Treaty of March 13, 1862

Whereas a treaty was made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the then Territory, but now State, of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, A. D. 1859, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, and



Treaty of October 5, 1859

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the Territory of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and headmen representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, to wit:



Treaty of June 3, 1825

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the City of Saint Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States of America, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head Men, and Warriors of the Kansas Nation of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by said



Treaty of August 16, 1825

Whereas the Congress of the United States of America being anxious to promote a direct commercial and friendly intercourse between the citizens of the United States and those of the Mexican Republic, and, to afford protection to the same, did, at their last session, pass an act, which was approved the 3d of March, 1825,



Treaty of October 28, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at St. Louis between Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Kanzas Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf



Treaty of January 14, 1846

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Methodist Mission, in the Kansas country, between Thomas H. Harvey and Richard W. Cummins, commissioners of the United States, and the Kansas tribe of Indians. Article 1. The Kansas tribe of Indians cede to the United States two millions of acres of land on the east



Kansa Indians

The Kansas Indians were located usually on some part of the Kansas River, which derives its name from them.



Houses of the Kansa Tribe

Kansa Habitation

To quote from the Handbook: “Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated there from, the main body divided at the mouth of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca



Inchi

Inchi (In′tci, ‘stone lodge’). A village occupied by the Kansa in their migration up Kansas River. J. O. Dorsey, inf’n, 1882.1 FootnotesHodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. ↩



Kansa Indian Gentes

The Kansa gentes as given by Dorsey (15th Rep. B. A. E., 230, 1897) are: Manyinka (earth lodge) Ta (deer) Panka (Ponca) Kanze (Kansa) Wasabe (black bear) Wanaghe (ghost) Kekin (carries a turtle on his hack) Minkin (carries the sun on his back) Upan (elk) Khuva (white eagle) Han (night) lbache (holds the firebrand to



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