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Autobiography of Black Hawk or Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiak

Embracing The Traditions Of His Nation, Various Wars In Which He Has Been Engaged, And His Account Of The Cause And General History Of The Black Hawk War Of 1832, His Surrender, and Travels Through the United States. The changes of fortune and vicissitudes of war made you my conqueror. When my last resources were exhausted, my warriors worn down with long and toilsome marches, we yielded, and I became your prisoner. The story of my life is told in the following pages: it is intimately connected, and in some measure, identified, with a part of the history of your own: I have, therefore, dedicated it to you. The changes of many summers have brought old age upon me, and I can not expect to survive many moons. Before I set out on my journey to the land of my fathers, I have determined to give my motives and reasons for my former hostilities to the whites, and to vindicate my character from misrepresentation. The kindness I received from you whilst a prisoner of war assures me that you will vouch for the facts contained in my narrative, so far as they came under your observation. I am now an obscure member of a nation that formerly honored and respected my opinions. The pathway to glory is rough, and many gloomy hours obscure it. May the Great Spirit shed light on yours, and that you may never experience the humility that the power of the American government has reduced me to, is the wish of him, who, in his native forests, was once as proud and bold as yourself....

Black Hawk Indian Wars

Early in April, 1832, Brig. General Atkinson, with about three hundred troops, was ordered to Fort Armstrong to prevent a threatened war between the Menominee and Fox Indians, on account of a massacre, committed by a band of the latter on a small band of drunken Menominee the previous summer at a point near Fort Crawford. To prevent bloodshed he was directed to demand the murderers of the Foxes; but on arriving at Rock Island he soon learned that there was imminent danger of a war of a different character–that Black Hawk, with his entire band, was then on his way to invade the State of Illinois and would probably be joined by the Pottawatomie and Winnebago. In order to ascertain the facts in the case, he called upon the Indian Agent and Col. George Davenport, both located here, and requested them to furnish, in writing, all the information they had in relation to the movements and intentions of Black Hawk in coming to the State of Illinois. 1832 Autobiography of Black Hawk or Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiak Blackhawk Indian War William Clark And The Black Hawk War (hosted at American History and Genealogy Project) Ogle County Battle Of Stillman’s Run Sac and Fox Indians Indian Wars Illinois Illinois Black Hawk War Veterans (hosted at State of Illinois) Illinois Military Units Adams County Capt. William G. Flood’s Co. Captain David Crow’s Co. Captain William C. Ralls’ Co. Alexander County Capt. Henry L. Webb’s Company Bond County Capt. Benjamin James’ Co. Captain B. James’ Co. Brown County Capt. Nathan Winters’ Co. Bureau County Captain George B.Willis’ (or Wills’) Co. Cass County Capt. Thomas...

Biography of Ira F. M. Butler

IRA F.M. BUTLER. – The honesty and wholeheartedness of a certain, and indeed, predominating, class of our early settlers is nowhere better exemplified than in Mr. Butler. Seventy-seven years of age, but still vigorous and kindly, adhering firmly to the temperance principles which have prevented the dissipation of his native course, and while well-to-do, indeed wealthy, spending much of his means in benevolent works, he is a striking example of the noble old gentleman. He was born in Barren county, Kentucky, in 1812, and was the son of Major Peter Butler, distinguished in the war of 1812. In 1829 the family moved to Illinois. Young Butler grew up on a farm in the region since designated as Warren county, remaining with his father until the outbreak of the Black Hawk war. He heard the call raised at that time to save the early settlements, and enlisting served until the Indians were quieted. The experience thus obtained served to open for him the position of deputy sheriff. In 1835 he was married to Miss Mary A. Davidson, who for more than fifty years was his devoted wife, and bore him eight children. Soon afterwards he was elected sheriff, and four years later was appointed by Stephen A. Douglas as clerk of the circuit court, filling that office seven years. In 1853 he sold his farm and closed out all his business, with the intention of crossing the plains, and became captain of a train bound for Oregon. By August 9th his company had passed all the mountains, and had gained the limits of Polk county. On the lovely plain about...

Biography of Hon. John Bird

HON. JOHN BIRD. – This venerable pioneer of our state comes from that stock of state-makers and town-builders who have ever been at the front. He was born in 1810 in Boone county, Kentucky, and lived there with his father until the year 1827, thereafter making Illinois his home until 1847. In the latter year he joined the train of Captain Sawyer, and set forth for Oregon, starting from Missouri about the 1st of May. Upon the trip nothing was more notable than the appearance of about one hundred Pawnee Indians, who laid a blanket on the ground for the emigrants as they passed to drop in a contribution of flour, and the shooting with arrows of two valuable horses by the same Indians. The toils, adventures and exertions, of vast interest and importance, were of the same character as of the early thousands who made the long journey. Crossing the Cascade Mountains by the Barlow Road the 1st of October, Mr. Bird passed his first winter in our state at Linn City, opposite Oregon City, and indeed made this point his home until 1849. In that memorable year of gold he went to the California mines, but did not “strike it rich,” and after deliberation decided that the better place to make a fortune was in the rich valleys of Oregon. Returning therefore to our state he selected a location adjoining Lafayette, buying a place located before by Judge Skinner and Mr. Rice. He made this opulent farm his home up to the year 1864, since which time he has resided in Lafayette. Having been a veteran of...

Biography of Col. Cornelius Gilliam

COL. CORNELIUS GILLIAM. – Colonel Gilliam was a native of North Carolina, and was born in 1798. But his recollection of that state in after years was like a dream; for when but a youth he accompanied his parents to Missouri, where he lived for many years. August 31, 1820, he married Miss Mary Crawford of that state. Ten years later he was elected sheriff of Clay county for a term of two years; and at the expiration of that time he joined the Black Hawk war. In 1837 he served as captain of the company which fought all through the Seminole war. About this time trouble arose with the Mormons. The authorities decided to expel them from the state; and for that purpose volunteer were called for. Captain Gilliam came to the front, raised a company and was chosen its captain. He was soon after promoted to a colonelcy for meritorious conduct. In 1843 he represented Andrew county in the legislature. Religiously he was a free-will Baptist. In 1845 he was ordained to the ministry; and the next year he left for Oregon, arriving in the fall. He first settled in Polk county, but soon removed to Benton county, there remaining until his departure in 1847 to join the then marshaling forces for the Cayuse war; for the Indians threatened death and destruction on every hand. The people were in mortal dread and terror, both for their lives and their property; for many depredations had been committed by the Indians; and in several instances coldblooded, outright murder and atrocious massacres of whole families had occurred. The life and...
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