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North American Indians of the Plains

North American Indians of the Plains discusses the original content of the Hall of Plains Indians – American Museum of Natural History. This collection provides an extensive review of the houses, clothing, food, hunting, religion, language and other ethnological studies of the Plains Indians. Replete with maps and many photographs.

Life Among the Choctaw Indians

Henry Benson worked as a missionary amongst the Choctaw at the Fort Coffee Academy for Boys in the mid 1800’s. In this manuscript he depicts the formation of the Academy and missionary amongst the Indians, providing valuable insight into the tribal customs of the Choctaw after they had been forcibly moved to the Indian Territory. He also provides glimpses into the lives of westerners before the Civil War in the south-west.

The Mound Builders

The Historical and Scientific Society of Manitoba published several papers by Dr. Bryce in description of visits among the remains of the Mound Builders of the Canadian West. This particular one contains information on the excavation of Great Mound, Rainy River, Aug. 22, 1884. Ours are the only mounds making up a distinct mound-region on Canadian soil. This comes to us as a part of the large inheritance which we who have migrated to Manitoba receive. No longer cribbed, cabined, and confined, we have in this our “greater Canada” a far wider range of study than in the fringe along the Canadian lakes. Who Built the Mounds? Mound Varieties at Takawgamis Natural Products from the Rainy River Mounds Manufactured Articles of Rainy River Mounds Who Were The Mound Builders? The Earliest Mound of Rainy River...

The Indian Tribes of North America

Swanton’s The Indian Tribes of North America is a classic example of early 20th Century Native American ethnological research. Published in 1953 in Bulletin 145 of the Bureau of American Ethnology, this manuscript covers all known Indian tribes, at the time, broken down by location (state). AccessGenealogy’s online presentation provides state pages by which the user is then either provided a brief history of the tribe, or is referred to a more in-depth ethnological representation of the tribe and it’s place in history. This ethnology usually contains the various names by which the tribe was known, general locations of the tribe, village names, brief history, population statistics for the tribe, and then connections in which the tribe is noted.

Choctaw Artifacts

Comparatively few articles are now made by the Choctaw, much of their ancient art having been forgotten. At the present time they purchase the necessary tools and implements at the stores, and other objects are no longer used. The list which follows is believed to include all things of native origin now made by the Choctaw at Bayou Lacomb (1900): Wood Artifacts Mortars and pestles Scrapers, two forms of, used in preparing skins Drum Ball club Blowgun and darts Canoes Leather Artifacts Straps for carrying baskets. Narrow strips used on the ball clubs. Untanned skins used for the heads of drums. Long strips of tanned deer skin used as lashes for whips by the drivers of ox teams employed in the lumber industry. Stone Artifacts Arrowheads Chisels Jewelry Knifes Pieces of chert or jasper are sometimes used with a steel to “strike fire.” Pottery Pipes Horn Spoons Baskets Pack Basket Elbow Shaped Basket Pointed Basket Cords Ropes...

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