war was highly controversial in the U.S., with the Whig Party and anti-slavery elements strongly opposed. The major consequence of the war was the forced Mexican Cession of the territories of California and New Mexico to the United States in exchange for $15 million. In addition, the United States forgave debt owed by the Mexican government to U.S. citizens. 1846-1848 Requesting Military Records Cemeteries US Military National Cemeteries Burial Search US Military State Cemeteries Burial Listings (hosted at American Battle Monuments Commission) Online Records The Mexican War (hosted at Lone Star Internet) Mexican War (hosted at Son of the South) Time Line Mexican War Map US Generals and Leaders Key Battles US – Mexican War (hosted at PBS) Prelude to War Biographies, United States and Mexico US Mexican War (hosted at Descendants of Mexican War Veterans) A Concise History of the US-Mexican War Mexican War (hosted at Price of Freedom) Navy in the Mexican War (hosted at Naval...

Allin, Illinois, Political and War Record

Unlike the greater portion of McLean County, Allin is Democratic. In all State and national questions, it turns out strongly for the old party which it has honored with its suffrage for so many years. In township elections, the dominant party is generally remembered, although the returns do not always show strict party tendencies. Further than a general scare, we hear of no harm from the Indian war of 1832. If there were persons who enlisted in the companies sent out from this county, we were not fortunate enough to learn their names. They rest in their unknown graves, with hone to cherish their deeds of valor. Allen Palmer and Joseph Bozarth were in the Mexican war. These were all, we suppose, that were among the few whom the Government accepted to fight its battles ; for it will be remembered that of the 8,370 men who offered themselves from the State of Illinois, only 3,720 could be accepted. During the war of the rebellion, Allin furnished its share of men for the defense of the Union. We learned the names of the following who gave their lives to the cause : Austin Bond died from the effects of the measles ; James Gourley, John Brooks and Josiah Bozarth died while in the United States service ; William Ryan volunteered and was captured and paroled, when he returned home. Afterward he went again as a teamster, and was kicked to death by a rebellious mule. If any fell in battle we know them not. To meet an enemy on the field of battle, and there to be shot down...

Biography of James R. Daniel

JAMES R. DANIEL. – The subject of this sketch was born in 1826, and has lived a life that might well be described in poetry as succinct as that in which Othello related his own. The son of a machinist and shipbuilder of Philadelphia, Mr. Daniel early learned naval craft on the schoolship North Carolina in New York harbor, and on the brig Washington of the Coast Survey, and was then transferred to the Independence and Potomac. After his honorable discharge from the United States navy, he made voyages as able seaman to Havre and Liverpool, and to the West Indies. In 1846 he joined the United States army to subdue Mexico, and was in the exciting scenes of that war until its close, being one of the number to witness the planting of the American colors on the old Aztec capitol. He was in the quartermaster’s department, and at one time had charge of a mule train, loaded with silver dollars, from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico. He was engaged for a time after the war in business at that old city, and in 1850 came to the mines of California. With almost every passing year he encountered new romances and adventures. He was with the banished Mobile Guard of France, and served as scout to quell the Indians of the Stanislaus in California. In the month of July, 1852, he sailed for Australia, and on the way prospected the Samoan Islands of Tutuila. After mining in Australia, he came to Oregon, and on Althouse, and Klamath rivers mined with success. On Sucker creek he lost...

Biography of Hon. Charles P. Cooke

HON. CHARLES P. COOKE – The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Erie county, Ohio, in 1824. His early life was spent in his native place. In 1846 he went as a volunteer to the Mexican war, and served as second lieutenant in the first regiment of Ohio Volunteers. He was in the army a full year, and participated in the engagements at Monterey, Buena Vista and other bloody battles of that war. He then returned home, but in the spring of 1849 left for the Pacific coast, crossing the plains with ox-teams to California, where he remained until the spring of 1850, when he came to Oregon, arriving at Astoria in May. He resided in Polk county until 1867, when he emigrated to the Yakima country, taking his first claim in the Moxee valley. In 1870 he removed to the Kittitass valley, and has remained there until the present time. Mr. Cooke represented the Yakima and Klikitat counties in the legislature of 1873, and gain was representative of Yakima county in 1876. He represented Yakima and Kittitas counties jointly in 1886, and is now joint councilman for Yakima, Kittitass, Franklin, Adams, Lincoln and Douglas counties. He was the first auditor elected in Yakima county, and one of the county commissioners, and has been several times school superintendent. He also filed important offices of trust in Oregon as well as in this territory. He assisted in organizing the counties of Yakima and Kittitass. Mr. Cooke has developed a beautiful ranch, upon which he now lives. This is about twelve miles from Ellensburgh,...

Biography of Major Theodore J. Eckerson

MAJOR THEODORE J. ECKERSON. – Major Eckerson, so long and favorably known among the old pioneers of our coast, enjoys also a like enviable reputation in military circles. He was born January 22, 1821, in New York City, and on December 20, 1838, in his eighteenth year, entered the United States army. He served throughout the Seminole Indian war, 1840-42, and in the Mexican war from its commencement to its close. He was a member of the storming parties in the battles of Cerro Gordo and Churubusco. He came to Oregon with the first troops sent after the settlement with England, arriving at Fort Vancouver May 15, 1849. He here established and taught the first school north of the Columbia river in the then territory of Oregon, for the benefit of American settlers, under the auspices of Governor Joseph Lane, and the military commander, Major John S. Hatheway. He was commissioned an officer in the storekeeper’s branch of the United States ordnance department in September, 1853, and held the position until March 21, 1865, when he was appointed to a commission in the United States quartermaster’s department. He was brevetted a major March 21, 1865, “for faithful and meritorious services,” and promoted to the full rank of major January 24, 1881. He served actively until January 22, 1885, when he was retired by law, being then sixty-four years of age. Major Eckerson’s wife, Elizabeth, to whom he was married in New York, accompanied him to the Pacific coast, and remained constantly at his side, sharing all the vicissitudes of service in this far-off country. Four sons and two daughters...

