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Pulaski County, Georgia Clerks Of Inferior Court

Clerks of Inferior Court for Pulaski County, Georgia from the years 1809-1866. John Rainey, May 4, 1809 David Gertman, Nov. 2, 1809 Joseph Wood, Oct. 29, 1811 Washington Lancaster, Jan. 9, 1816 Robert Moreland, Jan. 13, 1818 Robert Moreland, Jan. 11, 1820 Joshua R. Wimberly, Jan. 29, 1822 G. B. Gardner , Jan. 14, 1824 (Deceased) Westly Yarbrough, Feb. 9, 1825 Westly Yarbrough, Jan. 17, 1826 Joseph Carruthers, April 29, 1829 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 12, 1830-Jan. 11, 1832 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 11, 1832-Jan. 14, 1834 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 14, 1834-Jan. 16, 1836 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 16, 1836 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 15, 1838 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 10, 1840 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 20, 1842 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 8, 1844 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 13, 1846-Jan. 22, 1848 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 22, 1848 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 12, 1850-Jan. 14, 1852 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 14, 1852-Jan. 11, 1854 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 11, 1854 Batts N. Mitchell, Dec. 20, 1854-Jan. 11, 1856 Batts N. Mitchell, Jan. 11, 1856-Jan. 12, 1858 Batts N. Mitchell, Jan. 12, 1858-Jan. 10, 1860 Edmund A. Pollock, Jan. 10, 1860 A. M. Fraser, Jan. 24, 1862-Feb. 16, 1864 A. M. Fraser, Feb. 16, 1864-Jan. 22, 1866 B. N. Mitchell, Jan. 22, 1866-Oct. 22, 1866 Edward A. Burch, Oct. 25,...

Pulaski County, Georgia Clerks of the Superior Court – 1809 – 1936

Clerks of Superior Court from Pulaski County, Georgia for the years of 1809-1936. Richard H. Thomas, May 4, 1809 Richard H. Thomas, Nov. 2, 1809 Richard Thomas, Oct. 29, 1811 Turner Everett, Feb. 1814 Edward Smith, Jan. 9, 1816 Gray B. Gardner, Jan. 13, 1818 Gray B. Gardner, Jan. 11, 1820 Gray B. Gardner, Jan. 29, 1822 G. B. Gardner, Jan.14, 1824 (Deceased) Westly Yarbrough, Feb. 9, 1825 Westly Yarbrough, Jan. 17, 1826 Joseph Carruthers, Feb. 29, 1829 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 12, 1830-Jan. 11, 1832 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 11, 1832-Jan. 14, 1834 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 14, 1834-Jan. 16, 1836 Joseph Carruthers, Jan. 16, 1836 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 15, 1838 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 10, 1840 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 20, 1842 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 8, 1844 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 13, 1846-Jan. 22, 1848 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 22, 1848 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 12, 1850-Jan. 14, 1852 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 14, 1852 Jan. 11, 1854 John V. Mitchell, Jan. 11, 1854 Batts N. Mitchell, Dec. 20, 1854-Jan. 11, 1856 Batts N. Mitchell, Jan. 11, 1856-Jan. 12, 1858 Batts N. Mitchell, Jan. 12, 1858-Jan. 10, 1860 Edmund A. Pollock, Jan. 10, 1860 A. M. Fraser, Jan. 24, 1862-Feb. 16, 1864 A. M. Fraser, Feb. 16, 1864-Jan. 22, 1866 B. N. Mitchell, Jan. 22, 1866-Oct. 22, 1866 Edward A. Burch, Oct. 25, 1866 Edward A. Burch, Sept. 14, 1868 Edward A. Burch, Feb. 7, 1871 Edward A. Burch, Jan. 10, 1873 Edward A. Burch, Jan. 13, 1875 Edward A. Burch, Jan. 27, 1877 Edward A. Burch, Jan. 15, 1879 Edward A. Burch, Jan. 13, 1881 J. W....

Trial Record and Legal Papers – Jasper Newton Bee

These are the kind of records you may obtain when you order Fort Smith Criminal Records. October 23, 1882 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, WESTERN DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS. THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, To The Marshal of the Western District of Arkansas, GREETING: WHEREAS, Complaint on oath hath been made before me, charging that Jasper N. Bee did, on or about the 23 day of Oct A.D. 1882, in the Indian Country, Western District of Arkansas Assault to kill one Moore a White man. Contrary to the form of the statute in such cases made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the United States. Now, Therefore, you are hereby commanded, in the name of the President of the United States of America, to apprehend the said Jasper N. Bee and bring his body forthwith before me, E. B. Harrison, commissioner appointed by the United States District Court for said District, whenever he may be found, that he may be then and there dealt with according to law for said offense. Given under my hand this 24 day of Oct 1882, in the 107 year of our independence. E. B. Harrison Commissioner U.S. Dist. Court, West, Dist. Ark. October 24, 1882 OFFICE U.S. MARSHAL UNITED STATES Western District of Arkansas versus Jasper N. Bee I certify that I served the within Writ of Arrest on the 26 Day of October, 1882, at the N.W. Siloum B Sprint 6 miles Cherokee Nation by then and there taking into my CAPIAS custody the within named Issued Oct 24 1882 Jasper N. Bee RETURNABLE FORTHWITH. E. B. Harrison Comm. Whose...

