Biography of Haywood Mooney

Haywood B. Mooney first saw the light of day in the state of Georgia, seventy-three years ago. His father moved to Alabama when Haywood was a child. When he had grown to be quite a lad, being rather precocious, he was stolen from his home and from his parents by sporting men who gambled on horse racing of fine-blooded stock. They used him for light riding and he proved to be the very chap they needed in their profession, so they kept him for a period of three years by offering such inducements as would please the boy. About this time a war took place between the American Republic and the Republic of Mexico.

Young Mooney was employed by the United States agent to carry the express mail from Mobile, Alabama, to Montgomery, Alabama. He continued in this capacity during the existence of the war. He then served as an apprentice and learned the trade of engineering and followed steamboating on the rivers for eight years. During this time his father had died and his mother had moved to Sulphur Springs, in Hopkins County, on what is known as the old Jim Mooney place. While Mr. Mooney was on his way to the county to see his aged mother, coming from Colorado River in Texas, where he had been engaged in steamboating for several years, he met Miss Martha Jane Goodson, the daughter of an esteemed old pioneer Texan, with whom he became attached. He returned to his labor on the river, but within one year’s time he closed out the business of steamboating, visited his mother again, met once more the girl who had stolen his heart, and they were united in marriage.

He and his bride left the state immediately and went by way of water to California. While in the state of California the Civil war between the states broke out. In order to prevent the United States from conscripting him and compelling him to serve in the Union army, he left California with his family and moved to Oregon and placed himself and family under the protection of General Lane, a southern gentleman. When the war was ended he went back to his home in California and remained for a couple of years and then returned to Hopkins County and settled upon the exact spot of land where he has since lived and raised his family. Haywood Jr. is his oldest child. We give the name of his children and their order of birth. Bill Mooney, Henry, Annie, Sarah, Tom S., and Jim Mooney. They all live within reach of their parents and are all good, reliable, worthy citizens of the county.

Mr. Mooney is happily constituted. He is hopeful and very cheerful. He has been a great dancer, and for numbers of years has amused many in the performance of what is called in vulgar parlance clog and jig dances. His family are all musicians, and the Mooney band is famous in Hopkins County. They are all sober, honest, upright men, but are fond of much fun. Mr. Mooney has served his county notably and honorably as deputy sheriff, hunting up and running down horse-thieves and other criminals and evildoers. He was looked upon by this class of outlaws as being a Mooney, terror to them, and they always kept a close watch upon his movements. He has been useful in many ways. Being a born doctor he has been of great help to his neighbors during sickness. Being blessed with a kind heart and a generous disposition he has often been imposed upon by unappreciating people who would use his skill and medicine without compensating him. He will be greatly missed when he is called to his long home in eternity.



MLA Source Citation:

Fleming, E. B. Early History of Hopkins County Texas: Biographical sketches and incidents of the early settled families. Unknown. 1902 AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 1 August 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/texas/biography-of-haywood-mooney.htm - Last updated on Mar 18th, 2012


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