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Mounted Volunteer Companies engaged in the Indian War

Mounted Volunteer Companies engaged in the Indian War, Mason’s administration. See: Washington Indian Wars, 1855-1856 for context of this list. Volunteer Companies Companies A, Capt. William Strong, and B, Capt. Gilmore Hays, were mustered into the regular service and furnished their own horses Company B, Capt. Isaac Hays Company F, Capt. B. S. Henness Company K, Capt. John R. Jackson Cowlitz Rangers, Capt. H. W. Peers Lewis River Rangers, Capt. William Bratton, in the service of the territory, furnished their own horses Stevens Guards. Capt. Higgins, were furnished horses by Gov. Spokane Invincibles, Capt. Yantis, horses partly furnished by Gov. and partly by volunteers Puget Sound Rangers, Capt. Charles Eaton, furnished their own horses Nez Perce Volunteers, Capt. Spotted Eagle, furnished their own horses and equipments. Inf. companies: Company C, George B. Goody Company D, Capt. W. H. Wallace (part of them mounted) Company G, Capt. W. A. S. McCorckle Company M, Capt. C. C. Hewitt Company I, Capt. I. N. Ebey Company J, Capt. A. A. Plummer Nisqually Ferry guards, Serg. Packwood Adj.-Gen. Rept, in Wash. Mess. Gov., 1857. See also Roder’s Bellingham Bay, MS.; Ebey’s Journal, MS.; Morris’ Wash. Ter., MS.; Ballou’s Adr.,515.; Hanford’s Ind. War, MS.; Yesler’s Wash. Ter., MS.; Parker’s Puget Sound, MS.,...

Indian Fight of the 7th, 8th, and 9th of December of 1858

Indian Fight of the 7th, 8th, and 9th of December of 1858. See: Washington Indian Wars, 1855-1856 for context of this list. Killed: Capt. Charles Bennett of Company F, the same who was connected with James Marshall in the discovery of gold in California 2d Lieut J. M. Burrows, Company H Simon S. Van Hagerman, Company I. Mortally wounded, who lived but a few hours: E. B. Kelsey, Company A Henry Crow and Casper Snook, Company H Joseph Sturdevant, Company B Jesse Flemming, Company A Dangerously wounded: Capt. Layton Privates T. J. Payne, Nathan Fry F. Crabtree, Company H J. B. Gervias, Company K. Severely wounded: Capt. A. V. Wilson, Company A Capt. L. Munson, Company I Ser.-Mag. Isaac Miller, Company H Private 0. W. Smith, Co. B Slightly wounded: Privates A. M. Addington, Company H Franklin Duval, Company A Evan., Oregon Military Organization, 90. On the 9th and 10th, wounded, A. Shepard Ira Allen John Smith Estimated Indians killed and wounded,...

Biography of William C. Painter

WILLIAM C. PAINTER. – William C. Painter was born in St. Genevieve county, Missouri, April 18, 1830. His parents, Philip and Jean, lived on a farm; and the early years of William’s life were passed in that home. In 1850 his father started for Oregon with his family of wife and seven children, but died of cholera on the Little blue river. Two of his sons had been buried as they camped by that stream two days before; and only the mother, with her two daughters, Margaret A. and Sara J., and three sons, William C., Joseph C. and Robert M. were left to continue their sorrowful journey to the Pacific coast. Upon the family’s arrival in the Willamette valley, they took up several Donation claims in Washington county; and the one taken by William was retained by him until his removal to Washington Territory in 1862. When the Indian war of 1855 broke out, he was one of those who enlisted for that campaign as a member of Company D, First Regiment, Oregon Mounted Volunteers, continuing to follow the fortunes of his company until it was mustered out of service late in 1856. It was the opportune arrival of this command upon the scene of action that caused the Indians at the battle of Walla Walla, in December, 1855, to give up the struggle and retreat into the Palouse country. He participated with credit to himself in all the battles and skirmishes of that war east of the Cascades, prior to the disbandment of his company. Mr. Painter was chosen by his comrades as the bearer of a...

