Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.



Siksika Indians

Siksika Indians. Located in the territory stretching from North Saskatchewan River, Canada, to the southern. headstreams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about longitude 105° W. to the base of the Rocky Mountains. The Siksika belong to the Algonquian linguistic stock, forming the most aberrant of all the well-recognized tongues of that family except Arapaho and Atsina.



Sutaio Indians

Sutaio Indians. When first brought distinctly to the knowledge of Whites, this tribe was west of Missouri River, between it and the Black Hills in South Dakota.



Cheyenne Indians

Cheyenne Indians. This tribe moved frequently; in South Dakota they were associated with the Cheyenne River and the Black Hills. (See also Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wyoming.)



Atsina Indians

Atsina Indians. Probably from Blackfoot At-se’-na, supposed to mean “gut people.” Also called: Acapatos, by Duflot de Mofras (1844). A-re-tear-o-pan-ga, Hidatsa name. Bahwetego-weninnewug, Chippewa name, signifying “fall people.” Bot-k’in’ago, signifying “belly men.” Fall Indians, common early name. Gros Ventres des Plaines, derived from an incorrect interpretation of the tribal sign and the qualifying phrase “des



Chowanoc Indians

Chowanoc Tribe: Meaning in Algonquian “(people) at the south.” Chowanoc Connections. The Chowanoc belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and were evidently most nearly allied to the other North Carolina Algonquians. Chowanoc Location. On Chowan River about the junction of Meherrin and Blackwater Rivers. Chowanoc Villages Catoking, (probably) near Gatesville, in Gates County. Maraton, on



Coree Indians

Coree tribe, or Coranine Tribe, Coranine Indians. Meaning unknown. Coree Connections. As the final stage of the Coree existence was passed with an Algonquian tribe, some have thought that the affiliations of  this people were also Algonquian. On the other hand Lawson (1860) that notes that their language and that of a tribe to the



Hatteras Indians

Hatteras Tribe: Meaning unknown. Linguistic Connections – The Hatteras belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family. Hatteras Location. Among the sandbanks about Cape Hatteras east of Pamlico Sound and frequenting Roanoke Island. Hatteras Village. Sandbanks, on Hatteras Island. Hatteras History. Lawson (1860) thought the Hatteras showed traces of White blood and therefore they may have been



Machapunga Indians

Machapunga Tribe: Said to mean “bad dust,” or “much dirt,” in the native Algonquian language. Machapunga Connections. The Machapunga belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock. Machapunga Location. In the present Hyde County and probably also in Washington, Tyrrell and Dare Counties, and part of Beaufort. Machapunga Villages. The only village named is Mattamuskeet (probably on



Moratoc Indians

Moratok Tribe, Moratok Indians (Moratoc Tribe). A place name, but the meaning otherwise unknown. Moratoc Connections. There is little doubt that the Moratok belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock and were closely related to the other Algonquian tribes of the sound region of North Carolina. Moratoc Location. On Roanoke River and apparently on the north



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