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The Proprietors of Norwich Vermont

The larger part of the names of the grantees of Norwich are names of Connecticut men then resident in Mansfield and neighboring towns. Captain Hezekiah Johnson, Samuel Slafter, Joseph Storrs, and William Johnson 3rd, are known to have lived in Mansfield; Amos Fellows, James West, Adoniram Grant, and Samuel Cobb were of Tolland; Ebenezar Heath, Captain Abner Barker and William Johnson of Willington, towns adjacent to Mansfield on the north. The last nine names are those of New Hampshire and Massachusetts men, several of them members of the provincial government in the former province. Major Joseph Blanchard was of Dunstable, Mass. He had executed in 1760, by direction of Governor Wentworth, the first survey of the townships lying along the river from Charlestown to Newbury. His name appears as proprietor in many town charters about this time. But few of the original grantees ever came personally to Norwich to settle. Many of them, it is probable, were people of considerable property, well advanced in life, whose years unfitted them to endure the hard-ships of pioneers in a new settlement. Such would naturally transfer their rights to their sons, or to the young and enterprising among their friends and neighbors. This is known to have been the case in several instances. But Jacob Fenton and Ebenezar Smith, both proprietors, were here in 1763. The former died on the 15th of July of that year, and was thus the first white man known to have died within the township. Captain Hezekiah Johnson emigrated to the town very early and settled near the mouth of Ompompanoosuc River. He was long a leading...

Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that the records of a New England town should be printed and presented to the governments of Europe, to the English nation as a thank-offering and as a certificate of the progress of the Saxon race; to the continental nations as a lesson of humanity and love. De Tocqueville said that the government of a New England township was the best specimen of a pure democracy that the world has ever seen. The town charters granted by New Hampshire conferred upon the inhabitants of each township, from its first organization, the right of self-government in town meeting, by the election of town officers and general ejection of town affairs. Such, also, had long been the practice in Connecticut, from whence a large proportion of all the early settlers had immigrated to their new homes in the New Hampshire Grants. The royal decision of July 20, 1764, which extended the boundary of New York to the west bank of the Connecticut River, soon resulted in the practical relinquishment by New Hampshire...

War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the men who attempted to advance on them. At 9 o’clock Gen. Gillem‘s command moved forward from the position gained on Tuesday, and soon occupied the ledge next to Jack’s camp. Col. Mason moved the right forward as rapidly as possible to form a junction with Gen. Gillem‘s left, cutting off the Modoc from the lake, their only source of water supply. The junction was affected at noon. At 2 p. m. the mortars were throwing shells within excellent range. Col Greene fell back behind the ledge, awaiting the Modoc, should the shells drive them out. After the firing the Modoc replied with yells. After the fifth shell there came a raking fire and a small party of men sprang out of the chasm and came into the lines amid a shower of bullets. The falling back was caused by the Modoc flanking and opening a crossfire. Col. Miller, attempting to form a junction with the Warm Spring Indians, missed them as he swung down into the great chasm with thirteen men, whereupon Miller...

Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian

Third session, Thursday morning, October 17 Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian, was introduced as the next speaker. Rev. Frank Wright. With the Choctaws the land question is, When shall we get hold of our land? All we want is the land. We were the first of the five tribes to agree to take it in severalty, and we are the last to get our allotments. I do not know why. So far as making farmers of the Indians, in dealing with a man you have got to take him as you find him. You cannot make blacksmiths of all the Indians, and you can not make farmers of them all. Some will turn to the ministry, some to medicine, and some to law. You can make no hard and fast rule about it. But the first principle to teach him is that he must labor to take care of himself. The Indian must become self-dependent. We have been giving them rations till they are pauperized. It is a scandal and a shame, and I shall be glad when rations are absolutely cut off and the Indians must work or starve. I have worked among the Apaches, who were held as prisoners, and have established missions among them, and I want to tell you what I have found there. These prisoners were compelled to work, and it had a wonderful influence on them. It gave them an incentive; it took away their aimless life; it took them away from gambling; it showed them how to do things. I am in favor of compelling Indians to work. These Apaches worked eight...

