Elahsa

Elahsa (‘village of the great willows’). A former Hidatsa village on the north bank of Knife River, North Dakota, about 3 miles from Missouri River. Alternate Spellings: Biddahtsi-Awatiss – Maxmillian, Voy. dans l’int de l’Am. III, 3, 1843. Eláh-sá – Maxmillian, Trav., 178, 1843. Hidatsa – Matthews, Ethnog. Hidatsa, 38, 1877.



Aucocisco

The name of the territory about Casco Bay and Presumpscot River, in the area now included in Cumberland County, Maine. It was also sometimes applied to those Abnaki Indians by whom it was occupied. Since the section was settled at an early date by the whites, the name soon dropped out of use as applied



Kosotshe

Kosotshe. A former village of the Tututni, identified by Dorsey with the Luckkarso nation of Lewis and Clark, who placed them on the Oregon coast south of the Kusan territory in 1805, and estimated their population at 1,200.  Fifty years later Kautz said their village was on Flores Creek, Oregon. Dorsey fixed their habitat north



Guacata

Wakata Town Plan

Guacata – An inland Calusa village on Lake “Mayaimi” or Okechobee, south Florida, about 1570. Elsewhere in his memoir Fontaneda refers to it as a distinct but subordinate tribe.1 Guacata, Cuacata – In one place Fontaneda speaks of this as a town on Lake Mayaimi (Okeechobee) and elsewhere as one of the provinces of the



Incha Tribe

Incha. An unidentified tribe said to have lived where there were Spanish settlements and to have been at war with the Mantons (Mento) of Arkansas River in 1700.1 Alternate Spellings: Icca – Iberville (1702) in Margry, Déc., IV, 561, 1880. Incha – Ibid., 599.   FootnotesHodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. ↩



Itomapa Tribe

Itomapa. Mentioned by Martin1 as a tribe, on the west side of the lower Mississippi, which sent a deputation to the village of the Acolapissa in 1717 to meet Bienville. Consult: Ibitoupa Tribe FootnotesHist. La., i, 252, 1820 ↩



Inchi

Inchi (In′tci, ‘stone lodge’). A village occupied by the Kansa in their migration up Kansas River. J. O. Dorsey, inf’n, 1882.1 FootnotesHodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. ↩



Imaha

Imaha – A Quapaw village mentioned by La Metairie in 1682 and by Iberville in 1699, and visited by La Harpe in 1719. It was situated on a south west branch of Arkansas River. In the wars and contentions of the 18th and 19th centuries some of the Quapaw tribe fled from their more northerly



Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements of Virginia

These pages will provide an alphabetical listing for all the villages, towns, and settlements in what was the state of Virginia at the time the Handbook of American Indian of North America was written. Acconoc to Aureuapeugh Bulltown Cantaunkack to Cuttatawomen Dogi Gangasco Hassinunga  



Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements of Wisconsin

These pages will provide an alphabetical listing for all the villages, towns, and settlements in what was the state of Wisconsin at the time the Handbook of American Indian of North America was written. Calumet. A former Menominee village on the east shore of Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin, with 150 inhabitants in 1817. Starrow in Wis.



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