Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that the records of a New England town should be printed and presented to the governments of Europe, to the English nation as a thank-offering and as a certificate of the progress of the Saxon race; to the continental nations as a lesson of humanity and love. De Tocqueville said that the government of a New England township was the best specimen of a pure democracy that the world has ever seen. The town charters granted by New Hampshire conferred upon the inhabitants of each township, from its first organization, the right of self-government in town meeting, by the election of town officers and general ejection of town affairs. Such, also, had long been the practice in Connecticut, from whence a large proportion of all the early settlers had immigrated to their new homes in the New Hampshire Grants. The royal decision of July 20, 1764, which extended the boundary of New York to the west bank of the Connecticut River, soon resulted in the practical relinquishment by New Hampshire...

Autauga County Alabama Officials 1819-1870

James Jackson represented the county in the constitutional convention of 1819; George Rives, sr., in that of 1861; and Benjamin Fitzpatrick in that of 1865, over which he presided. The following is a list of the members of the general assembly from the county 1819-Howell Rose. 1822-Dunklin Sullivan. 1825-James Jackson. 1828-William R. Pickett. 1831-William R. Pickett. 1834-Robert Broadnax. 1837-Samuel S. Simmons. 1841-Dixon Hall. 1843-William t. Yancey. Senators. 1844-Sampson W. Harris. 1847-Seth P. Storrs. 1849–Seth P. Storrs. 1853-Thomas H. Watts. 1855 -Adam C. Felder. 1857-Adam C. Felder. 1861—Samuel F. Rice. 1865–Adam C. Felder. [No election in 1867 or since,] Representatives. 1819-P. Fitzpatrick, C. A, Dennis. 1820-Phillips Fitzpatrick, J. Jackson. 1821-W. R. Pickett, Jno. A. Elmore. 1822-Phillips Fitzpatrick. 1823-William R. Pickett. 1824-William R. Pickett. 1825-Robert Broaduax, John McNeil. 1826-Robert Broadnax, Eli Terry. 1827-Robert Broadnax, Eli Terry, 1828-Robert Broadnax, Rogers. 1829-Robert Broadnax, Wm. Hester. 1830-R. Broadnax, Dixon Hall, sr. 1831-Robert Broadnax, Dixon Hall. 1832-R. Broadnax, S. S. Simmons. 1833-Dixon Hall. jr., S. S. Simmons. 1834-W. Burt, S. S. Simmons, J. B. Robinson. 1835-Dixon Hall, jr., S. S. Simmons, Bejamin Davis. 1836-John P. Dejarnette, S. S. Simmons, Benjamin Davis, 1837-John P. Dejarnette, Wm. Burt, T. W. Brevard. 1838-Dixon Hall, jr., J. W. Withers, Thomas Hogg. 1839-Dixon Hall, John Withers. 1840-Benj. Davis, Absolom Doster. 1841-John Steele, Wm. L. Morgan. 1842-John Mitchell, Wm. L. Morgan. 1843-J. Steele, Crawford M. Jackson. 1844-John Steele, C. M. Jackson. 1845-John Steele, C. M. Jackson. 1847-John Wood, C. M. Jackson. 1849-John Wood, Bolling Hall. 1851-C. C. Howard, Bolling Hall. 1853- Bolling Hall. 1855-Crawford M. Jackson . 1857-Crawford M. Jackson. 1859-A. C. Taylor. 1860-Daniel Pratt, (to fill vacancy.) 1861-Daniel Pratt. 1863-L....

The Hudson River

The Hudson River has played a prominent roll in the history of the State of New York and America. This collection of writings documents a writers sojourn along the Hudson River as he explains in poignant language the features, locations, history and tales of the Hudson River.

