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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Read Family of Massachusetts

(I) John Read, supposed son of William and Lucy (Henage) Read, was born in 1598, and it is said came to America with the great fleet in 1630. He is of record in 1637 in Weymouth, was in Dorchester the next year, and went from there to that part of Braintree now Quincy. In 1643 or 1644 he accompanied Rev. Mr. Newman and his church society to Rehoboth, where his name appears the third on the list of purchasers of the town. He was a man of large property for those times, and held the office of constable, which was the chief executive office in town. He lived in that part of Rehoboth now Seekonk, and was a prominent and leading man; he kept a public house. He died Sept. 7, 1685, aged eighty-seven years. The Christian name of his wife was Sarah, and their children were: Samuel, William, Abigail, John, Thomas, Ezekiel and Zachariah (twins), Moses, Mary, Elizabeth, Daniel, Israel and Mehetabel. (II) Samuel Read, son of John, joined the colonists of Braintree in the settlement of Mendon, Mass. He married in 1661 Hopestill Holbrook. He was constable of Mendon in 1681. From him have descended the Mendon, Uxbridge, Northbridge, Milford, Oxford and Charlton Reads. His children were: Mary, Samuel, Ebenezer, John, Sarah, Josiah. The mother of these died Jan. 12, 1706, and he married again, the Christian name of his wife being Hannah. She died Jan. 24, 1717. His will is dated April 5, 1717. (III) Ebenezer Read, son of Samuel and Hopestill, married Feb. 7, 1704, Sarah Chapin, who lived to the advanced age of ninety-five...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends, volumes 2 and 3 contain some information on early Connecticut Indians. Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society: Volume 1 Rev. Thomas Hooker’s Letter to Governor Winthrop, 1638 Abstracts of Two Sermons by Rev. Thomas Hooker, in the Years 1638, 1639 Trial of Ezekiel Cheever before the New Haven Church, 1649 An account of the trial of Ezekiel Cheever, before the Church at New Haven, is printed from a contemporary manuscript, supposed to be by Cheever himself. Letter from Governor Winthrop Respecting the Charter of Connecticut, 1662 The People’s Right to Election, by Gershom Bulkeley, 1689 Their Majesties Colony of Connecticut Vindicated, 1745 Connecticut Officers at Louisbourg A List of the officers in the Connecticut Regiment, under the command of Lt. General Pepperell, at the Reduction of Louisbourg and Territories depending, to the obedience of his Britannick Majesty, and garrisoned the same until relieved by the British troops. Papers Relating to the Ticonderoga Expedition, 1775 Journal of Captain Edward Mott: An interesting narrative of the origin, progress, and successful result of the expedition from Connecticut, for the reduction of Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Major...

Howard Family of Brockton Massachusetts

This article is to treat particularly of the John Haward/Howard branch of the family to which belonged the late Daniel S. Howard, who was one of Brockton’s foremost citizens and most successful shoe manufacturers; his brother, Gorham B. Howard, now retired, who for a number of years was one of that city’s successful merchants, engaged in the dry goods business; and the former’s sons, Warren A. Howard, now deceased, who for years was extensively engaged in the manufacture of shoes, and Daniel S. Howard, Jr., who is president of the Emerson Shoe Company, of Rockland, Massachusetts.

Descendants of Mark Lothrop of Bridgewater MA

The Lothrop family, of which the late Frederick Lothrop Ames was a descendant on his mother’s side, is an old family of Massachusetts. The name Lowthrop, Lothrop or Lathrop is derived from Lowthrope, a small parish in the wapentake of Dickering, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, four and a half miles northeast from Great Driffield, and a perpetual curacy in the archdeaconry of York. The church there was an ancient institution, said to have been built about the time of Edward III., although there has been no institution to it since 1579.

Descendants of John Ames of West Bridgewater MA

The Ames surname is of early English origin, and the family living at Bristol bore the following coat of arms: Argent, on a bend cotised sable, three roses of the field. Motto: Fama Candida rosa dulcior. Crest: A white rose. (I) John Ames was buried at Bruton, Somersetshire, England, in 1560. (II) John Ames (2), son of John, died in 1583; married Margery Crome. Children: John Ames. Launcelot Ames. William Ames. (III) John Ames (3), son of John (2), born in 1560, died in 1629, married Cyprian Browne. Children: William Ames. John Ames, went to New England, settling first at Duxbury, where his name was on a list of those able to bear arms in 1643; removed to Bridgewater, and married Oct. 20, 1645, Elizabeth Heyward; died and left his estate to his brother’s heirs. (IV) William Ames, son of John (3), born in 1605, came to New England and settled in Braintree as early as 1638. He was admitted a freeman May 26, 1647. The Christian name of his wife was Hannah. After his death, which occurred Jan. 1, 1653-54, she married (second) April 6, 1660, John Heiden (Hayden). Children: Hannah Ames, born May 12, 1641; Rebecca Ames, born in October, 1642; Lydia Ames, born in 1645; John Ames, born March 24, 1647; Sarah Ames, born March 1, 1650; Deliverance Ames, born Feb. 6, 1653.” (V) John Ames (4), son of William, born March 24, 1647, married Sarah, daughter of John Willis. He settled in West Bridgewater, Mass., as early as 1672. He served in King Philip’s War. He died about 1726, when his estate was settled. Children:...

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