Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Chimakum Tribe

Chimakum Indians. A Chimakuan tribe, now probably extinct, formerly occupying the peninsula between Hood’s canal and Port Townsend, Washington. Little is known of their history except that they were at constant war with the Clallam and other Salish neighbors, and by reason of their inferiority in numbers suffered extremely at their hands. In 1855, according to Gibbs, they were reduced to 90 individuals. The Chimakum were included in the Point no Point treaty of 1855 and placed upon the Skokomish Reservation, since which time they have gradually diminished in numbers. In 1890 Boas was able to learn of only three individuals who spoke the language, and even those but imperfectly. He obtained a small vocabulary and a few grammatical notes, published in part in Am. Anthrop., V, 37-44,...

Quileute Tribe

Quileute Indians. A Chimakuan tribe, now the only representative of the linguistic stock, whose main seat is at Lapush, at the mouth of Quillaynte river, about 35 miles south of Cape Flattery, west coast of Washington. A small division of the tribe, the Hoh live at the mouth of the river of the same name, 15 miles south of Lapush. Since they have been known to the whites the Quileute have always been few in number, but being of an independent and warlike disposition and occupying an easily defended situation, they have successfully resisted all the attempts of neighboring tribes to dislodge them. Their most active enemies have been the Makah, of Neah bay, and until they came under the control of the United States petty warfare between the two tribes was constant. The Quileute are noted for their skill in pelagic sealing and are the most successful in that pursuit of all the tribes of the coast. They are also daring whalers, but have not attained the proficiency of the Makah. Salmon are caught in considerable numbers and constitute an important article of food. Roots and berries of various kinds are also much used. Although the woods in their vicinity abound with deer, elk, and bear, the Quilteute seem to have hunted them but little and have confined themselves to a seafaring life. There is evidence that a clan system of some sort formerly existed among them, but is now broken down. Their customs as well as their mythology indicate a possible connection with the tribes of Vancouver island. The Quileute, together with the Quinaielt, by treaty at...

Pin It on Pinterest