Norwich Vermont and Dartmouth College

Notwithstanding the fact that Norwich had for many years within its borders a collegiate institution of its own, founded and directed by its most distinguished son, the relations of their people towards Dartmouth College on the opposite bank of the Connecticut were always intimate and friendly.



Education, Schools and Language on the Six Nations Reservations

Thomas Orphan Asylum

The pagan element, as a general rule, is opposed to education. Exceptions are sometimes found. Families with small means, unwilling to make any effort to change their condition, claim that they need their children for homework. Even when they enter them at the beginning of the term, they do not enforce their attendance. The children,



Choctaw Nation Schools in 1904

This school had served the south Alabama Choctaws for one hundred years when it was photographed in 1935 by the Historic American Buildings Survey. (Courtesy of Library of Congress)

The following dataset is a list of students in the Choctaw Nation schools during the class year of 1904. It was compiled by Ruthie McLillan and provided to AccessGenealogy for publication. A day school curriculum included subjects such as English, math, history, drawing and composition. Students would often produce a variety of weekly and monthly



Schools by County

Gaine School Boiling Spring School Teacher: Robert E. Lee (fullblood Choctaw) Local Trustee: Jackson James (fullblood Choctaw) Dunlap School Teacher: E.P. Sullivan (white) Local Trustee: Lum Dunlap (intermarried white) Featherston School Teacher: May Featherston (white) Local Trustee: L.C. Featherston (intermarried white) Mountain Station School Teacher: H.J. Sexton (fullblood Choctaw) Local Trustee: Houston Nelson (fullblood Choctaw)



School Duties

The plat of ground inclosed by our buildings was rectangular, the sides of which were one hundred feet in length. In the center of this square a post or column was firmly planted, upon the upper end of which a bell was hung. In the winter season the bell was rung at five o’clock, and



Opening of the Fort Coffee Academy

On the ninth day of February, 1844, the school opened with six students from the Pushmataha district; they presented certificates of appointment signed by J. Folsom, chief, and S. Jones, Trustee. On the following day a number of pupils came from the Puckchenubbee district with certificates signed by James Fletcher, chief, and P. P. Pitchlynn,



Fort Coffee Academy for Boys

On the first day of October, 1844, the second session of the Academy opened with about thirty students in attendance, a few not having yet returned. Mr. Brigham was employed as an assistant teacher. He was an Irishman, having been born and educated in the city of Dublin, and was, by profession, a druggist. His



New School System

It will be remembered that at the session of the General conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the month of May, 1840, four Secretaries, or agents, were appointed to serve under the direction of the Missionary Board of our Church, Rev. E. R. Ames was appointed to the western portion of the work. The



Gum Springs Indian School, Mississippi

A transcription of Gum Springs Indian School in Mississippi in 1916, taken by John T. Reeves, Special Supervisor, Indian Service.



Calcutta Indian School, Neshoba County, Mississippi

A transcription of Calcutta Indian School in Neshoba County, Mississippi in 1916, taken by John T. Reeves, Special Supervisor, Indian Service.



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