Status of the Courts Prior to Territorial Government

The book was brought to Oregon in 1843; it was called the “blue book,” and was bound in blue boards. On the 27th of June, 1844, the Legislative Committee adopted an Act “Regulating the Executive Power, the Judiciary and for Other Purposes,” of which Art. III, Sec. 1, was as follows: “Sec. 1. All the Statute Laws of Iowa Territory passed at the first session of the Legislative Assembly of said Territory and not of a local character, and not incompatible with the condition and circumstances of the country shall be the law of the government, unless otherwise modified; and the Common Law of England and principles of equity, not modified by the Statutes of Iowa or of this government and not incompatible with its principles, shall constitute a part of the law of the land.” After the Organic Law had been remodeled in 1845, and the Legislature convened in August of that year, it was deemed advisable to re-enact the Iowa Laws, lest any doubt of their binding force under the new provisional government be entertained, and accordingly a bill for that purpose was passed, August 12, 1845.1 At this time there was no printing press in Oregon, and though many laws were enacted it is not to be presumed that they were very widely promulgated, and perhaps the maxim that ignorance of the law excuses no one, would, under the circumstances, prove severe application.2 But, again, on the organization of the Territory in 1849, under the laws of the United States, the same question as to how far these statutes were the law of the Territory, was raised,...

The Holladay Cases

The most remarkable litigation, however, is the series of cases known as the Holladay cases. Ben Holladay, whose name appears more than once in these pages, was the prince of borrowers, and among other creditors for large sums, was his brother Joseph. The two men were as unlike in appearance and character as though they were of different ancestors; Ben being a high liver, a spend-thrift, a man of gigantic schemes and boundless ambition, who scattered his own money and the money of every one on which he could lay hands broadcast in support of his extravagant habits and his numerous projects; Joseph, on the other hand, made money by saving it and accumulating interest. He had no projects, no enterprises, no ambitions. He was crafty, stubborn and full of prejudices. As early as 1873, Ben began to make conveyances of property in Oregon to Joe to secure him for money borrowed from time to time, and in 1876, when Ben removed from Oregon to Washington City, Joe, by assignments of stock and deeds of real estate absolute upon their face, but which were intended as mortgages, had title to all that Ben possessed. Ben came back from Washington in 1884 and demanded his property from Joe, professing to be ready to pay his claim. Joe then set up a claim that he was the real owner of the property; that the conveyances to him were absolute, and not intended as mortgages.. Ben began suit to have the conveyances declared mortgages, and to redeem the property. The litigation lasted three years, and the result was that the conveyances were...

Georgia Courthouse Disasters

This is a survey of Georgia Counties in which some sort of natural disaster (and man made in some cases) may have affected the county record repositories. You will notice that many of these dates correspond with years in the civil war as the Union soldiers made it a point to burn the county courthouse and all its property records which would include slave records. This survey does NOT imply that all records were lost. Researchers should consult both the Archives and the courthouse to determine what records survive. County Fire Flood Storm Baker 1925, 1929 Baldwin 1861 Bartow 1864 Bulloch 1864 Burke 1825, 1856 Butts 1828 Calhoun 1888, 1920 Carroll 1927 Charlton 1877, 1928 Cherokee 1865,1928 Clayton 1864 Clinch 1856, 1867 Cobb 1864 Coffee 1898, 1938 Colquitt 1881 Crawford 1829 Dade 1865, 1895 DeKalb 1842, 1898 Dooly 1847 Douglas 1896, 1957 Early 1896 Echols 1897 Emanuel 1841, 1855, 1857, 1919, 1938 Fayette ca. 1982 Forsyth 1900, 1905, 1973 Glynn ca. 1906 1896 Gordon 1888 Grady 1980 Greene 1787 Gwinnett 1871 Habersham 1856, 1898 Hall 1851, 1882 1936 Harris 1865 Hart 1900, 1967 Heard 1893 Henry 1864 (?) Jenkins 1919 (?) Lee 1856, 1872 Lowndes 1858, 1869 Macon 1857 Marion 1845 McIntosh 1864, 1872, 1931 Meriwether 1976 1893 Miller 1873, 1974 Mitchell 1869 Morgan 1917 (?) Muscogee 1838 Newton 1883 Pickens 1945 Pierce 1875 Polk 1846 Quitman 1920 Screven 1860’s, 1896 Spalding 1981 Stewart 1922 Talbot 1890 Telfair early 1900’s Thomas 1849 Toombs ca. 1919 Troup 1936 Twiggs 1901 Union 1859 Walker 1883 Ware 1854 Warren 1909 Washington 1855, 1864 Webster 1914 Wheeler 1916 Whitfield 1864 Wilcox ca. 1902...

Todd County, Kentucky Courts and Bar

Under the Constitution of 1799, there were three inferior courts, the Circuit Court, the County Court and the single Magistrate. The first was the same as at present, though in the scarcity of lawyers, the fashion was to travel the circuit, the Judge leading and the bar following as escort. Hopkinsville, Elkton, Russellville and Greenville were the principal points to which the practice of the time led the leading lawyers of the Todd County bar. The County Court was the great local arbiter of county interests, and was composed of a “competent number” of justices appointed from the county at large, and commissioned by the Governor of the State for good behavior. It was provided by law, however, that the Justice of the Peace longest in commission became ex ipso facto the Sheriff at the first vacancy. The official term of this officer was two years, so that at the expiration of this period the Justice of the Peace was once more relegated to the position of a sovereign.” The membership of the court was maintained by further appointments, which, while it was not actually for the term of good behavior, would in the natural order of things continue, after the first appointees were exhausted, some twenty-five years. As a matter of fact very few of the magistrates served as Sheriff; preferring to ” farm out the office,” as the phrase went. There were always those who were willing to pay from $800 to $1,000 for the position of deputy and the business and emoluments of the office, and this arrangement was almost invariably effected. Under the Constitution of...
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