Yavapai Apache Tribe

Yavapai Apache Indians, Yavapai Indians, Apache Mohave Indians (said to be from enyaéva ‘sun,’ pai `people’: ‘people of the sun’). A Yuman tribe, popularly known as Apache Mohave and Mohave Apache, i. e., ‘hostile or warlike Mohave.’ According to Corbusier, the tribe, before its removal to the Rio Verde agency in May 1873, claimed as its



Biography of Nahche, an Apache Warrior

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Apache Medicine Man ~ Nakaidoklini

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Pinal Coyotero Apache Tribe

Pinal Coyotero Indians. A part of the Coyotero Apache, whose chief rendezvous was the Pinal mountains and their vicinity, north of Gila River in Arizona. They ranged, however, about the sources of the Gila, over the Mogollon Mesa, and from northern Arizona to the Gila and even southward. They are now under the San Carlos



Tonto Apache Tribe

Tontos (Spanish: ‘fools,’ so called on account of their supposed imbecility; the designation, however, is a misnomer). A name so indiscriminately applied as to be almost meaningless. To a mixture of Yavapai, Yuma, and Mohave, with some Pifialeno Apache, placed on the Rio Verde Reservation, Arizona, in 1873, and transferred to San Carlos Reservation in



Apache Indian Research

Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, ‘enemy,’ the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated “Apaches de Nabaju” by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). A number of tribes forming the most southerly group of the Athapascan family. The name has been applied also to some unrelated Yuman tribes, as the Apache Mohave (Yavapai) and



Lipan Apache Tribe

Lipan Apache Indians (adapted from Ipa-n’de, apparently a personal name; n’de=’people’). An Apache tribe, designating themselves Náizhan (‘ours,’ ‘our kind’), which at various periods of the 18th and 19th centuries roamed from the lower Rio Grande in New Mexico and Mexico eastward through Texas to the Gulf coast, gaining a livelihood by depredations against other



Mimbreños Apache Tribe

Mimbreños (Spanish: ‘people of the willows’). A branch of the Apache who took their popular name from the Mimbres mountains, southwest New Mexico, but who roamed over the country from the east side of the Rio Grande in New Mexico to San Francisco River in Arizona, a favorite haunt being near Lake Guzman, west of



Mescalero Apache Tribe

Mescaleros Apache Indians (Spanish: `mescal people,’ from their custom of eating mescal). An Apache tribe which formed a part of the Faraones and Vaqueros of different periods of the Spanish history of the southwest. Their principal range was between the Rio Grande and the Pecos in New Mexico, but it extended also into the Staked



Jicarilla Apache Tribe

Jicarilla (Mexican Spanish: `little basket’). An Athapascan tribe, first so called by Spaniards because of their expertness in making vessels of basketry. They apparently formed a part of the Vaqueros of early Spanish chronicles, although, according to their creation legend, they have occupied from the earliest period the mountainous region of southeast Colorado and northern



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