From Hudson to Albany along the Hudson River

Directly opposite Hudson, and connected with it by ferry, is the classically named village of Athens. An old Mahican settlement known as Potick was located a little back from the river. We are now in the midst of the great Ice Industry “Ice Industry,” which reaches from below Staatsburgh to Castleton and Albany, well described by John Burroughs in his article on the Hudson: “No man sows, yet many men reap a harvest from the Hudson. Not the least important is the ice harvest, which is eagerly looked for, and counted upon by hundreds, yes, thousands of laboring men along its course. Ice or no ice sometimes means bread or no bread to scores of families, and it means added or diminished comforts to many more. It is a crop that takes two or three weeks of rugged winter weather to grow, and, if the water is very roily or brackish, even longer. It is seldom worked till it presents seven or eight inches of clear water ice. Men go out from time to time and examine it, as the farmer goes out and examines his grain or grass, to see when it will do to cut. If there comes a deep fall of snow the ice is ‘pricked’ so as to let the water up through and form snow ice. A band of fifteen or twenty men, about a yard apart, each armed with a chisel-bar, and marching in line, puncture the ice at each step, with a single sharp thrust. To and fro they go, leaving a belt behind them that presently becomes saturated with water. But...

Narrative of Lewis Solomon

Lewis Solomon was the youngest son of William Solomon,1 who was born in the closing years of the last century, of Jewish and Indian extraction. This William Solomon lived for a time in Montreal, but entered the service of the North-West Company and drifted to the “Sault’, and Mackinaw. Having become expert in the use of the Indian tongue, he was engaged by the British Government as Indian interpreter at the latter post during the War of 1812. During his sojourn at Mackinaw he married a half-breed woman named Miss Johnston,2 the union resulting in a family of ten children, of whom, at the first writing of these notes, Lewis was the sole survivor, but joined the majority March 9th, 1900. Lewis very humorously claimed that in his person no less than five nationalities are represented, though he fails to tell us how. As the Indian nature appeared to predominate, and since his father was partly German, his mother must have been of very mixed nationality. When the British forces were transferred to Drummond Island, Interpreter Solomon and his family accompanied them thither; and later, when it was decided that Drummond Island was in U.S. territory, he followed the British forces to Penetanguishene in 1828, where he subsequently died, and where he and his wife and the majority of his family lie buried. It was the fond hope of the family that Louie would succeed his father in the Government service as Indian interpreter. In pursuance of this plan, his father sent him to a French school at L’Assomption;3 to the Indian schools at Cobourg and Cornwall; also, for...

Great Osage Village of Kansas – White Hair

The one village of the Great Osages on the Neosho mentioned by Colonel Sibley was that of White Hair. It was established about the year 1815, as noted before. In 1796 when the Arkansas band was induced to settle on the Lower Verdigris by Chouteau a trail from these Lower Towns to the old home on the Little Osages, in Vernon County, Missouri, where Pike had found the Osage Nation, was marked, and thenceforth used by traders and Indians alike. This trail followed up the Marmaton, in what is now Bourbon County, Kansas. It crossed over to the waters of the Neosho near the southeast corner of the present Allen County, bearing all the time to the southwest. The Neosho River was reached and crossed just above the present town of Shaw, in Neosho County, Kansas. In migrating to the Neosho River, White Hair and his band followed this old trail. The Great Osage town was fixed at the crossing of the Neosho, and on the west side of the river. When the Government survey of Kansas was made the site of White Hair’s village fell within the bounds of section sixteen (16), township twenty-eight (28) range nineteen (19).1 The missionaries came down from their establishments in the old Osage country to proclaim the Gospel to Osages on the Neosho. The Presbyterians set up a mission there as early as 1824, with Rev. Benson Pixley in charge. What this effort accomplished is not fully known. In March, 1830, Rev. Nathaniel B. Dodge, was sent from Independence, Mo., where he had gone after strenuous labors at Harmony Mission, to take up...

A Short History of Michilimakinak

No more colorful settlement existed in the Middle West than the mission and fort at the Straits of Mackinac, for the French early realized its importance and directed their westward explorations from this base. The concentration point for the fur trade of the Middle West, Mackinac held an important place for many years, both during the British and American regimes.

