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Treaty of March 13, 1862

Whereas a treaty was made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the then Territory, but now State, of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, A. D. 1859, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, and authorized by said tribe for that purpose; which treaty, after having been submitted to the Senate of the United States for its constitutional action thereon, was duly accepted, ratified, and confirmed by the President of the United States, on the seventeenth day of November, A. D. 1860, with an amendment to the fourth article thereof, which amendment, first proposed and made by the Senate on the twenty-seventh day of June, A. D. 1860, was afterwards agreed to and ratified by the aforesaid chiefs and head-men of the Kansas tribe of Indians on the fourth day of October of the same year: Now, therefore, it is further agreed and concluded on this thirteenth day of March, A. D. 1862, by and between H. W. Farnsworth, a commissioner on the part of the United States, and the said Kansas tribe of Indians, by their authorized representatives, the chiefs and headmen thereof, to wit: Article 1. That the said treaty and the amendment thereof be further amended so as to provide that a fair and reasonable value of the improvements made by persons who settled on the diminished reserve of said Kansas Indians between the second day of December, A. D. 1856, and the fifth day of October, A. D. 1859, shall be ascertained by the Secretary...

Treaty of October 5, 1859

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the Territory of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and headmen representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, to wit: Ke-hi-ga-wah Chuffe, Ish-tal-a-sa, Ne-hoo-ja-in-gah, Ki-hi-ga-wat-te-in-gah, Ki-he-gah-cha, Al-li-ca-wah-ho, Pah-hous-ga-tun-gah, Ke-hah-lah-la-hu, Ki-ha-gah-chu, Ee-le-sun-gah, Wah-pah-jah, Ko-sah-mun-gee, Oo-ga-shama, Wah-Shumga, Wah-ti-inga, Wah-e-la-ga, Pa-ha-ne-ga-la, Pa-ta-go, Cahulle, Ma-she-tum, Wa-no-ba-ga-ha, She-ga-wa-sa, Ma-his-pa-wa-cha, Ma-shon-o-pusha, Ja-ha-sha-watanga, Ki-he-ga-tussa, and Ka-la-sha-wat-lumga, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Kansas Indians having now more lands than are necessary for their occupation and use, and being desirous of promoting settled habits of industry amongst themselves by abolishing the tenure in common by which they now hold their lands, and by assigning limited quantities thereof in severalty to the members of their tribe, owning an interest in their present reservation, to be cultivated and improved for their individual use and benefit, it is agreed and stipulated that that portion of their reservation commencing at the southwest corner of said reservation, thence north with the west boundary nine miles, thence east fourteen miles, thence south nine miles, thence west with the south boundary fourteen miles to the place of beginning, shall be set apart and retained by them for said purposes; and that out of the same there shall be assigned to each head of a family not exceeding forty acres, and to each member thereof not exceeding forty acres, and to each single male person of the age of twenty-one years and upwards not exceeding...

Treaty of June 3, 1825

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the City of Saint Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States of America, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head Men, and Warriors of the Kansas Nation of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by said Nation. Article 1. The Kansas do hereby cede to the United States all the lands lying within the State of Missouri, to which the said nation have title or claim; and do further cede and relinquish, to the said United States, all other lands which they now occupy, or to which they have title or claim, lying West of the said State of Missouri, and within the following boundaries: beginning at the entrance of the Kansas river into the Missouri river; from thence North to the North-West corner of the State of Missouri; from thence Westwardly to the Nodewa River, thirty miles from its entrance into the Missouri; from thence to the entrance of the big Nemahaw River into the Missouri, and with that river to its source; from thence to the source of the Kansas River, leaving the old village of the Pania Republic to the West; from thence, on the ridge dividing the waters of the Kansas river from those of the Arkansas, to the Western boundary of the State line of Missouri, and with that line, thirty miles, to the place of beginning. Article 2. From the cession aforesaid, the following reservation for the use of the Kansas nation of Indians shall be made, of a tract of land, to begin...

