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Land Amended January 23, 1903

Exhibit B The following described land in the list of land filed with the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes December 10, 1902, and amended January 23, 1903, by Walter S. Logon, claiming to be the attorney of the Delaware Indians, is found, as indicated below, from the Commission’s records to be claimed or occupied by Cherokee citizens, as per Commission’s citizenship cards, and who are not Delaware, or listed as such upon citizenship cards of the Commission. NOTE: After you find your ancestor listed on this page, you should take the the Card Number, and go to the Final Roll Database and search there. Township 22 North, Range 14 East, Indian Meridian Card No Section Surname Given Name Middle Acres Cher 4709 Section 6 Halsell Edward L. 481.78 Cher 4709 Section 7 Halsell Edward L. 130.44 Cher 560 Section 32 Edwards William S. 20.00 Township 23 North, Range 14 East, Indian Meridian Cher 4872 Section 4 Roscopf James 20.00 Cher 9634 Section 34 Scidmore Otis S. 30.00 Cher 6542 Section 35 Powell Frank 90.00 Cher 6542 Section 35 Powell Frank 220.00 Township 25 North, Range 14 East, Indian Meridian Cher 9593 Section 8 Greenwood John P. 160.00 Cher 3821 Section 16 Bluejacket William F. 80.00 Cher 4572 Section 16 Wallace William B. 90.00 Cher 9755 Section 16 McNabb Sanford 30.00 Cher D-44 Freedman Section 29 Thompson Blue 40.00 Cher D-859 Freedman Section 29 Daniels Andrew 60.00 Township 26 North, Range 14 East, Indian Meridian Cher 9782 Section 15 Austin Zula 30.00 Cher 9782 Section 16 Austin Zula 10.00 Township 27 North, Range 14 East, Indian Meridian Cher 4263...

Allotment of Lands to Delaware Indians

December 31, 1903 The following described land of the Cherokee Nation is hereby segregated as the Delaware segregation of said nation, in accordance with section 23 of the Cherokee agreement (Public—No. 241), approved by the President July 1, 1902, and ratified by the Cherokee Nation August 7, 1902; and this list is in substitution or amendment of any other list or lists which have heretofore been considered by the Commission in connection with said Delaware segregation. Lead selected and occupied by living registered Delaware. NOTE: After you find your ancestor listed on this page, make a note of the Card Number, and go to the Final Roll Database and search there. Put OS (Old Settler or Old Series) in front of the Card Number and search. No. Card No. Register No Surname Given Name Middle Name Total Acres 1 105 974 Adams, Horace M. 160.00 2 101 975 Adams, Richard C. 156.85 3 140 720 Ager, Mary 160.00 4 218 416 Allen, Mary 160.00 5 171 470 Anderson, Daniel 160.00 6 64  426 Anderson, Rachel 160.00 7 277 876  Armstrong, Albert F. 160.00 8 301 929   Armstrong, Annie E. 157.00 9 76 10 Armstrong, Arthur 160.00 10 158 408 Armstrong, Catherine A. 60.00 11 301 874 Armstrong, Henry 160.00 12 102 404 Armstrong, Mary E. 158.52 13 270 602 Armstrong, Solomon F. 50.02 14 138  151 Arnold, Harry 160.00 15 49 977   Barber, Carrie 160.00 16 63 428 Barker, Lizzie W. 160.00 17 135 677  Baseomb Mary 160.00 18 148 480 Beaver, Eliza 160.00 19 247 521  Beaver, Elizabeth 160.00 20 308 601 Bezion, Mary C. 160.00 21 108...

