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Biography of Thomas Sawyer, Jr.

Thomas Sawyer, Jr., son of Thomas Sawyer, was born July 2, 1649, died September 5, 1736, at Lancaster. His will bequeathed to four sons and two daughters, and twelve pounds to purchase a communion vessel for the Lancaster Church. He was the first white child born in Lancaster. His capture by the Indians forms one of the most familiar stories of the Colonial period in Massachusetts. At the time of his capture he was living in the garrison with his father’s family. Queen Anne’s War was making the lives of the colonists unsafe, especially on the frontier. Indians made frequent attacks, and massacred men, women and children. On October 1695, Thomas Sawyer, Jr., his son Elias, and John Bigelow, of Marlboro, were at work in his saw mill where they were surprised and captured by the Indians. They were taken to Canada and Bigelow and young Sawyer were turned over to the French to ransom but they kept Thomas Sawyer to put to death by torture. Sawyer proposed to the French Governor that he should build a saw mill on the Chamblay River in consideration of saving his life from the Indians and giving the three captives their freedom. The French needed the mill and were glad of the opportunity. But the Indians had to be reckoned with. They insisted on burning Thomas Sawyer at the stake. They knew him and knew he was a brave man not afraid of torture and death. The crafty French Governor defeated their purpose by a ruse to the church. When Sawyer was tied to the stake a French friar appeared with a...

Biography of Thomas Sawyer

Tradition says that three brothers emigrated to America from Lincolnshire, England, sailing in a ship commanded by Captain Parker, and that their names were William, Edmund and Thomas Sawyer. They arrived in 1636, although Savage does not find William and Thomas until 1643. The fact that the Rowley records show that a tract of land was set off to Thomas Sawyer and another to Edward Sawyer in 1643, one of the boundaries of each lot being upon the ocean side, shows that the three brothers were William, Edward and Thomas, and that they came early in 1643 or just previous. Edmund came over seven years earlier and whether he was a brother of the others cannot be ascertained, but all agree that Thomas Sawyer was in Lancaster a few years after living at Rowley, and his descendants multiplied by the thousands. Thomas Sawyer was born in England in 1616 and died in 1706. The line of descent is through: (II) Thomas, Jr.; (III) William; (IV) Deacon Josiah; (V) Josiah, Jr.; (VI) Rufus; (VII) Addison; and (VIII) Eugene N. Sawyer. The biography of the first two ancestors follow. Thomas Sawyer was among the first emigrants to Lancaster. Richard Linton, Lawrence Waters and Thomas Bell had gifts of land in what was afterwards Lancaster as an inducement to settle there, Thomas Sawyer coming later. He was one of the nine persons in 1653 who organized the town, and gave it the name of Lancaster. He was a blacksmith and tiller of the soil, and one of the most conspicuous of the citizens. His farm was in the present grounds of the...

Biography of Albert Parsons

ALBERT PARSONS, expert in agriculture, cattle raiser, and dairy farmer of North Amherst, Massachusetts, was born June 1, 1883, in North Amherst, the son ‘ of Howard Albert Parsons. The family name of Parsons is derived from the Latin word persona, a mask. In early times actors wore a mask of wood to project their voices, a suggestion of the speaking-trumpet and telephone of later years. The actor came to be called after the mask he wore dramatis personae. The word had a two-fold meaning. In ecclesiastical language it was referable to a man of dignity, and bestowed upon one who had a benefice or living, who committed the cure of souls to a vicar. Thus actors and parsons derived their names from the same root. The early form, the parson’s son, or the parson’s John, was finally abbreviated to Parsons. The heraldic designs of this family were: Arms-Gules, two chevronels ermine between three eagles displayed or. Crest-An eagle’s leg erased at the thigh or, standing on a leopard’s face, gules. Among those of the family in America most conspicuous for their attainments have been the learned Theophilus Parsons, Chief Justice of Massachusetts; Andrew Parsons, Governor of Michigan; Lewis P. Parsons, Governor of Alabama; and General Lewis B. Parsons. The oldest known Parsons of record, under the herald’s visitations, was John of Cuddington, A. D. 1284. In the roll of possessions of the Abbey of Malmesbury is the name of William le Parsons, 1307. It was of the south, rather than the north of England. Thomas Parsons was in the squirarchy and gentry of England and lived at Great...

