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1757, July 11, Muster Roll of Cap’t John Stuarts Comapany

THE PUBLICK TO CAPTAIN JOHN STUART’S COMPANY 1757 1756 March 25 To Amount of Captain’s pay from 15 July 1756 to this day 878.10 Sept 20 By Cash reed. of John Chivellette; Esq, 1015. To Amount of Lieutenants pay from De 418.6.8 By 2 months pay to Lieut. Adamson from De 100. To Amount of Ensigns pay from De 251. By 2 months, pay to Ensign Anderson from De 60. To Amount of pay due to Serjants & private men from the time of their Respective inlistments to this day 7113.16.8 1757 Feby. 15 By 6 months pay Received of the Treasurer for the Captain as & Receipt 630. 8661.13.4 Ballance due to Comp. to this 25th day of March 1757 1805. £8661.13 Fort Loudoun 25th March 1757 John Stuart Captain I do hereby Certifye that this is an Exact Muster Roll of Cap’t. John Stuarts Company, Fort Loudoun July 11th 1757John Chevillette Sir Be pleased to order payment of the above ballance to Mefsrs. Ogelvy and Ward they being appointed agents for the Company under my Command Your Excellency most obedient and most humble Servt.John...

1759, December 3, Fort Loudoun

Sir The Adjoyning was intended to have been Conveyed to your Excelency by some pack horsemen. Who sell out for the Settlements. The 22d Ultimate, but upon some Repost they heard at Heywafsee they thought proper to Return. It will now be delivered by Mr. Ellitot with whom the Little Carpenter Setts out with this day The Jealousy which has Long Subsisted between Old Hop and the Carpenter is come to am open quarell, the former having at a Meeting in Chote Town house, Lately, Accused the Carpenter of being Enemy to his Country, and a Servil dependent upon the English and Aay, that he has constantly thwarted and frustrated his endeaours to make peace with the French by running out to war against them, at the Same time he spoke Contempuously of Abilities as a Warrior this has Greatly incensed the Little man who in his _______has ordered his peole, to Look no Longer on Old Hop as their head beloved man, declaring that he himself would Supply his place in that Capacity, for the future and I am concern heintends to Avail himself on his Credit with Your Excellency and of the presents Emergincy for Establishing his Authority The Indians The Indians are very Cever but cannot hide their fears. They Continue to Supply the fort with corn hoggs & Fowls as usual, and of Late they have had no mefsengers Running to the Creeks & French as usual. The Officers Join me in wishing Your Excelly. All Sucefs and prosperity and I have the honour of being most Respectfully Sir Your Excellency’s most obedient and most...

1759, August 1, An Indian Woman Called the buffolow

Skin/ who formerly gave Capt. Raymond Demere an Account o the Agreement between the Tellico people & the French at new Orlean’s, Wnet from this about two Months ago, in Company with Some Other’s on a Journey to the Creek Nation, & in there way Called at this new Settled place Ettuea, where they were Joind by the Mortar & his Gang & proceeded to that Nation & from thence to the French Fort, & being return’d gives the Following Account That when she was within two day’s Journey of the Elliqu_’s or the Hillobu’s a Creek town, in Company with the Oakjoy Warriour, That the said Warriour Immediately Sent to the French fort, to Acquaint them of his Coming with the Cherokee people, who joined _____ Sent of two French men to meet him with two cag’s of Liquor, The Cherokee’s then said to each other that Certainly this Warriour was in Great Esteem’d among the French, for we have often been at the English & Never had such an Invittation as this, that when they came in sight of the Oakjoy Town they halted, & was Meet by two French Men, with Shirts in their arms & Some bottles of rum, which they presented to the head men of the Creek’s & Cherokee’s & then they went Forward to the Chuncky Yard & in there way pafsed by the Oakjoy Warriour’s house, where the Said two French men that meet them Were, who received him very kindly and put on him a fine Ruffled Shirt. A haud waistcoat & hatt, & said that they Stai’d at that...