Land in Adam and Logon list which has been claimed by Cherokee citizens

Exhibit A Land in Adam and Logon list which has been claimed by Cherokee citizens other than Delaware, as shown by attempts to file thereon. Where land has been claimed by more than one Cherokee only the original claim is shown on this list. NOTE: After you find your ancestor listed on this page, you should take the the Card Number, and go to the Final Roll Database and search there. No Card No Surname Given Name Middle Name Total Acres 1 Cher 17 Thompson Milton K. 230.00 2 Cher 7033 Blackstone Robert D. 210.00 3 Cher 9585 Colston Sterling 330.00 4 Cher 5432 Byrd Jane 60.00 5 Cher 5458 Waller Goldie J. 30.00 6 Cher 5458 Waller William T.H. 30.00 7 Cher 5458 Waller George W. 10.00 8 Cher 584 Atkins Andrew C. 40.00 9 Cher 346 Bryant Benjamin F. 20.00 10 Cher 346 Bryant Leona 20.00 11 Cher 4235 Jordan Isaac H. 10.00 12 Cher 7012 Blackstone Pleasant N. 80.00 13 Cher 4294 Morrison Robert T. Jr. 50.00 14 Cher 4294 Morrison Ellen C. 80.00 15 Cher 4294 Morrison Claud A. 10.00 16 Cher 1013 Bradford Tessie 73.84 17 Cher 1013 Bradford Jennetta 80.00 18 Cher 1013 Bradford Malissa 80.00 19 Cher 1013 Bradford Deatrus 80.00 20 Cher 4230 Lannom Harold D 40.00 21 Cher 5424 Rogers Ruth E. 40.00 22 Cher 5424 Rogers Maud E. 40.00 23 Cher 5473 Byrd Henry H. 50.00 24 Cher 4278 Daniels Lucy 40.00 25 Cher 746 Lord Amos W. 80.00 26 Cher 6878 Foreman Samuel S. 40.00 27 Cher 6878 Foreman Minnie O. 19.91 28 C.R. 19 Tidwell Alice 80.00...

Biography of Francis Alexander Neilson

Francis A. Neilson was born in Oxford, Mississippi, June 2, 1860, eighth child in a family of twelve of W. S. Neilson, a prominent merchant of Oxford, and before the war a very wealthy man. Francis A. received his education at the State University, leaving his sophomore year at the age of twenty-one, after which he began a mercantile life as book-keeper in a large general merchandise store in Oxford, and remained in this occupation for three years. In 1885 the subject of our sketch went West to Arkansas City, Kansas, and there formed a partnership in the hardware business, but this becoming uncongenial Mr. Neilson went to Bartholsville, Indian Territory, and entered the employment of J. H. Bartles, as book-keeper, and remained three years. In March 1888, he was married to Ella May Pratt, stepdaughter to J. H. Bartles, and immediately moved to Claremore, where he engaged in the mercantile business, which he still continues successfully. Mrs. Neilson’s father was Lucius B. Pratt, eldest son of Rev. John G. Pratt, of an old Boston family, and many years agent to the Delawares. Her mother was Miss Nannie May “Journey Cake,” daughter of Rev. Charles J. Journey Cake, present chief of the Delawares. Mrs. Neilson is a highly educated lady, and is accomplished and refined above the average of her sex. By this marriage Mr. Neilson has two children, Nonie, born March 12, 1889, and Ada May, born May 8, 1891. Mr. Neilson’s mother was a Miss Mary C. Bowen, of East Tennessee, and a member of a very wealthy and aristocratic family. Mr. Neilson has, in addition to...

Biography of John L. Bullette

John L. Bullette was born April 10, 1852, in Wyandotte County, Kansas, third son of George Bullette and Eliza Connor. His father was of French descent and his mother of Irish descent, both possessing Indian blood. His grandparents on both sides intermarried into the Delaware tribe. In 1859 John L. attended the Baptist Mission School in Wyandotte County, where he remained until 1861, when the war broke out, and he removed with his people to the Cherokee Nation. This move was agreeable to a contract made between both tribes, wherein the Delawares purchased a right and title to the lands and funds of the Cherokees, placing themselves on an equal footing with the latter. John L. commenced farming on a small scale, and for about four years employed his time clerking at various points, until 1875, when he accepted a permanent position with J. H. Bartles, a general merchant of Bartlesville, where he continued for four years as chief clerk in the establishment. After parting on amicable terms with his employer, John L. commenced buying and shipping cattle on a small scale, and followed the business until 1880, when he engaged in the mercantile line on his own responsibility at Claremore. In the same year he married Miss Nellie Conkle, daughter of Captain Conkle, of steamboat fame. In 1881 he was nominated and elected clerk of Coowescowee district for two years, and became deputy clerk in 1883 under his successor. In 1885 he sold out his interest in merchandise, and accepted the position of executive secretary under Chief Mayes, which office he holds at the present date (November, 1891)....

Treaty of September 17, 1818

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties, with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Shawnese, and Ottawas, tribes of Indians; being supplementary to the treaty made and concluded with the said tribes, and the Delaware, Potawatamie, and Chippewa tribes of Indians, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen. Article 1. It is agreed, between the United States and the parties hereunto, that the several tracts of land, described in the treaty to which this is supplementary, and agreed thereby to be granted by the United States to the chiefs of the respective tribes named therein, for the use of the individuals of the said tribes, and also the tract described in the twentieth article of the said treaty, shall not be thus granted, but shall be excepted from the cession made by the said tribes to the United States, reserved for the use of the said Indians, and held by them in the same manner as Indian reservations have been heretofore held. But [it] is further agreed, that the tracts thus reserved shall...

