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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and saw what they had for supper that night. They however did not discover themselves till the second day after. They probably wished to take a little time to learn the strength and preparation of the inhabitants. The next day, Mrs. M’Coy, attended by their two dogs, went down to see if any of the other families had returned from the garrison. She found no one. On her return, as she was passing the blockhouse, which stood near the present site of the meeting-house, the dogs, which had passed round it, came running back growling and very much excited. Their appearance induced her to make the best of her way...

Arosaguntacook Tribe

Arosaguntacook Indians: A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living in Androscoggin County, Maine. Their village, which bore the same name, was on Androscoggin River, probably near Lewiston. The various names used indiscriminately for the tribe and the river may be resolved into the forms Ammoscoggin and Arosaguntacook, which have received different interpretations, all seeming to refer to the presence of fish in the stream . The name seems to have been used only for the part of the river in Androscoggin County between the falls near Jay and those near Lewiston. The present name was obtained by changing the first part of the word to Andros in compliment to Gov. Andros. The Arosaguntacook lived on the edge of the first English settlements in Maine, and consequently suffered much in the various Indian wars, in which they took a prominent part from 1675 until their removal to Canada. Their town was burned by the English in 1690. As the settlements pushed into the interior the Wawenoc, at the mouth of the river, moved up and joined the Arosaguntacook, and at a later period the combined tribes moved still farther up and joined the Rocameca. These movements led to much confusion in the statements of writers, as the united tribes were commonly known by the name of the leading one, the Arosaguntacook or Androscoggin. These tribes, together with the Pigwacket, removed to St. Francis, Canada, soon after the defeat of the Pequawket by Lovewell in 1725. Here the Arosaguntacook were still the principal tribe and their dialect (Abnaki) was adopted by all the inhabitants of the village, who were frequently...

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