1759, April 10, Fort Loudoun

Most Honr. Sir, I Trouble you with ___ in Hopes you wd. Be so Indulgins as to Remember You kind Promise I have been here hear Two years but shod. The Service not Such wth. You to releave me wd. Very Readily Compound with your Excellency to Continue for any Time you shod. Think Proper not Excuding Two__if yor. Goodnefs wod. Excuse me hear to be sent ___for the Further I Understand ther’s a a likelihood of Severall Premotions in the In_ipend Company’s, I Hope you will be so kind as to see I ____ Have Justice done me being now the Eldest Ensign if ther’s any Attorations in the Service in my Favour shod. Be Infinitely oblig,d to you for a Sine as to __-Situations of our Affairs Here Referr you to Capt. Demere Lettrs. ____Report that 45 Cherrokees are gone to Warr against Virignia ___Oechoy warriour calld, ye Mortar Has been into Chotia & Poisiond thefs wth. ____Confounded French Talks but Hon it with End in nothing ___Tho’ its Said by Severall of the Paehko___men whom garthers There Intelliganiers from the Indians’ That ye French are Settling on the Highwafsiy River to Intersept ye Parr ___ages Hon, I have lately Rec’d, my Auot. From my Rercht. In 10th he Mentioned that ___6 ___10 Re_____. From ye to rasurr. For ye Expaneis at Keowhee. Mr. Loats affairs Cast ___50’ However I have ____an other opportunity, & Depend upon your goodnefs to find a Shethord” for my Res_lution & I Remain Sir Yor. Excellenceis Most Obedt. Hble. Servt. To Com,d John...

1757, July 23, Fort Loudoun Letter 1

Sir On the 20th Inftant M. Elliot came into the fort, and it seems that matters goes on very bad by the Oppinion the Indians have Consived of us so Suddenly, on Account of Jellousy for he want of the Ammunition, on Such a criticall Juncture of time, not only war, but they cant go out and kill a bit of meat for their family’s, that in Short they imagine we want oly a Large quantity of Privifsions and Ammunition in the fort, and then a body of men will come up and od what we pleafe with them, as we Deprive them from Ammunition and every thing else, after So many promifses to them, M. Elliot acquainted me that the next day there was to do a meeting at his houfe of Several headmen on this very Account, and that he thought they would not let him go to Charles Town, except Some few of them Should go with him, in order to know the Refon why they were not provided with thofe Necefsary’s that they want, I told him to bring them here, and I should be glad to Redrefs their greviances and if any of them would go to Charles Town with him that I would be glad, and Shall write to the Governour in their favour, and that ehy will be convinced in a Little time, that they are now settling a Trade on a proper footing for this Nation, and that I told them no Lyes, he Said he would propofe what I Said to them, and do what he could to bring them,...

1759, August 28, Fort Loudoun

Sir Your Dispatches of the 31st of July, I recd. By James Holmes: I acquainted your Excellency by Charles McCuningham of the Little Carpenter being gone to Warr, with thirty Young fellows and Willi_awaw, with him. He was no sooner gone but I found great attentions in the Disposition and Mind of the Indians; for he kept them very quiet. Tho’ I thank God I live here very easy, in the Upper Towns, and I hear no bad Talks, tho I do not know how long it will continue. I have Recd. Intelligence from the Lower Towns, that it is not so with them, and that they have very bad Talks, and bring White People’s Scalps every Day. They give out there (tho without any foundation) that the Little Carpenter is gone to the French Fort, to make a Peace with the French, and that as soon as he comes back, the Warr will Begin. They may say what they please, I do not believe it, and am almost sure of the company, for a little white before he went away he gave me all the Afsurance of Friendship for the English, and desird me not to mind what I was told in his absence that he was going for Fort Afsumption, to endeavour to a French Prisoner, that he might know what the French were about, and to go immediately to your Excellency that you might consult together, what was to be done afterwards. A Little While ago, hearing that the Slave Catcher of Chotee, and severall other Cherokee Indians, had been to the Albama Fort; and being...

1759, April 6, Fort Loudoun

Sir The 14th Isntn. Arrived the Exprefs with Dispatches from you Excellency, I hope James Holme’s whom I have sent with an Exprefs to Your Excellency is Arrived Safe, I afshure you When I sent Him, we did not know what to make of the Indian’s there was Nothing but bad talks Amongst them, & they had Meetings every day, Old Hopp & the Standing Turkey seem’d to Protect them verry much, I do not know what to make of Judge Friend, I have great reason to believe that Willinaway is sincere, he has been Constantly at there Meetings, And opposed them when they were giving bad talks, & has Allways Given me Notice of it, The other Day they had a Great Meeting Where all the head Men Where present & the Mortar finding that his Proposals were not Approved of by the Comisiners he began to drop his bad talks, deny’d that his Name was the Mortar, that he was Called the Wolf, & a friend to the English, & the next day went Away but said he wou’d Soon return, Some of the head men Afsured us we need not be under Any Apprehension for they wou’d not Give Ear to their bad talks, The exprefs has brought me a letter from the Little Carpenter, wherein he desired me to Acqua. Old Hopp, that he was Sorry to hear that there was bad talks Amongst them, & desires that he wou’d not give Earr to the Lyes that is pafsing through the Nation, that he has made up every thing with the Governour of Virginia, &...

