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Biography of Honorable Daniel Buck

Daniel Buck came to Norwich in 1784 or ’85, and opened the first lawyer’s office in town, on the hill near the old center meeting house, then just being completed and there continued to live and transact business for twenty-five years, or until he removed to Chelsea in 1809. Norwich then contained probably about one thousand inhabitants, but no village, there being at that time not over three or four dwellings where Norwich village now stands. But little is known of Mr. Buck previous to his coming to Norwich. He was born at Hebron, Conn., November 9, 1753, and was the second son and child of Thomas and Jane Buck of that town. He had been a soldier in the Revolution, and had lost an arm at the battle of Bennington. He had also lived some time in Thetford, which was settled largely by people from Hebron, and perhaps also in Hanover, N. H. He acted as secretary to the council in June, 1785, when the Vermont legislature assembled at Norwich, having been assistant secretary of the same body during their session at Rutland the preceding October. He seems to have been a householder at Norwich at this time, as by a resolution of the council on June 17, the treasurer of the State was directed “to pay Daniel Buck twenty shillings hard money for the use of his house, etc.” For several years the young attorney does not appear to have made much headway in his profession, the townspeople sharing in the ancient dislike to lawyers so prevalent in the early days of New England. The town records...

Biographical Sketch of Crispus Attucks

Attucks, Crispus, An Indian-negro half-blood of Framingham, Mass., near Boston, noted as the leader and first person slain in the Boston massacre of Mar. 5, 1770, the first hostile encounter between the Americans and the British troops, and therefore regarded by historians as the opening fight of the great Revolutionary struggle. In consequence of the resistance of the people of Boston to the enforcement of the recent tax laws a detachment of British troops had been stationed in the town, to the great irritation of the citizens. On Mar. 5 this feeling culminated in an attack on the troops in front of the old State House, by a crowd made up largely of sailors, and said to have been led by Attucks, although this assertion has been denied by some. The troops retaliated by firing into the party, killing four men, of whom Attucks was the first to fall. A monument to his memory was erected in Boston Common by the commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1888. Although the facts in regard to his personality are disputed, the evidence goes to show that Attucks was a sailor, almost a giant in stature, the son of a negro father and all Indian mother of Framingham, or the neighboring village of Natick, formerly the principal Indian mission settlement of Massachusetts. The name Attucks, derived from his mother, appears to be the Natick (Massachuset) ahtuk, or attuks, ‘small deer.’ See G. Bancroft, Hist. U. S.; Appleton’s Encyclop. Am. Biog.; Am. Hist. Rec., I, Nov....

Biography of George Bartholomew Cook

George Bartholomew Cook, who has been engaged in the operation of the ranch on which he now resides in the Wallowa valley for nearly thirty years, is one of the well known pioneers in the vicinity of Lostine. He was born in Polk County, Oregon, on the 27th of February 1862, and is the son of Thomas L. and Harriet (Jacobs) Cook. The parents came to the Willamette valley in 1854 and there the father engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1879 when together with his family he removed to Wallowa County. Here he passed away the same year, but the mother survived until 1909. The Boyhood and early youth of George Bartholomew Cook were passed on the ranch where he was born, and in the cultivation of which he began to assist at a very early age. He was given the advantages of but a meager education, such schooling as he acquired being obtained in the Willamette valley when he was a lad of between and sixteen years. He accompanied his parents on their removal to Wallowa County in 1879 and here he filed on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres upon attaining his majority, and has ever since devoted his energies to its cultivation. During the intervening years he has effected marvelous changes in his place, which is located two miles south of Lostine, and now owns one of the best improved and equipped ranches in the community. Mr. Cook is an industrious man of practical ideas and has applied himself intelligently to the development of his land, which has rewarded his efforts by abundant harvests...

Biography of William La Fayette McCubbin

William La Fayette McCubbin, a well known ranchman of Wallowa county, where he has resided for more than twenty years, was born in Washington county, Oregon, on the 11th of January, 1869, and is a son of John B. and Martha J. (Yarber) McCubbin. The father passed away in 1880, but the mother is still living. William LaFayette McCubbin was only a lad of eleven years at the time of the death of his father. He was reared at Wapinitia, this state, where he attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education until he was sixteen. Feeling that he had a sufficient knowledge to enable him to become self-supporting, he then left school and engaged in the stock-business in that vicinity. In 1900 he removed from Wasco to Wallowa County,. He then withdrew from this and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits in the vicinity of Lostine and this has ever since engaged his entire time and attention. Progressive and enterprising in his methods, Mr. McCubbin has applies himself intelligently to his vocation and is considered an efficient ranchman. On the 20th of October, 1898, Mr. McCubbin completed his arrangements for a home of his own by his marriage to Miss Maude I. Masterson, a daughter of William and Anna Masterson of Lostine, Oregon, and they have become the parents of three children, Bernice, Cecil and Everett, all of whom are attending school. Mr. McCubbin is one of the active and enthusiastic members of the Farmers Union. His views of in matters politic accord with the principles of the Republican Party for whose men and measures he...