Treaty of September 29, 1817

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians on the one part; and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawanese, Potawatomees, Ottawas, and Chippeway tribes of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby forever cede to the United States the lands comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point on the southern shore of lake Erie, where the present Indian boundary line intersects the same, between the mouth of Sandusky bay and the mouth of Portage river; thence, running south with said line, to the line established in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, by the treaty of Greenville, which runs from the crossing place above fort Lawrence to Loramie’s store; thence, westerly, with the last mentioned line, to the eastern line of the reserve at Loramie’s store; thence, with the lines of said reserve, north and west, to the northwestern corner thereof; thence to the northwestern corner of the reserve on the river St. Mary’s, at the head of the navigable waters thereof; thence, east, to the western bank...

Treaty of January 21, 1785

Articles of a treaty concluded at Fort M’Intosh, the twenty-first day of January, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, between the Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part, and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wyandot, Delaware, Chippawa and Ottawa Nations of the other. The Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States in Congress assembled, give peace to the Wyandot, Delaware, Chippewa and Ottawa nations of Indians, on the following conditions: Article 1. Three chiefs, one from among the Wyandot, and two from among the Delaware nations, shall be delivered up to the Commissioners of the United States, to be by them retained till all the prisoners, white and black, taken by the said nations, or any of them, shall be restored. Article 2. The said Indian nations do acknowledge themselves and all their tribes to be under the protection of the United States and of no other sovereign whatsoever. Article 3. The boundary line between the United States and the Wyandot and Delaware nations, shall begin at the mouth of the river Cayahoga, and run thence up the said river to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of Meskingum; then down the said branch to the forks at the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; then westerly to the portage of the Big Miami, which runs into the Ohio, at the mouth of which branch the fort stood which was taken by the French in one thousand seven hundred and fifty-two; then along the said portage to the Great Miami or Ome River, and down the south-east side of the same to its...

Treaty of January 9, 1789

Articles of a Treaty Made at Fort Harmar, between Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the Territory of the United States North- West of the River Ohio, and Commissioner Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, for removing all Causes of Controversy, regulating Trade, and settling Boundaries, with the Indian Nations in the Northern Department, of the one Part; and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Pattawatima and Sac Nations, on the other Part. Article 1. Whereas the United States in Congress assembled, did, by their Commissioners George Rogers Clark, Richard Butler, and Arthur Lee, Esquires, duly appointed for that purpose, at a treaty holden with the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa nations, at Fort M’Intosh, on the twenty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, conclude a peace with the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa, and take them into their friendship and protection: And whereas at the said treaty it was stipulated that all prisoners that had been made by those nations, or either of them, should be delivered up to the United States. And whereas the said nations have now agreed to and with the aforesaid Arthur St. Clair, to renew and confirm all the engagements they had made with the United States of America, at the before mentioned treaty, except so far as are altered by these presents. And there are now in the possession of some individuals of these nations, certain prisoners, who have been taken by others not in peace with the said United States, or in violation of the treaties subsisting between...

Treaty of August 3, 1795

A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia. To put an end to a destructive war, to settle all controversies, and to restore harmony and a friendly intercourse between the said United States, and Indian tribes; Anthony Wayne, major-general, commanding the army of the United States, and sole commissioner for the good purposes above-mentioned, and the said tribes of Indians, by their Sachems, chiefs, and warriors, met together at Greeneville, the head quarters of the said army, have agreed on the following articles, which, when ratified by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on them and the said Indian tribes. Article 1. Henceforth all hostilities shall cease; peace is hereby established, and shall be perpetual; and a friendly intercourse shall take place, between the said United States and Indian tribes. Article 2. All prisoners shall on both sides be restored. The Indians, prisoners to the United States, shall be immediately set at liberty. The people of the United States, still remaining prisoners among the Indians, shall be delivered up in ninety days from the date hereof, to the general or commanding officer at Greeneville, Fort Wayne or Fort Defiance; and ten chiefs of the said tribes shall remain at Greeneville as hostages, until the delivery of the prisoners shall be effected. Article 3. The general boundary line between the lands of the United States, and the lands of the said Indian tribes, shall begin at...
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