1757, June 1, The Creek Nation

Dearest Friend, I hope your goodnefs will excuse the freedome of my Exprofsing my Self as it flows from a Sole truly sencible of the many remarcable Instances of friendship I havereed from you, A Detail of my trouble & misfortunes, can not be new to you as they must have reach’d your ears, before this time, The flights of ungovernd youth aded to my trouble of Leaveing Fort Loudoun Exageratied by the force of Excefsive Drinking at Theowee deprived me of my reason & has occasioned a misquidence in my Conduct which has thrown me into the utmost Trouble and Misery, its riported that I intended to go to the french but I most Solomosly Declare no such Design ever entered into my Immajination for I was on my way to Charlestown when Capt. Pepper sent after me and has ordered me Down undor a Guard having first taken from me my __ath’s, Sword & Pistols, & my Sirits are so Deprefs’d and weigh’d down with Care & _______that my Senses have allmost left me. Oh Wretched Man that I am Loaded with Care and covered with misfortunes for God sake my Dear Capt. Demere __frend me in this my verry great Trouble, I am sencible what influence your Letters have, Oh for God sake afsist me & Mke me your Vafe all that I may repay your goodnefs Oh my first friend If I have ever rendered my Service to you or the Publick place it first in yourvien God knows what they will do with me in Charles Town but I do most humble pray you...

1759, May 5, Fort Loudoun

Sir As j am incertain when j shall be relived, j have sent the Woman, that was the Care of the Store, to buy Some Necessares of Lift, by her j sent to your Excellency a test of jndian’s Baskets, and a Beaver’s Skin which j beg you will accept, and if any thing Else Cover these Mountains & is agreeable to you, j shall be obliged to you to send me your Orders, and j shall do my best Endeavour to get it. as Every Thing is quiet now in these Parts j have wrote to Lieut. Coytmore to not send men here for fear to disoblidge the jndians, till he should hear further from your Excellency, and in case j should hear of the approach of the Enemy j would sent for them, besides as Carriage for Provisions is very heavy on the Publick, and Some time very difficult, j a afraid that Some time or other, we should be in want having great Number of Men here. J shall allways thought that the Certificates of the People whom your Excellency approved of had been Constantly accepted, til the other Duy when four of them were Sent back again to me and a imagined they were as good as the Bank j did take them to make Payments in Town. J refer to Dr. Matin, and Dr. Richadrdson whether they could get any Linguster, except at 25 pds. Or month, and Even had ones, they get from the Traders 15 pds. Pr. Month and leave to load a Horse, and that j employ is the best Linguistor...

1759, September 12, Letters to Indian Affairs

Dear Coytmore, A few days afte Gallaher left this, the Setiquo People broke out in a very odd manner, sent four to way-lay the Fort, & kill’d Samuel Simmons within tow hundred Yards of the Corn Field (sho had just gone out to gather a few Grapes). The next Day thee was a Great Meeting at the fort, where all the Towns were present, & the Ammuntion that was stopt was strongly insisted for, as the means of making everything up; & that there was two Warriors to sett off for Kewohee for it, but wou’d not carry any Letter’s. Two Days ago the Person (Judges Friend) whom you complimented with a Sword,, at leaving of this, sent a Party to destroy our Cattle, & drive them off, but luckily misf’d of them, for we sent a Party of Men for them, who brought them in a different Road from that they took; and this very Person is at the Head of all this Mischief, & has sold those three Scalps to the French; & their Mefsenger sets off in two days. Yesterday they kill’d one William Veal that lives in Chittowee, which makes up the three Scalps they wanted. We are salting as fast as we can, tho’ I doubt it son’t keep; & have but fourteen Days flour in the Fort. No Flints & but ver little Match. The Roads are all block’d up, & no white Man suffer’d attempt to go off in the Night, Oreder is given to follow & kill them. Settiquo & Telliquo are the only Towns that have as yet broke out...
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