Biography of Crawford Wallace Womack

C. W. (Crawford Wallace) Womack, who lives retired at Lostine, Oregon, is one of the pioneer settlers of Wallowa valley. He was born in Shelby County, Illinois, on October 4, 1844, the son of William and Martha A. (Jordan) Womack, both of whom were natives of Tennessee. The parents were married in Illinois, where they had removed in youth with their parent’s. After their marriage they resided for a short time in Shelby County and then removed to Lee County, Iowa, and later to Putnam County, Missouri. In 1866 they came to Oregon, locating near Lostine, Oregon in Wallowa County, where they purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. Later they moved into the town of Lostine, where they both passed away, the father, October 15, 1901, at the age of eighty-four years, and the mother February 9, 1901, at the age of eighty-three. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The father belonged to the Masonic lodge, having joined that order in the early ‘60s. C. W. Womack was reared under the parental roof and acquired his education in the common schools, attending an old time log schoolhouse, with its split logs for benches and its puncheon floor. In 1863, at the age of nineteen, he went with the gold seekers to Pike’s Peak, in Colorado, where he spent the summer, returning that winter to his home in Missouri. In the spring of 1864 he started across the plains for Oregon, making his way with ox teams in a wagon train of about eighty-three wagons. He was six months on the road, between the Missouri...

Illustrations, Famous American Belles

Emily Marshall (Mrs. William Foster Otis). From portrait painted by Chester Harding in 1830; owned by her daughter, Mrs. Samuel Eliot, of Boston, by whose permission it is here reproduced for the first time in colors. Marcia Burns (Mrs. John Peter Van Ness). From miniature by James Peale, painted in 1797; owned by the Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, D. C 12 Theodosia Burr (Mrs. Joseph Alston). From the original engraving by Charles B. J. F. Saint Memin; owned by Hampton L. Carson, Esq., of Philadelphia, by whose permission it is here reproduced. Elizabeth Patterson (Madame Jerome Bonaparte). From portrait painted by Quinçon; owned by her grandson, Mr. Charles Bonaparte, of Baltimore, by whose permission it is here reproduced for the first time. Mary Caton (Lady Wellesley). From portrait owned by Mrs. Charles Carroll Mactavish, of Baltimore, daughter of General Winfield Scott. Painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence, and reproduced by permission of Miss Emily Mactavish, now Sister Mary Agnes of the Visitation, at Mount de Sales, Catonsville, Maryland. Cora Livingston (Mrs. Thomas Pennant Barton). From a miniature painted by herself. Reproduced for the first time by permission of her niece. Miss Julia Barton Hunt, of Montgomery Place, Barrytown-on-the-Hudson. Octavia Walton (Madame LeVert). From portrait, reproduced by permission of her kinswoman, Miss Josephine Walton. Present owner, Mr. George Walton Reab, of Augusta, Georgia, grandson of Madame Le Vert. Fanny Taylor (Mrs. Thomas Harding Ellis). From portrait painted by Thomas Sully, Reproduced for the first time by permission of her husband, Colonel Thomas Harding Ellis. Present owner, her adopted son, Mr. Beverly Randolph Harrison, of Amherst, Virginia. Sally Chevalier (Mrs. Abram Warwick)....