Treaty of August 16, 1825

Whereas the Congress of the United States of America being anxious to promote a direct commercial and friendly intercourse between the citizens of the United States and those of the Mexican Republic, and, to afford protection to the same, did, at their last session, pass an act, which was approved the 3d of March, 1825, “to authorize the President of the United States to cause a road to be marked out from the Western frontier of Missouri to the confines of New Mexico,” and which authorizes the President of the United States to appoint Commissioners to carry said act of Congress into effect, and enjoins on the Commissioners, so to be appointed, that they first obtain the consent of the intervening tribes of Indians, by treaty, to the marking of said road and to the unmolested use thereof to the citizens of the United States and of the Mexican Republic; and Benjamin H. Reeves, Geo. C. Sibley, and Thomas Mather, being duly appointed Commissioners as aforesaid, and being duly and fully authorized, have this day met the Chiefs and Head Men of the Kansas tribe of Indians, who, being all duly authorized to meet and negotiate with the said Commissioners upon the premises, and being specially met for that purpose, by the invitation of said Commissioners, on the Sora Kansas Creek, two hundred and thirty-eight miles Southwestwardly from Fort Osage; have, after due deliberation and consultation, agreed to the following Treaty, which is to be considered binding on the said Kansas Indians, from and after this day: Article 1. The Chiefs and Head Men of the Kansas Nation, or...

Treaty of October 28, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at St. Louis between Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Kanzas Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe, and of being placed, in all things, and in every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Kanzas tribe, and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. In witness whereof, the said Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twenty-eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen,...

Treaty of January 14, 1846

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Methodist Mission, in the Kansas country, between Thomas H. Harvey and Richard W. Cummins, commissioners of the United States, and the Kansas tribe of Indians. Article 1. The Kansas tribe of Indians cede to the United States two millions of acres of land on the east part of their country, embracing the entire width, thirty miles, and running west for quantity. Article 2. In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to pay to the Kansas Indians two hundred and two thousand dollars, two hundred thousand of which shall be funded at five per cent., the interest of which to be paid annually for thirty years, and thereafter to be diminished and paid pro rata, should their numbers decrease, but not otherwise—that is: the Government of the United States shall pay them the full interest for thirty years on the amount funded, and at the end of that time, should the Kansas tribe be less than at the first payment, they are only to receive pro rata the sums paid them at the first annuity payment. One thousand dollars of the interest thus accruing shall be applied annually to the purposes of education in their own country; one thousand dollars annually for agricultural assistance, implements, &c.; but should the Kansas Indians at any time be so far advanced in agriculture as to render the expenditure for agricultural assistance unnecessary, then the one thousand dollars above provided for that purpose shall be paid them in money with the balance of their annuity; the balance, eight thousand dollars, shall be...

Houses of the Kansa Tribe

To quote from the Handbook: “Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated there from, the main body divided at the mouth of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansa River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the, south side until they reached the present north boundary of Kansas, where they were attacked by the Cheyenne and compelled to retrace their steps. They settled again at the month of Kansas River, where the Big Knives, as they, called the whites, came with gifts a,  induced them to go farther west. The native narrators of this tradition give an account of about 20 villages occupied successively along Kansas River before the settlement at Council Grove, Kansas, whence they were finally removed to their reservation in Indian Territory. Marquette’s autograph map, drawn probably as early as 1674, places the Kansas a considerable distance directly west of the Osage and some distance south of the Omaha, indicating that they were then on Kansas River.  It is known that the Kansa moved up Kansas River in historic times as far as Big Blue River, and thence went to Council Grove in 1847. The move to the Big Blue must have taken place after 1723.” Thus it would appear that for many generations the villages of the Kansa had stood near...

Inchi

Inchi (In′tci, ‘stone lodge’). A village occupied by the Kansa in their migration up Kansas River. J. O. Dorsey, inf’n, 1882.1FootnotesHodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604,...

Kansa Tribe

Kansa Indians. A southwestern Siouan tribe; one of the five, according to Dorsey’s arrangement, of the Dhegiha group. Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated therefrom, the main body divided at the month of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansas River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the south side until they reached the present north boundary of Kansas, where they were attacked by the Cheyenne and compelled to retrace their steps. They settled again at the month of Kansas River, where the Big Knives, as they called the whites, came with gifts and induced them to go farther west. The native narrators of this tradition give an account of about 20 villages occupied successively along Kansas River before the settlement at Council Grove, Kansas, whence they were finally removed to their reservation in Indian Territory. Marquette’s autograph map, drawn probably as early as 1674, places the Kansa a considerable distance directly west of the Osage and some distance south of the Omaha, indicating that they were then out Kansas River. The earliest recorded notice of the Kansa was by Juan de Oflate, who went from San Gabriel, N. Mexico, in 1601, till he met the “Escansaques,” who lived 100 leagues to the N. E., near the “Panana,” or Pawnee. It is known that...
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