Biography of Hon. John Kelly

HON. JOHN KELLY. – Prominent in almost every department of business and public life, Honorable John Kelly is known throughout the length and breadth of our state as a man of great abilities and irreproachable integrity. As a pioneer, none has a more deserving record, nor has sustained amore honorable part. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1818, he crossed the Atlantic to Canada in 1838, and in 1840 came to Franklin, Vermont. Three years later he began a career at the West, coming to Wisconsin, and there exercising his natural bent for business and capacity for organization, by which he has been distinguished, established a small woolen factory. But, finding the conditions unfavorable for a business of the dimensions that he desired to control, he sold out his interest and removed to St. Louis, seeking a wider opportunity. There he was led by his love of adventure to enlist for service in the Mexican war. In January of 1848 he was quartered with his regiment at Fort Leavenworth; and not until June following was the command ready to move to the seat of war. While en route, at Santa Fé, news was received that the war was over; and the regiment was ordered back to Jefferson Barracks. In 1849 Mr. Kelly received an appointment as wagon-master in the battalion of Colonel Loring to proceed to Fort Vancouver on the Columbia. Experiencing cholera on the plains of the Nebraska, and, as drover of the companies loose stock, to which he had been subsequently assigned, meeting with unreasonable treatment, he disconnected himself from the train this side of Fort Hall, and...

Biography of General Joseph Lane

GENERAL JOSEPH LANE. – Joseph Lane first saw the light of day in North Carolina, December 14, 1801. He was reared in Henderson county, Kentucky. At the early age of twenty he was married to Miss Polly Hart, soon afterwards settling in Vanderburg county, Indiana, where he followed the humble life of a farmer for twenty-five years. While in the pursuit of this occupation, he was prominent as a leader in all matter of enterprise in the county. He soon drifted into politics, and was chosen to represent the county in the state legislature. He was continued in the same trust as long as he resided in the county. When the Mexican war began, the state senator resigned his seat, and prepared to enter the hostilities, when he was elected colonel of the Second Regiment of Indian Volunteers, and was ordered to report for duty at General Taylor’s headquarters at Brazos, Texas, which was then the seat of war. It was just prior to the battle of Buena Vista that General Lane was actively employed; and he took an active part in the glorious victory achieved by the American troops, commanding the left wing of Taylor’s army. During this engagement he was severely wounded by a bullet in the left shoulder; but, nothing daunted, he remained upon the field at his post of duty, suffering great pain, until the victory was assured. This act distinguished him for his unfaltering bravery. He was lauded by his commander; and he immediately attained a position in public estimation second to no other officer in the service. At the expiration of the time...

Biography of M. B. Valodin

M. B. Valodin, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Oakland; born in Portsmouth, Scioto Co., Ohio, March 28, 1828; at 8 years of age, he removed with his parents to New Madrid, Mo., living there until 1838, at which time his father died, when he removed with his mother and sister to Edgar Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming until 1844, with the exception of one year in which he attended school in Paris; he then went to Wisconsin, where he was engaged at work in the shot tower at Helena, six months, and followed mining the same length of time, when he enlisted for the Mexican war, at which time the Government having trouble with the Indians, he, with his regiment, was employed in Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota in removing the Indians to their reservation, until 1848; he then returned to Edgar Co., Ill., and followed farming until 1849, when he removed to Coles Co., and engaged in farming and raising and dealing in stock until 1864, at which date he located in Oakland, and to the above business engaged in the dry goods trade until 1866, when he sold his store and was appointed agent of the Illinois Midland Railroad, at Oakland, which position he held one year, and at the same time continued his farming and stock business, also dealing in lumber for one year; he removed upon his present place in the spring of 1878; his home farm contains 455 acres, upon which he has good buildings; he also owns twenty acres of timber and one block and seven lots in Oakland, upon which he...

Biographical Sketch of A. F. Shaw

A. F. Shaw, Police Magistrate, Charleston; is a native of Illinois; he was born in Paris, Edgar Co., Feb. 10, 1824; he is a son of Smith and Elizabeth Shaw; his father was born in North Carolina; was raised in South Carolina, and when a young man, emigrated to Tennessee, and from there to Kentucky; he was one of the pioneers of Missouri, from which State he was several times driven by the Indians; he afterward came to Illinois, long prior to its admission as a State, and finally, in 1822, settled in Paris, where he died about sixteen years later; Mr. Shaw learned the saddler’s trade at the age of 15, and followed it till the breaking-out of the Mexican war; he then volunteered in Col. Baker’s 4th I. V. I., and was elected 2d Lieutenant of Co. H; he marched with Gen. Taylor’s army through Mexico, from Matamoras to Tampico, and afterward participated in the siege of Vera Cruz and the battle of Cerro Gordo; returning at the end of a year’s service, he engaged in business in Paris. In 1850, he crossed the plains to California, and engaged in mining; on his return, three years later, he went to Carthage, Hancock Co., Ill., where he carried on the saddlery business till 1856. He was married in May, 1854, to Miss Lucy A. Bunnell, a daughter of William Bunnell, of Charleston; in 1856, he removed to Charleston, and after a short time returned to Paris, where he resided till 1869, since which time he has been a resident of Charleston; he kept the Union House till 1874,...
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