Biography of G. W. Ozmont

G.W. OZMENT. – This gentleman is a veteran of the Indian wars, a survivor of many a bloody fight in Southern Oregon, and a pioneer of 1852. Born at Greensborough, North Carolina, in 1833, he became an orphan at the age of ten, and at fifteen went to Western Virginia with an uncle, and somewhat later was in Tennessee, working on his own account. The far West, however, was the land of his dreams; and he saved his earnings to go to Paducah, and from that point to St. Louis. Three months later he was on his way to St. Joseph by steamer. But ice in the river delayed progress at the Kansas river; and there he was glad to join the train of Mr. William McCown, who was on the way to Oregon. The journey, begun May 7, 1852, was favorable, meeting with only the usual hardships of the way until reaching the Cascade Mountains. There the train met with snow; and the teams were too much exhausted to draw the loaded wagons farther. Mr. McCown pushed on to Oregon City for help, leaving Mr. Ozment two weeks in the mountains to look after the goods. The first months of Oregon life were spent in Clackamas county erecting buildings for Mr. McCown, the winter with Mr. Case on Butte creek, and the following spring with Reverend A.F. Waller in Polk county. During the summer and second winter he was at the Belknap settlement in Benton county. In 1854 he moved to the Siuslaw, making his home with Mr. Cartwright, and was engaged by Moses Miliner in packing to...

Indian Battles For The Past Year and The Officers Engaged

Extract From The “General Orders.” Indian Battles For The Past Year and The Officers Engaged. General Orders NO. 22 Head Quarters of the Army, New York, Nov. 10, 1858 The following combats with hostile Indians in which the conduct of the troops, including volunteers and employees in the United States military service, is deserving of high praise for gallantry and hardships have occurred, or been brought to the notice of the General-in-Chief since the publication of General order. No. 14, of 1857, viz: XIV. September 1, 1858. The expedition under Colonel Wright, 9th infantry, composed of companies C, E, H and I, 1st dragoons; A, B, G, K and M, 3d artillery; and B and E, 9th infantry aggregate five hundred and seventy with a company of thirty Nez Percés Indians, marched from Fort Walla Walla, Oregon, on the 7th and 15th of August; crossed Snake River on the 25th and 26th; established a post at the crossing, which was left in charge of Brevet Major Wyse and his company D, 3d artillery; and, after a march of nearly a hundred miles, mostly over a forbidding country, during which they were twice attacked came upon a large body of united Spokan, Coeur d’Alene and Pelouse Indians, of which some four hundred were mounted. After securing his baggage and supplies, by leaving them under the guard of Company M, 3d artillery, with a mountain howitzer, and a detachment of fifty-four men, commanded by Lieutenants H. G. Gibson, G. B. Dandy and Lyon, the whole under Captain Hardie, 3d artillery. Colonel Wright moved with the rest of his force against the...

Battle of Spokane Plains Official Report

Official Report Of Colonel Wright Head Quarters, Expedition against Northern Indians, Camp on Spokan River W, T., 12 miles below the Falls. September 6, 1858. To Major W. Mackall, Assistant Adj’t. General TJ. S. Army: Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the battle of the Spokan Indians fought by the troops under my command on the 5th inst1 Our enemies were the Spokans, Coeur d’Alenes, Pelouses and Pend ‘Oreilles, numbering from five to seven hundred warriors. Leaving my camp at the “Four Lakes” at 6 A. M. on the 6th, our route lay along the margin of a lake for about three miles, and thence for two miles over a broken country thinly scattered with pines, when emerging on to the open prairie, the hostile Indians were discovered about three miles to our right and in advance, moving rapidly along the skirt of the woods, and apparently with a view of intercepting our line of march before we should reach the timbers. After halting and closing up our long pack train, I moved forward, and soon found that the Indians were setting fire to the grass at various points in front and on my right flank. Capt. Keyes was now directed to advance three of his companies, deployed as skirmishers, to the front and right. This order was promptly obeyed, and Capt. Ord with Company K, Lieut. Gibson with Company M, and Lieut. Tyler with Company A, 3d Artillery, were thrown forward. At the same time Capt. Hardie, Company G, 3d Artillery, was deployed to the left, and the howitzer under Lieut. White, supported by...

Battle of Four Lakes Official Report

Official Report Of Colonel Wright, After The Battle Of The “Four Lakes.” Head Quarters, Expedition against Northern Indians, Camp at “Four Lakes;’ W. T. Lat. 47″ 82 north. Long. 117” 89 west September 2d, 1858. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following Report of the battle of the “Four Lakes,” fought and won, by the troops under my command, on the 1st inst. Our enemies were the Spokan, Coeur d’Alene, and Pelouze Indians. Early in the morning of the 1st, I observed the Indians collecting on the summit of a high hill, about two miles distant, and I immediately ordered the troops under arms, with a view of driving the enemy from his position, and making a reconnaissance of the country in advance. At half past 9 A. M. I marched from my camp with two squadrons of the 1st dragoons, commanded by Brevet Major W. N. Grier, four companies of the third artillery, armed with rifle muskets, commanded by Capt. E. D. Keyes; and the rifle battalion of two companies of the 9th infantry, commanded by Capt. F. T. Dent; also one mountain howitzer, under command of Lieut. J. L. White, 3rd artillery, and thirty friendly Nez Percés Indian allies, under command of Lieut. John Mullan, 2nd artillery. I left in camp all the equipage and supplies, strongly guarded by company “M,” 3rd artillery, commanded by Lieuts. H. G. Gibson and G. B. Dandy, one mountain howitzer manned, and in addition a guard of fifty-four men under Lieut. H. B. Lyon, the whole commanded by Captain J. A. Hardie, the Field officer of the day. I...

