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Slave Narrative of Alex Woodson

Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: Alex Woodson Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Woodsonville, Hart County, Kentucky, Age: 80-85 Place of ResidenceL 905 E. 4th St., New Albany, Indiana Iris Cook Dist 4 Floyd Co. SLAVE STORY THE STORY OF ALEX WOODSON 905 E. 4th St. New Albany, Ind. Observation of Writer Alex Woodson is an old light skinned darkey, he looks to be between 80 and 85, it is hard to tell his age, and colored folks hardly ever do know their correct age. I visited him in his little cottage and had a long talk with him and his wife (his second). “Planted the fust one.” They run a little grocery in the front room of the cottage. But the stock was sadly run down. Together with the little store and his “pinshun” (old age pension) these old folks manage to get along. Alex Woodson was born at Woodsonville, in Hart County, Kentucky, just across Green River from Munfordville. He was a good sized boy, possibly 7 years or more when “Freedom wuz declared”. His master was “Old Marse” Sterrett who had about a 200 acre place and whose son in law Tom Williams ran a store on this place. When Williams married Sterretts daughter he was given Uncle Alex and his mother and brother as a present. Williams was then known as “Young Master.” When war come Old Master gave his (Woodson’s) mother a big roll of bills, “greenbacks as big as Yo’ arm”, to keep for him, and was forced to leave the neighborhood. After the war the old darkey returned the money to...

Slave Narrative of Charles H. Anderson

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Charles H. Anderson Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Birth: Richmond, Virginia Date of Birth: December 23, 1845 Place of Residence: 3122 Fredonia St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Handy man “Life experience excels all reading. Every place you go, you learn something from every class of people. Books are just for a memory, to keep history and the like, but I don’t have to go huntin’ in libraries, I got one in my own head, for you can’t forget what you learn from experience.” The old man speaking is a living example of his theory, and, judging from his bearing, his experience has given him a philosophical outlook which comprehends love, gentleness and wisdom. Charles H. Anderson, 3122 Fredonia Street, was born December 23, 1845, in Richmond, Virginia, as a slave belonging to J.L. Woodson, grocer, “an exceedingly good owner not cruel to anyone”. With his mother, father, and 15 brothers and sisters, he lived at the Woodson home in the city, some of the time in a cabin in the rear, but mostly in the “big house”. Favored of all the slaves, he was trusted to go to the cash drawer for spending money, and permitted to help himself to candy and all he wanted to eat. With the help of the mistress, his mother made all his clothes, and he was “about as well dressed as anybody”. “I always associated with high-class folks, but I never went to church then, or to school a day in my life. My owner never sent me or my brothers, and then when free schools came in, education...

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin N. Woodson

County Attorney of Fannin County, was born in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in 1850; came with his father to this state, four years later. He grew up, and was partly educated at Honey Grove. In 1872, he attended school at Glascow, Missouri, from which place he went to New York City, studied law and obtained his diploma in a law school of that city. Not long after this, he was admitted to the bar and licensed to practice by Judge Davis, of New York. In 1875, he came back to Honey Grove, but afterwards moved to Ladonia, where he remained until elected county attorney in 1884, when he, with his interesting family, removed to...

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