Biography of Henry Joseph Day

HENRY JOSEPH DAY – Taking into full consideration the varied and incessant activities of his long and useful life, it would not be an easy task to discover an experience similar to that of Mr. Day who at his Montague home, in his advancing age is remarkably well preserved, and still a man of business activity. Soldier of the Civil War, and participant in many of its leading battles, veteran in the tanning industry in this part of the State, practical farmer, dairyman and store-keeper, he possesses exemplary characteristics of physical endurance and perseverance, while his keen mentality continues to be an unfailing asset to his later days. A citizen of worth and honor, he shares the industrious heritage of a rugged ancestry. The following constitutes the leadership of the three generations of the branch name in this country. (I) Michael Day, who was born in England, came to America in the English army, and died of camp fever in the War of 1812. He married Salisbury, and they were the parents of 1. Joseph, of whom further. 2. Ellen. (II) Joseph Day was born in Claverack, near Hudson, New York State, in 1809, and it was a prideful statement of his that he was born in the same year with President Abraham Lincoln. He died in Montague in 1895. Mr. Day went to Connecticut in his early years, and residing at Lyme, he grew up in that district, and went thence on whaling voyages to the Indian Ocean. He went to Montague in 1840, and remained in that town to the time of his death. He was employed...

Biography of George Edward Reed

GEORGE EDWARD REED – Laundry interests in Western Massachusetts have a most satisfactory representative in the Amherst Laundry Company, of which George Edward Reed is the president, and whose prominent place in Amherst industry he was the means of securing, through a far-sighted and successful endeavor to establish an up-to-date plant. Mr. Reed is an expert man in his calling; he has spent practically all his career in the one line of business; and he is highly regarded by his associates and by the general public. He is of Vermont parentage and ancestry, his grandfather, David Swan Reed, a farmer, having spent his entire life in that State, and who had children: Frank; Fred; Clark; and Edward D., of whom further. Edward D. Reed, father of George Edward Reed, who was born in Dummerston, Vermont, kept a hotel for some time in West Gardner, Massachusetts, but he disappeared while Mr. Reed was a small boy, and his whereabouts had not since been reported. He married Ida S. Norcross, who was born in West Dummerston, Vermont; she married (second) Lorenzo McCrillis. Edward D. and Ida S. (Norcross) Reed had one son, George Edward, of whom further. George Edward Reed was born January 10, 1880, in Brattleboro, Vermont, and with the removal , of his parents to Massachusetts, he attended the public schools in West Gardner. For awhile he was employed in a meat market, but he soon afterwards went to work in a Brattleboro laundry, and from there he removed to Springfield, Vermont, where he began to engage in the laundry business on his own account. After three years there...

Biography of Lieutenant Joseph Kellogg

(I) Lieutenant Joseph Kellogg was born in Great Leigh, England, April 1, 1626, and died in 1707. The immigrant ancestor of the family, he at first settled at Farmington, Connecticut, where he was living in 1651. He removed to Boston in 1675, and thence to Hadley, where he had charge of the ferry between Hadley and Northampton, and kept a tavern, and he and his sons had land grants in Hadley. He was a sergeant of militia and was in command of the Hadley troops in the famous Turners Falls Fight at the time of the King Philip War, May 18, 1676. He married (first), in England, Joanna (surname unknown), who died in Hadley September 14, 1666; he married (second) Abigail Terry, who was born in Windsor, Connecticut, September 16, 1646, daughter of Stephen Terry; and there were nine children of the first marriage, and eleven of the second. One of his sons was Nathaniel, of whom further. (II) Nathaniel Kellogg, son of Lieutenant Joseph and Abigail (Terry) Kellogg, was born October 8, 1669, in Hadley. He was a lieutenant of the militia, and one of the largest tax-payers of the town. He married, June 28, 1692, Sarah Boltwood, born in Hadley October 1, 1672, daughter of Sergeant Samuel and Sarah (Lewis) Boltwood; her father was slain by Indians at Deerfield; her mother was a daughter of William Lewis, the first recorder of Farmington, Connecticut. They had nine children, one of whom was Ebenezer, of whom further. (III) Captain Ebenezer Kellogg was born in Hadley, May 31, 1695, and died August 7, 1766. He was a captain of militia...

Biography of Frank Andrew Brandle

FRANK ANDREW BRANDLE – Northampton is favored in its pharmaceutical interests with Mr. Brandle’s long association in the drug store business here, both during the period while he was in others’ employ, and particularly since he established his own pharmacy in 1901, the thorough reliability and excellence of his methods receiving general acknowledgement. Mr. Brandle’s training and study have been continuous since he entered upon his chosen business career; and as a result his pharmacy is second to no other in this part of the State. He is the son of Jacob Brandle who was born in 1836, in Germany, and died December 2, 1879, in Northampton, son of George and Rosa Brandle. Coming to the United States in his boyhood, he was employed in New York City for a short time, later residing several years in Providence, Rhode Island. He learned the tailor’s trade at which he worked several years, and he engaged in business at Northampton, where he died at forty-three years of age. He was a member of the German Society of Harigari. Jacob Brandle married, in Providence, Rhode Island, Caroline Held, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, and died June 16, 1919, in Northampton, daughter of Joseph and Rose (Mack) Held. She married (second) Charles Sanderson. The children of Jacob and Caroline (Held) Brandle: Flora I.; Frank A., of whom further; Rose E., who married Robert Dickinson, of Whately. Frank Andrew Brandle was born November 24, 1873, in Northampton, where he attended the public and the high schools, after which he started upon his druggist career. At first he was in the employ of the...