Miscellaneous Notes In The Mackinac Registers

In the original Mackinac Register these are scattered through the register, in the neighborhood of entries on other subjects. They are here brought together under one head. July 22, 1787,1 after invoking the enlightenment of the Holy Ghost, we, the undersigned, elected by a majority of votes, as church wardens of the church of Ste. Anne de Michilimakina, messieurs Ch. Chaboillé2 and Daniel Bourassa, who formally promised and undertook to care for the interests of the Said Church as their own and on their soul and conscience. In testimony whereof they have signed with us. Payet, missionary priest. Chles Chaboillez; Dl. Bourassa; Bte. Guillory;3 Marchenau; J. B. Barth; L. Carignan; Pr. Grignon; Etne Campion; Jean Beeves; G. Cotte;4 Laurent Ducharme; P. Thierry; Al Laframboise; Bte. Tabeau; P. Tabeaux.+ Note—In the Notarial Register of Monsieur Adhemar, page 164, 13th August 1788, is an Acknowledgment by Charley Chaboiller, residing at fort St Joseph, or the new fort, for the sum of sixty livres belonging to the church of Ste Anne de Mikili Makina. Gabriel Richard, missionary priest. 1813, 4 February.5 This day, the 5th of the month of August 1821, the Inhabitants of the Parish of Ste Anne du Michilimakinac, assembled in the usuel manner, appointed as Church-wardens of this Parish, to remain in office until a new nomination: Mr. William McGulpine, Mr Eloy Bourassa6 and Mr Joseph Rollet. They were specially instructed to take care of the movable property of the Parish consisting chiefly of Church linen, vestments, &c &c. and to take an inventory of the same. In testimony whereof we have signed Gabriel Richard, parish priest of Ste...

The English In Georgia

We have shown that South Carolina had been established as a colony for some years, that its seat of government was at Charleston, and that its inhabitants, in endeavoring to extend the English trade to all the Western Indian nations as far as the Mississippi river, had many conflicts and difficulties with the French, who occupied the territory of Alabama. They were also constantly opposed by the Spaniards of the Floridas. In order to interpose a barrier to these foes, as well as to protect the citizens from the attacks of the Creek Indians, the King of England and the British Parliament listened to a proposition of a great philanthropist, to plant a colony upon the western bank of the Savannah river. His motives, purely noble and disinterested, originated in a desire to ameliorate the condition of many unfortunate people in England. To carry out his plans of humanity, he was willing that the King should blend with them politic measures for the advancement of this, his most Southern province, and it was determined that “silk, wine and oil should be cultivated most abundantly.” James Oglethorpe, a descendant of one of the oldest and most influential families of England, was born on the 22d of December 1688, and after graduating at Oxford University, was commissioned an ensign in the British army. In 1713, he accompanied the Earl of Petersburg, then Ambassador to the Italian States, in the capacity of aide-de-camp. Returning to England, a year afterwards, he was promoted to a captaincy in the first troop of Queen Anne’s Guard, and was soon an adjutant- general of the Queen’s...

Terrible Massacre at Fort Mims

In the meantime, the wealthy half-bloods about Little river had dropped down the Alabama, in their boats, and had secreted themselves in the swamp about Lake Tensaw. Uniting with the whites, they soon began the construction of a fort around the residence of Samuel Mims, a wealthy Indian countryman, to whom we have often alluded, and who, originally, was one of the pack-horsemen of the Honorable George Galphin. Being about to relate a horrible affair, in which people of all ages and both sexes were subjected to savage butchery, a particular description of the place where it occurred is deemed necessary. Mims lived within four hundred yards of the Boat Yard, upon Lake Tensaw, a mile east of the Alabama River, and two miles below the Cut-Off. His house was a large frame building of one story, with spacious shed-rooms. Around it pickets were driven, between which fence rails were placed. Five hundred portholes were made, three and a half feet only from the ground. The stockading enclosed an acre of ground, in a square form, and was entered by two ponderous but rude gates, one on the east and the other on the west. Within the enclosure, besides the main building, were various out-houses, rows of bee gums, together with cabins and board shelters, recently erected by the settlers, wherever a vacant spot appeared. At the southwest corner a blockhouse was begun, but never finished. This defense was situated on a very slight elevation. A large potato field lay adjoining on the south, in which were a row of Negro houses. Woods intervened between the picketing and the...
Page 7 of 295« First...3456789101112...2030...Last »

Pin It on Pinterest