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Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, moved to Wales early in the seventeenth century, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Porstmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653 and 1654; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He...

Descendants of Charles Howard, North Bridgewater, MA

CHARLES HOWARD, founder and president of the Howard & Poster Company, one of the largest and best known shoe manufacturing concerns in this Commonwealth, and an original promoter of the Brockton Agricultural Society, of which he is also president, is one of the foremost business men and citizens of Brockton, Plymouth Co., Mass., for over forty years continuously and prominently identified with the industrial and financial growth of that city. Mr. Howard was born Jan. 9, 1837, in North Bridgewater, now Brockton, eldest son of the late Charles and Lavina (Rounds) Howard, and a descendant of several of New England’s earliest settled families. The Howard family is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, the name being variously spelled Haywood, Hayward and Howard, and these forms are often confounded, by many being pronounced alike. They seem to have been the same name originally, although for several generations many bearing the name have adopted the spelling Howard. The genealogy of the family here under consideration follows, the generations being given in chronological order from the first American ancestor of this branch of the family. (I) William Hayward or Haywood was an early inhabitant of Charlestown, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1637. He removed to Braintree, where he was deputy in 1641, and bought land in 1648. He signed his name “William Haywood” as witness to a deed of James Everill in 1654. He was drowned the 10th day of the 3d month, 1659. Administration was granted the 14th of June, 1659, to his widow Margery for herself and children. The widow died the 18th of the...

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds, born Nov. 11, 1822, married Theodore Lilley, of North Bridgewater, and died Jan. 28, 1882; Rhoda Perkins, born Oct. 28, 1830, married Barnabas H. Gray, of Kingston, Mass.; Sanford, born Nov. 25, 1833, died in Boston, though he lived at Louisville, Ky., where he was engaged in the shoe business, and where he married Maggie J. Harvey. Charles Keith, the father, died July 29, 1859, and the mother passed away April 22, 1863. Naturally of a “bookish” turn of mind, outdoor occupations had little attraction for Mr. Keith, and in the gratification of his tastes and inclinations farming pursuits were neglected for the less severe physical occupation of the shop. In his younger days he was evidently quite an athlete, for it is related that at the “raising” of Sprague’s Mill, Factory Village, a wrestling match was planned for the occasion, and that he was pitted against several, all of whom he overcame, when, as a last resort, Lieut. Israel Packard was brought forward to contend for the honors; after a protracted struggle he, too, was...

Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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