Biography of John E. Nilsson

JOHN E. NILSSON – An esteemed resident of Ludlow, Massachusetts, John E. Nilsson was born in Indian Orchard, in that State, November 15, 1884, the son of Jacob, a machinist, and Anna (Jenson) Nilsson. He attended the public schools and the High School of Springfield, and the Mechanical Arts High School of that city, and after his studies took a clerical position in the office of the Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company of Indian Orchard, where he remained for eight years. He then entered the Steven Duryea Plant in the production department. Here he remained till 1912, when he became associated with A. H. Bartlett, at No. 53 Smith Street, Ludlow, in the printing and wholesale stationery business, where he still remains. On the death of Mr. Bartlett, in October, 1920, the business was incorporated under the name of A. H. Bartlett Inc., and continued under this name until in December, 1924, it became the A. H. Bartlett Co., and as such continues. In addition to his other business interests, Mr. Nilsson is one of the trustees of the Ludlow Savings Bank, and Secretary of the Finance Committee of the town of Ludlow, which office he has held since 1922. Mr. Nilsson is a Mason, being a member of Bingham Lodge, of Ludlow; also Unity Royal Arch Chapter of Chicopee Falls; Springfield Council, Royal and Select Masters; Springfield Commandery, Knights Templar; Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and he is also a member of Rebekah Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; James W. Harmon Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, and Court Indian Leap, Independent Order...

Biography of Harry Lee Williams

HARRY LEE WILLIAMS – The family name of Williams is of great antiquity in England and Wales and is derived from the ancient personal name William. Like many other possessive names, it arose from the Welsh custom of adding to a man’s name the name of his father in the possessive form as William John’s, from which quickly came Jones, David Diehard’s, Thomas David’s (Davie’s, Davis) and kindred forms. Sir Robert Williams, ninth baronet of the house of Williams of Penrhyn, was a lineal descendant of Marchudd ap Cynan, Lord of Aberqeleu in Denbighshire, of one of the fifteen tribes of North Wales that lived in the time of Roderick the Great, King of the Britons, about A. D. 849. The seat of the family was in Flint, Wales, and in Lincolnshire, England. Oliver Cromwell, the Protector, was a Williams by right of descent, and was related to Richard Williams, who settled in Taunton, Massachusetts. Alden de Cromwell lived in the time of William the Conqueror, and from him descended in succession ten Ralphs de Cromwell, the last dying without issue. The seventh Ralph de Cromwell married Amicia, daughter of Robert Berer, member of Parliament. Robert Cromwell was a Lancasterian, killed in the wars of 1461. His son, William Cromwell, left a daughter, Margaret, who was ancestor of both Cromwell and Williams. John Cromwell, son of William Cromwell, married Joan Smith, and had a son, Walter Cromwell, who married a Glossop. Katherine, daughter of Walter Cromwell, married Morgan Williams, fifth from Howell Williams. Sir Richard Williams, son of Morgan and Katherine Williams, born about 1495, married Francis Murfyn. After...

Biography of Clifford Carroll Howes

CLIFFORD CARROLL HOWES – The Howes family of Massachusetts belong to the oldest families settled in New England, and. the last three generations as represented in some of its members are as follows: (I) Francis Edwin Howes, grandfather of Clifford Carroll Howes, died in North Adams, Massachusetts, at the age of ninety-three years. He was a carpenter by trade. He married Julia A. Church. The children of the marriage were: 1. Julia, who married Martin Holbrook. 2. May, who married Fred Knapp. 3. Edwin P., of whom further. 4. Amelia, who died at the age of eleven years. 5. Hattie, who died at the age of two years. 6. Horace Howes. (II) Edwin P. Howes, father of Clifford Carroll Howes, a native of Hancock, Massachusetts, where he was born October 12, 1850, died at Leyden, Massachusetts, in May, 1919. He was a farmer in early life, and went to Haydenville, Massachusetts, where for ten years he worked in a brass shop. He later lived in the town of Florida, Massachusetts, where he farmed. In 1894 he came to Leyden, Massachusetts, where he ran a general store up to the time of his death. He served on the Board of Assessors and Selectmen, but did not take a great interest in politics. In religion he was a member and attendant of the Methodist Church of which he was treasurer at the time of his death. He was also connected with the Grange. On September 24, 1874, he married Rispeh Minerva Brown, born July 18, 1855, in Florida, Massachusetts, a daughter of Sumner and Clarissa (Burnett) Brown. The children of the...
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