Mary Victoria Leiter, Baroness Curzon of Kedleston

For the second time within the century an American woman has risen to viceregal honors. Mary Caton, the granddaughter of Charles Carroll of Carrollton and the widow of Robert Patterson, of Baltimore, through her marriage, in 1825, to the Marquis of Wellesley, who was at the time Viceroy of Ireland, went to reign a queen in the country whence her ancestors, more than a century before, had emigrated to America. In Mary Victoria Leiter, whose life, to the people of a future generation, will read much like romance, we again behold an American woman, who, like the Marchioness of Wellesley at the time she became Vicereine of Ireland, is still young and beautiful, filling a similar position in India, with its four hundred millions of subjects. The parallel between her life and that of Mary Caton, however, goes no farther. Wellesley was already in possession of the Governor-Generalship of Ireland when he married Mrs. Patterson. He was, moreover, beyond the threescore mark in years, and he bore “his blushing honors thick upon him,” having already been Viceroy of India. Curzon was but thirty-nine years old when the governor-generalship of the latter mighty country, the shining mark of many a man’s whole career, was offered to him. His public life bore little more than “the tender leaves of hope,” though his writings on Eastern topics were already accepted as highly authoritative. Lady Wellesley had but to follow the leadership of a man of recognized ability and established fame, while Lady Curzon walks side by side with the man who is making that steep ascent which the British editorial mind has...

Nellie Hazeltine, Mrs. Frederick W. Paramore

Among the members of the graduating class at Mary Institute, St. Louis, in the year 1873, was a young girl who, in addition to the bright mind and intellectual ambition she had already manifested, was endowed with so extraordinary a physical beauty and so lovable a character that much of the brilliancy of her life might even then have been foretold. She was not yet seventeen years old, and was as absolutely unconscious of the unusual loveliness of her person as she ever seemed to be even after ten years of adulation. Her figure had already attained a faultless contour, and in her simple graduation gown of white French muslin, the flounces of its skirt headed with wreaths of pink roses and green leaves, and its round bodice offset with a bertha covered in the same design of roses and leaves, she suggested all the fragrance and beauty of a flower. Her red gold hair seemed to reflect some of the sun’s own glory, and with the marvelous delicacy of her skin, the deep wine color of her eyes, and the classic perfection of her features, there can be little doubt that she was, as she was so often said to be later, the most beautiful woman ever born west of the Mississippi. Among her schoolmates Nellie Hazeltine had won that popularity that was hers in after years to so remarkable an extent among all women. The power she possessed of diffusing herself and all that pertained to her among others precluded every thought of envy, and those with whom she came in contact experienced rather a sense of...

Jennie Jerome, Lady Randolph Churchill

Today, when there are so many American women adorning high places and filling more or less leading roles in British society, it is difficult to realize that only a little more than a quarter of a century ago there was a strong movement afoot, among certain leaders of that society, to exclude their fair transatlantic cousins from London drawing rooms. As to the oft-recurring Anglo-American marriage, while there are yet many people who look askance upon any sort of an international alliance, that prejudice that frowned so ominously upon it some years ago has wonderfully abated on both sides of the water. The Queen herself recently confessed that she had regarded it at one time as rather a hazardous experiment, but realizing that, with her broad education and elastic temperament, the American girl adapts herself to a new environment with a facility which would scarcely be possible to the less flexible English girl, Her Majesty’s apprehensions have been gradually allayed. One of the first American women before whom these later day barriers of social prejudice gave way was Miss Jennie Jerome, of New York. As the wife of Lord Randolph Churchill, and ably championed by his mother the Duchess of Marlborough, she penetrated the innermost recesses of British society, opening the way more than any other woman to the position her countrywomen occupy there at the end of the century, and holding herself a place second to that of no other American woman in Europe. The admiration she attracted as a young girl, the wonderful part she played in the life of her husband and is at present playing...

Mattie Ould, Mrs. Oliver Schoolcraft

In the vicinity of one of Richmond’s fashionable schools there was often seen on winter afternoons, in the late sixties, a group of young girls, who possessed far more than the usual attractiveness that belongs ever to health and youth. Two, at least, Lizzie Cabell and Mary Triplett, were singularly beautiful. The third, a tall, slender girl, with a trim figure, dark skin and hair, and eyes perhaps downcast as she stepped lightly along listening to her companions, a stranger would scarcely have observed. If, perchance, however, as they paused on a street corner for a last word before separating, the downcast eyes were lifted, there gazed from out their soft depths a spirit that transformed the entire face. They were truly the windows of a soul, looking out upon the world with a frankness that was irresistible, and with a certain caressing fondness for life that begot a kindred glow in all it looked upon. In her sweet voice there was the same tone of caress as it gave a parting utterance to some flashing thought to which, likely as not, she paid the tribute of that honest smile, whose witchery still lingers in many minds. As she continued her walk homeward many lifted hats greeted her passing, many eyes followed her, and her name was murmured among many groups, for, young as she was, Mattie Ould was already wandering in the pathway of a fame that was to make her later the idol of the people of the South. Before she was beyond the tutelage of her old mammy the piquancy of her wit had established her...
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