Conclusions of the Pacific Indian War

The older officers regard the campaign we have just past through, as one remarkable in many respects. One is, the little loss which has been sustained. But two men have died, and those from eating poisonous roots. But one man has been wounded in action; and we have lost, by all the difficulties of marching through the forests and crossing rivers but three horses and about fifty mules. It is a proof of the skill and judgment with which the expedition has been conducted. For our freedom from loss in the two battles, I have already stated we are indebted to the fine discipline of the men, the skill of the commanders, and to the long range of our rifles. Had we been armed with the old muskets, the result might have been very different. The whole campaign, indeed, would undoubtedly have ended, as it now has done, in the humbling of the Indian tribes, but we should probably have missed many from our ranks, when the column marched back to Walla Walla. The object, too, was most thoroughly accomplished. The Indian tribes, hitherto so troublesome and defiant, have been entirely subjected. They have been taught the power of the government, their worst chiefs have been cut off and hostages given sufficient to keep them in obedience. Of their head men who are hostile, none remain but Kamiaken, and Schroom, his brother. The former is reported to have fled into the Blackfeet country, and the latter is probably with him. They will certainly have no disposition to place themselves again in collision with the whites. It is probable, too,...

Return to Fort Taylor

October 1st.The artillery battalion, one troop of dragoons, the commissary and quarter-master’s train, and the Indians and hostages under charge of Lieutenant Fleming, all under the command of Captain Keyes, left the camp on Pelouze River about six in the morning, and after marching eighteen miles, reached Snake River at noon and crossed over to Fort Taylor. We encamped on exactly the same ground we had occupied before the campaign. At the Fort, Major Wyse and Dr. Brown received us with the greatest hospitality. October 2d This morning we took leave, with many regrets, of Lieutenants Mullan and Owen. The former is under orders for Fort Vancouver, and the latter for Fort Dalles, to resume his duties as Adjutant of the Ninth Infantry. At noon. Colonel Wright, with the rest of the command, arrived at the river, and crossing over, encamped half a mile up the Tucanon. A salute was fired from Fort Taylor, in honor of Colonel Wright, as soon as he appeared on the opposite side. October 3rd. Orders had been received for us to remain on Snake River, and we supposed, therefore, that for the present we had finished our march. Early this morning, however, an express arrived rescinding the former orders, and making Fort Vancouver the place of our destination. The camp was therefore broken up, and we marched two miles and encamped on the Tucanon. In the afternoon Major Wyse joined us with his command, Fort Taylor having been abandoned by the troops. It was left in charge of an old Pelouze chief, named Slaviarchy. October 4th, Left camp at half-past six this morning....

Pelouze (Palouse) Council

September 26th. Left camp at half-past six this morning, and marched over a rolling, grazing country. By the side of a small cotton wood grove we saw the remains of thirty-four Indian lodges, probably deserted on the first advance of the troops into this country. Some of the lodge poles, from their magnitude, showed that the lodges must have been of considerable size. We marched fifteen miles and encamped on Silseepovestlem creek, where the water was good, but not plentiful. Today was the coldest we have had on our march. September 27th. We broke up camp between six and seven in the morning, and marched ten miles. The day was exceedingly cold, and it rained hard all the time. The men, however, bore it cheerfully, for their faces were homeward, and in a few days they expect to reach Fort Taylor. For a few miles our way lay through the open timber, by the side of a large lake. We camped on a small stream. September 28. Began our march at six o’clock this morning through a level, rocky country. We made about twenty-five miles during the day, finding water plentiful, our way, at one time, being along the banks of a lake. The grass for most of the distance of our route had been burned off. Through the whole day the weather was threatening, and before night the rain began pouring down. “We encamped on a tributary of the Pelouze, about two miles above its junction. Just before going into camp, we passed the grave of some distinguished Indian chief. It was large, covered with stones, and surrounded...
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