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Early Explorations of Louisiana Territory

From the mouth of the Verdigris, in its day the farthest thrust of the pioneer, the conquest of a large part of the Southwest was achieved. The story of this campaign covering a period of nearly fifty years, has never been written, though it contains much of romance that even in the form of isolated or related incidents, it is possible to record. The Louisiana Purchase itself was romance. In 1803 President Jefferson directed Monroe and Livingston to negotiate for the purchase of New Orleans for the United States, and they brought home title to an empire, practically a donation from France.

Contributions of the Lowell Massachusetts Historical Society

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 2 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were preceded by the contributions by the Old Residents Historical Association of Lowell, Massachusetts. Table of Contents Volume I Bunker Hill, The Battle of, and Those Who Participated Therein from the Towns from which Lowell was Formed, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Fiske, Rev. John, by Henry S. Perham Francis, Mrs. Sarah W., by Miss Mabel Hill Lincoln, Abraham, Centennial Anniversary of Introductory Address, Solon W. Stevens Recollections of Lincoln in Lowell in 1848, Samuel P. Hadley Recollections of the Assassination of Lincoln, William M. Clarke Reminiscences of Personal Interviews with Lincoln, Moses G. Parker Lowell High School Historical Essays, 1906 “The Lowell High School, Its History, and the History Its Boys and Girls have Made.” Presentation of Prizes, Alfred P. Sawyer First Prize Essay, Alfred M. Caddell Second Prize Essay, Harold P. Conklin 1907 “The Concord River in History and Literature.” Introduction First Prize Essay, Miss Edith C. Erskine Second Prize Essay, Miss Annie Louise Naylor 1909 “Lowell the Site for a Beautiful City.” First Prize Essay, Miss Tessie G. Curry Second Prize Essay, Miss Geneva AT. Coggins Manning, Manse, The, Mrs. Louise C. Howard Marisquelles, Col. Marie Louis Amand Ansart De, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Middlesex County, Ancient and Modern, Levi S. Gould With brief biographical sketches of the men who have served as county commissioners from Lowell and adjacent towns. Middlesex Village, Boyhood Reminiscences of, Samuel P. Hadley Mining Operations near Lowell, Early, Alfred P. Sawyer Old Homes...

Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving and the Lowell Manufacturing Company, by Samuel Fay Dana, Samuel L., Memoir of, by John O. Green Early Recollections of an Old Resident, by Josiah B. French East Chelmsford (now Lowell), Families Living in, in 1802, by Z. E. Stone Green, Benjamin, Biography of, by Lewis Green Hale, Moses, Early Manufacturer of Wool, &c., in E. Chelmsford, by Alfred Gilman History of an Old Firm, by Charles Hovey Jackson, General, in Lowell, by Z. E. Stone Jackson, Patrick T., by John A. Lowell Knapp, Daniel, Autobiography of Letters (Three) of Samuel Batchelder First Census of Lowell; the Hamilton Manufacturing Company; first Manufacture of the Power-Loom Drilling Letters (Three) of Samuel Lawrence John Brown; Milton D. Whipple; the Purchase of the Outlets of the N. H. Lakes, the sources of the Merrimack Lewis, Joel, Reminiscences of, by Joshua Merrill Livingston, William, by Josiah B. French Locke, Joseph, Life and Character of, by John A. Knowles Lowell and Harvard College, by John O. Green Contains a list of alumni and graduates of Harvard University, now or formerly residing in Lowell. July 1877. Lowell and the Monadnocks, by Ephraim Brown Lowell and Newburyport, by Thomas B. Lawson Lowell, Francis Cabot, by Alfred Gilman Lowell Institution for Savings, Semi-Centennial History of, by Geo. J. Carney Lowell, Mayors of...

Dedham Massachusetts Historical Society Register 1890-1903

From 1890-1903, the Dedham Historical Society in Dedham Massachusetts printed a quarterly pamphlet for it’s historical society called the “Dedham Historical Register.” In this pamphlet a variety of genealogical data was published on families of Dedham and the villages emanating from the early residents of Dedham, such as Dorchester, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Needham, and Sharon, etc.

Utilla Past and Present

The picturesque island of Utilla is the most south-westerly of the group known as the Bay Islands. The islands are six in number. They are Ruatan, Bonacco, Utilla, Helene, Barburat and Morat; and are situated in the Bay of Honduras an arm of the Caribbean Sea. Bonacco, the most easterly of the group, was discovered by Columbus on his fourth voyage in 1502. Taken together these islands form a flourishing Department in the Republic of Honduras. In 1858 the population of Utilla was 101 souls. It now (1904) numbers nearly 800 inhabitants. And for many years past the island has been a theater of action, in a small way, through the efforts and energies of its thrifty people who arc striving and aspiring toward a higher state of existence. Utilla is rich in fanciful names. Some one not very long ago christened it “A Lazy Man’s Paradise.” It seems that some people’s idea or vision of earthly bliss is to be in a place where one may live a dreamy and inactive life only smoking a pipe and swinging in a hammock and so be as happy as the day is long. And this beatific condition, it is thought by the dreamers, can be realized only in some delightful spot in the tropics. Nature is truly very generous in these parts, and the fertile soil frequently rewards the planter by yielding the full “hundred fold.” Nevertheless here as elsewhere the law remains fixed: “In the sweat of thy face,” and the rest. Historians have informed us that the Bay Islands were thickly populated at the time of their discovery....

Recollections of the Tide Mills

The tide mills, the first of which was built in 1765, when at its raising every person in town was present and all sat about one table at dinner, was the first mill of the town, and was named “Endeavor”. The father and grandfather of the writer were owners in the mills, and has worked in them in boyhood, and has many recollections of them. His earliest is of the time when he was three years of age and accompanied his father to the mills dressed in petticoats, and with his hands clasping his lunch of bread and butter. The father was engaged in making repairs to “the nigger wheel”1, and had taken up a plank of the mill flooring the better to get at the work. He had occasion to get some tools in the grist mill near at hand, so he sat his boy down away from the hole in the floor and told him to be sure and sit there till he came back. Hardly had he disappeared from sight before an uncontrollable desire seized the writer to look down through that hole in the floor. So he crawled along until he reached the spot and looking down saw the water beneath, then lost his balance and pitched headlong through the hole into the waters below. He rose to the surface lying upon his back floating lightly and holding his hand up to protect his bread and butter. The tide was ebbing, carrying him slowly seaward, but he was unconcerned and examined the floor timbers of the mill and thought them strange appearing. Just then his...

Sir William Johnson and the Six Nations

The Mohawk Valley in which Sir William Johnson spent his adult life (1738-17 74) was the fairest portion of the domain of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. In this valley William Griffis had lived nine years, seeing on every side traces or monuments of the industry, humanity, and powerful personality of its most famous resident in colonial days. From the quaint stone church in Schenectady which Sir Johnson built, and in whose canopied pews he sat, daily before his eyes, to the autograph papers in possession of his neighbors; from sites close at hand and traditionally associated with the lord of Johnson Hall, to the historical relics which multiply at Johnstown, Canajoharie, and westward, — mementos of the baronet were never lacking. His two baronial halls still stand near the Mohawk. Local traditions, while in the main generous to Johnson’s memory, was sometimes unfair and even cruel. The hatreds engendered by the partisan features of the Revolution, and the just detestation of the savage atrocities of Tories and red allies led by Johnson’s son and son-in-law, had done injustice to the great man himself. Yet base and baseless tradition was in no whit more unjust than the sectional opinions and hostile gossip of the New England militia which historians have so freely transferred to their pages.

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