Biography of James H. Wright

James H. Wright, one of the oldest grain buyers in the County, residing at Arthur, was born near the town of Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, February 6,1827 ,and is a son of James and Mary (Kidd) Wright, who were born near Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, of Scotch-Irish origin. Rev. James Wright (father) received his education for the Presbyterian ministry at the Canonsburg College, and spent most of his life in preaching the gospel, first at Poland, and later at Westfield, Pennsylvania. He died in 1843 at the age of fifty-nine years. His father was Alexander Wright, who was an early settler from the north of Ireland, to Washing-ton County. He married a Scotch girl by the name of Esther Silcox. Robert Kidd (grand-father) was also a native of Ireland, was an early settler in Trumbull County, Ohio, and in religious affairs he was known as a Seceder in that day, now known as a United Presbyterian. James H. Wright was reared in his native County, acid in Pennsylvania, receiving the advantages of an ordinary education. In 1857 he came west and located at Arcola, which at that time contained but three houses, and was for several years engaged in farming in that vicinity. In 1873 he commenced buying grain at Hindsboro, where he continued successfully in business until 1886, when he removed to Arthur, where he has since resided, engaged in buying grain for the firm of Bartlett, Kuhn & Co. In 1848 Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Rogers, who was a daughter of Samuel and Sarah Waugh Rogers. She...

Reuben Wright Genealogy

Oliver Wright 1. Reuben2 Wright, son of Oliver1, was b. in Keene, Apr. 29, 1772, of Oliver and Sarah Wright; d. Houghton, Mich., Aug. 18, 1852; m. Dec. 30 (or 31), Olive Atwood, b. Templeton, Mass., July 5, 1775, d. Washington, N. H., Aug. 15, 1842; dau. of John and Elizabeth (Lawrence) Atwood of Packersfield. Ch.: Roxana3, b. Marlboro, Sept. 8, 1800, m. Dec. 18, 1827, Amos Corey, Jr., of Washington, N. H., b. there, Sept. 19, 1802; d. Antrim, Apr. 6, 1872, son of Amos and Achsah (Townsend) Corey. She d. at Antrim, Sept. 7, 1872. They had moved from Washington to Antrim in 1857. Ch.: Achsah Louisa4, b. Washington, N. H., 1828; m. Mar. 1857, Peter Shuttleworth of Southborough, Mass. Ch.: Ella J.5 Shuttleworth, b. May 23, 1858. Alva Kay5 Shuttleworth, b. June 14, 1859. Ida May5 Shuttleworth, b. Feb. 2, 1862. Caroline Louisa5 Shuttleworth, b. Feb. 14, 1865. Clara Mabel5 Shuttleworth, b. Oct. 11, 1866. Olive Wright4 Corey, b. Washington, N. H., 1830; d. unm. in 1872. Melinda A.4 Corey, b. Washington, 1832; d. unm. in 1861. George F.4 Corey, b. Washington, Apr. 23, 1836; m. Nov. 29, 1860, Clara R. Hill, b. Antrim, 1841; dau. of Henry and Rebecca (Kelso) Hill of Antrim. They lived for a time at Waltham, where he was employed in the watch factory, but returned to the old homestead in So. Antrim, in 1876, where he d. Mar. 1890. They had no children. Reuben Jr.3, b. Marlboro, Aug. 5, 1802, m. Fanny Hopkins; he d. in Lexington, Mich., 1860. They had five children; we have the birth dates of only...

Phineas Wright Genealogy

Phinehas Wright of Hartford, Conn., m. Zilpha Cooper of Westmoreland, N. H., settled at Walpole and removed to Keene abt. 1796. Caleb2 Wright, son of Phinehas, b. Feb. 15, 1794, d. Keene, Nov. 21, 1869; m. Dec. 7, 1815, Sarah Reed, b. Surry, July 14, 1796, d. Keene, Nov. 16, 1838. Among their fifteen children, was: Calvin3, b. Keene, Mar. 13, 1816; d. Gilsum, Feb. 16, 1907; m. Diantha Leborveau of Keene, and had six children. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Wright lived in S., on the Old Kemp or John Dunn place for a few years, and had born here:  Harriet Emily4, b. Oct. 14, 1847; d. Feb. 14, 1848. A son, George Abbott4, b. Swanzey, Aug. 18, 1844; d. S. Mar. 3, 1848. These two children were buried in the village cemetery in Surry. We have more in regard to the Caleb Wright family, but do not print it as an extended account of the Wright family is being prepared for the Surry Town...

John Wright Genealogy

I have not yet ascertained the relationship of John and “Billy” Wright. “Billy” may have been the father or a brother of John. John moved from Nelson to Sullivan, and Billy bought land there. His land in Sullivan, was on the Alonzo Mason lot, and he may have lived in the house on that lot for a while. Perry Wright, a son of Tabitha (looks as if spelled Talatha on Nelson records), an adopted son of Billy Wright and Sally his wife, d. at Packersfield (now Nelson), Feb. 24, 1814. William Wright of Packersfield, m. Oct. 1, 1793, Sally Willard of Lancaster, Mass. On records of Dublin is found, William Wright, m. May 3, 1804 Sally Dunckley. “Billy” Wright, a joiner, is in Dublin in 1805. There was a “Billy” Wright, who d. in Surry, Feb. 21, 1874, unm., and known to have been a son of Oliver. The relationship of these several Billy Wrights requires further investigation. John Wright, m. Jan. 1, 1795, Phebe Stoddard, dau. of Richard and Rachel (Hill) Stoddard. She m. after his death, in Sullivan, in 1815. Ch.: Polly2, b. Packersfield, Apr. 7, 1795. Rachel2, b. Packersfield, Mar. 9, 1797. Phebe2, b. Packersfield, Dec. 7, 1798. Chloe2, b. Packersfield, May 14, 1801. Clarissa2, b. Packersfield, May 25, 1803. Milan2, b. S., Dec. 25, 1807; d. in S., Aug. 17, 1831, unm. Minot2, b. Oct. 6, 1812 in...

John Wright Genealogy

John Wright m. Mary and res. Dunstable. Benjamin2 Wright, son of John1, b. at Dunstable, d. Milford, N. H., res. at Mile Slip (afterwards Milford); m. Betsey Adams of Dunstable (now Nashua). Of their eleven children eight were b. in Mile Slip, and the last three in Milford: Benjamin, b. May 20, 1775; d. Sept. 19, 1777. Benjamin; Betsey; Ira; Joel, 1, b. Jan. 26, 1784; Oliver; Sally; Mary; Lydia; Nehemiah and Gratia. Joel3 Wright, son of Benjamin2, was the fifth minister and third settled pastor of the First Cong. Church of S. See page 409. According to the Milford, N. H. records, he was b. Jan. 26, other authorities give it Jan. 27, 1784. Res. in the old Muzzey house while in S.; he was an invalid the last ten years of his life and died at South Hadley, Mass., June 8, 1859; m. Lucy W. Grosvenor, b. Paxton, Mass., Dec. 8, 1785; d. Fond DuLac, Wis., Oct. 18, 1861; dau. of Rev. Daniel and Deborah (Hall) Grosvenor of Petersham, Mass. Ch.: Daniel Grosvenor4, b. Leverett, Mass., Sept. 22, 1813, d. in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1897; m. May 25, 1836, Aletta Van Brunt; dau. of Jeremiah of New Utrecht, L. I. In Sullivan he lived where Mrs. Amos Wardwell recently lived. He was then a farmer. He afterwards studied for the ministry, took orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church, and became a D. D. See an account of him on Page 590. Ch. b. Sullivan: Jeremiah VanBrunt5, b. June 11, 1838. Joel Williston5, b. July 30, 1840; d. at Lake Placid, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1912....

Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the present town of Danville, where he lived and kept tavern for many years. A Methodist minister named Prescott, stopped at his house one day to get his dinner, and there being no men present he went to the barn to feed his horse. While looking around for the food he saw some large flat gourds, which he supposed to be pumpkins, and fed a lot of them to his horse. After that he was called Gourd Head Prescott. In 1833 Mr. Wright sold his place to Rev. Andrew Monroe, a well known pioneer Methodist preacher, who lived there and kept tavern for some time. Isabella Wright, sister of William Wright, Sr., married John Stone, who settled in Montgomery County in 1818, but afterward removed to...
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